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The Trombone ForumCreation and PerformanceOther Musicians and Ensembles(Moderator: blast) Solo and chamber professional trombonists
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DaCapo

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« on: Jan 30, 2018, 09:36AM »

I'm looking to find out more information on players who are primarily making their living on solo and chamber music work in the trombone world. So if any of you guys could list some people that fall into this category I think that would be really cool. Thanks
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William Lang
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« Reply #1 on: Jan 30, 2018, 11:44AM »

i do, and also:
Matt Barbier, who is on the forum here
Ben Herrington
Michael Powell
John Rojak
Haim Avitsur
Dave Taylor
Mark Hetzler

to start the list of American trombonists - there's plenty more in Europe that i can come back to, but I have to run to teach now
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Matt K

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« Reply #2 on: Jan 30, 2018, 12:35PM »

Aren't most of those professors? I imagine that a lot of their income comes from that. Are you looking for non-academics DaCapo?
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William Lang
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« Reply #3 on: Jan 30, 2018, 02:15PM »

From what I've seen being a teacher is just a part of the industry now. the only person i've ever been aware of who had a solo career and no teaching post was Christian Lindberg. I also believe that everyone on that list makes the majority of their money not teaching - I know that's certainly true of anyone who holds an adjunct or per-student paying position, which i believe is everyone on that list outside of perhaps Mark Hetzler.

but that does beg an interesting question, and one I overlooked. if we add jazz artists (i was thinking classical due to the "chamber and solo" terminology tradtionaly relating to that field) then there might be many others for a list.
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DaCapo

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« Reply #4 on: Jan 31, 2018, 12:02AM »

Aren't most of those professors? I imagine that a lot of their income comes from that. Are you looking for non-academics DaCapo?
Yes, any and all.
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William Lang
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« Reply #5 on: Jan 31, 2018, 07:07AM »

Here's the entire non-teaching classical list:
Christian Lindberg

Everyone playing at a high enough level to play the occasional solo gigs and with chamber ensembles pads their living with teaching. There's just not enough opportunities for trombonists to make a good living just on solo and chamber touring yet.
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harrison.t.reed
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« Reply #6 on: Jan 31, 2018, 07:12AM »

It used to be Christian Lindberg. I think he is doing a much bigger haul conducting right now. There really should be a documentary of his early career done -- his career thru the early 2000s probably will never be comparably replicated.

I haven't heard of any making a living off of just soloing and no teaching, except for maybe the fact that Christopher Bill makes a bit off of YouTube these days. Is he teaching?

In the other dimension, there are of course Trombone Shorty and Nils Landgren, and others. Many trombonists fronting bands would fit the bill.
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mbarbier
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« Reply #7 on: Jan 31, 2018, 01:11PM »

Hey y'all!

Funny to see my name pop up on this one (but flattered to see my name with people I respect a ton)- I really make my living mostly playing new music, but that means chamber/solo as kind of a byproduct of a different goal...

 it's a messy question, that most who make a professional living don't have a clean answer. Very few Jazz players or orchestral players make their money solely from that (didn't JJ Johnson work for the gas company?). Maybe it's a question of focus since so many of us have so many 1099s every year?

I also really like the point Harrison brought up about people like Troy. He's certainly got a solo career. So does someone like Paul the Trombonist...

I think there are a few more options in Europe because of funding (so I can't speak to exactly how they make their living), but at least in the states pretty much everyone of every genre does a mix of things cause we're all freelancers.

I've got two college jobs (though I think anyone, especially my students would only call me professor as a joke), but they're maybe 1/4 to 1/2 of my income, depending on work load, which changes semester to semester. One place (LACC) is just straight ahead trombone, the other place, CalArts, is more new music/chamber music driven and playing in a faculty group is part of my contract, so it doesn't quite have a clean division from my performing income.

 I probably make near half (I don't really keep track) doing chamber and solo new music stuff, with a significant part coming from academic residencies with chamber groups (either my trombone duo or a mixed quartet I've got). That is often driven by comp programs that bring you into perform the music and help composers who kinda know what they're doing push things further, rather than teach them how a trombone works (which is why I don't consider it to really be part of my teaching income, but, like i said, the distinctions are messy). I also work part time in a wood and metal shop doing museum fabrication. It's less time now, but still a percentage.

Also in the States (with a big overlap of creative musics):
Steve Parker
Patrick Crossland
Weston Olencki
Andy Strain
Eric Starr
Felix Del Tradici



In Europe (much like here) most of the people I know are doing it from the new music side, so it's more narrow perspective.
Mike Svoboda
Uwe Dierkson
Andrew Digby
Steve Menotti
Kevin Austin
Jon Roskilly
and a number of others

There are also people like Canadian, Presido, and Empire (at one point) making most or a large amount of their living doing chamber music.
I'm sure I'm forgetting people too...

This next part is maybe a little bit off topic...The teaching thing is funny to me because, while it is a great source of income, a lot of people (myself included) do it because it's also an enjoyable thing to do and there's a real need to pass on the things you've been fortunate enough to have your teachers tell you (that you're still trying to sort out yourself!). I do think that a lot of players teach who don't need to, but want to. Joe Alessi or Jim Miller or a few dozen other top orchestral players don't have to teach to keep the lights on, but do teach because it's a vital part of the progression that we're all a part of and we all benefit from (Obviously they can make a good living doing just that so why not do both). At one point Jim was doing his job in the LA Phil and teaching at CalArts AND teaching at CSULB AND flying back to North Carolina to teach at NCSA weekly AND teaching private students (plus all the solo, jazz, Salsa, Session, etc stuff he does). You don't work like that when you've got a good job unless you've got an incredibly strong drive to teach....

anyway, rant over...just feels like often in these discussions teaching sometimes comes across as this everyone HAS to do it rather than a lot of people who don't have to do it really want to.
« Last Edit: Feb 01, 2018, 11:45AM by mbarbier » Logged
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