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Author Topic: Tooth Alignment Necessary?  (Read 441 times)
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Jhereg

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« on: Jan 22, 2018, 06:42AM »

Hi All,

Over the past several years, I've noticed that two of my front teeth have shifted. I noticed this because I keep biting my lip in the front, it's really annoying and has gotten worse gradually over time. My two front teeth have always had a slight overlap, and I have a small overbite, both of which were minor enough that my dentists felt they weren't worth fixing. But now the overlap has gotten worse, and two teeth are starting to poke forward. I'm concerned that this will become more uncomfortable than it is now, and begin to effect my playing.

Someone suggested that I post here to get some opinions. I was thinking of getting Invisalign. Bottom teeth are fine so would only need the top worked on.

Here's a pic, if you're grossed out by teeth or my ugly face, look away. You can clearly see which two teeth are pushing out.





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bigbassbone1

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« Reply #1 on: Jan 22, 2018, 07:02AM »

I am no dentist but have an very unusual teeth and jaw setup? For lack of a better description.... I was told by a dentist when I was 8 years old that if my parents didnt pay to have my teeth and jaw "fixed" I wouldnt be able to talk or eat properly by the time I turned 12. My parents couldnt afford extreme dental work, and even as a child I didnt want it, so it never happened..... a few decades on and I dont have any dental issues at all... and speak without real problems  :D

I would only bother having it "fixed" if you think it is the trombone that is causing it and that continually playing will have more of a negative effect. Then after fixing it, maybe reassess if you can change how you play to prevent it from happening again.

My bottom teeth go over my top teeth at all times.... I cannot put my top teeth over my bottom teeth at all. I think its called an underbite. That is, except one tooth on my right side which sticks out. I don't think it impacts my playing in a negative way at all, and there is no dental issue that is gradually getting worse because of my trombone.

You are not clear in your post, do you think your teeth are doing this because of how you play the trombone? Or is it unrelated?
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harrison.t.reed
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« Reply #2 on: Jan 22, 2018, 09:36AM »

Seek medical advice from a medicine man. Most trombone players won't be able to give you real medical advice.

It would be reasonable to assume that if it hurts, and you're biting yourself, then you probably need some kind of dental work, but only a dentist would know.
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Edwards Tenor
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BGuttman
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« Reply #3 on: Jan 22, 2018, 10:16AM »

I'm hoping our resident dentist, ronkny, will chime in.  At least he's a practicing dentist and may be able to make better assessment of your picture.

It almost looks like you have a slightly off-center placement and the two teeth are moving into the mouthpiece cavity and there is an "indient" from the rim on an adjacent tooth.  But I'm no dentist and would leave analysis to those who are.
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Bruce Guttman
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Jhereg

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« Reply #4 on: Jan 22, 2018, 10:45AM »

You are not clear in your post, do you think your teeth are doing this because of how you play the trombone? Or is it unrelated?

I don't know if it's caused by the trombone, and not sure how I'd be able to tell that. I know that I've been playing an average of 800hrs per year for the past five years, it was a pretty intense playing situation, so IMO it's very possible that the playing has caused shifting.

Seek medical advice from a medicine man. Most trombone players won't be able to give you real medical advice.

It would be reasonable to assume that if it hurts, and you're biting yourself, then you probably need some kind of dental work, but only a dentist would know.

Yes, I agree. As I said, I posted here on the recommendation of another member (BGuttman) who thought others might be able to make suggestions or give advice based on personal experience. I will also of course visit a dentist.

I'm hoping our resident dentist, ronkny, will chime in.  At least he's a practicing dentist and may be able to make better assessment of your picture.

It almost looks like you have a slightly off-center placement and the two teeth are moving into the mouthpiece cavity and there is an "indient" from the rim on an adjacent tooth.  But I'm no dentist and would leave analysis to those who are.


Yeah, me too. I have a few months before insurance kicks in so no hurry.
The two front teeth have always overlapped a bit. What concerns me is the outward movement, which was not present 5 years ago.

Thanks for the feedback everybody.
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harrison.t.reed
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« Reply #5 on: Jan 22, 2018, 01:43PM »

Yeah, thanks Bruce. He knows the one dentist on here that is also a trombone player. Or is it the other way around?

Good luck! Hope he gets in touch with you.
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Edwards Tenor
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« Reply #6 on: Feb 13, 2018, 09:36AM »

I must reply...(your teeth look like Tom Cruise compared to mine!)

Really, they look fine to me. Very mild problems compared to some people, actually.

Please learn from my experience (do what I say!....not what I've done and neglected to do!)

- with tight teeth, floss and brush!!!!! And, use a toothpaste that has flouride (stannous flouride is supposed to be better)

- get your teeth cleaned regularly!!!

I've had very tight, crooked teeth my whole life, yet can play the trombone fine. Sure, you'll have to change mouthpieces once in awhile as you embouchure adapts to any shifts in dental structure, but that's par for the course even if you have perfect teeth.

I remember seeing late Rich Matteson play at a masterclass when I was in university (he came to our school.... (...don't know him? He was an amazing jazz euphonium player who taught jazz at North Texas State University....unbelievable player!)

Anyway, when he smiled, he looked like someone had hit him in the mouth with a baseball bat. He played on a Bach 6 1/2 AL and you'd never know he had anything 'out of place' once he started to play.

Moral of story....you'll still be able to play. Stay healthy, get your teeth cleaned, find a mouthpiece that works for you, and practice!
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