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The Trombone ForumCreation and PerformanceMusical Miscellany(Moderators: JP, BGuttman) 20 cellos compared in one minute
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robcat2075

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« on: Feb 10, 2018, 09:48AM »


Here are 20 mostly historic and pricey cellos quickly compared for tone.

No data available on bore sizes or mouthpieces used.

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/J777c0TfI0o" target="_blank">https://www.youtube.com/v/J777c0TfI0o</a>


Here is some date info.  Some of these are quite uncertain because the same name can run through several generations of makers.


Jean-Baptiste Vuillaume 1798 – 1875

Thomas Kennedy 1784–1870

Gagliano family early 1700s to 1860

William Forster (I, II or III?) active c.1750 -c.1850

Auguste Sébastien Philippe Bernardel père
1798 – 1870

Albert Caressa 1866 – 1939

Charles Boullangier (1823 – 1888)

Georges Chanot (III?) III 1831–1895

Thomas Kennedy

Gennaro Gagliano

Lockey Hill 1756 – 1810

Bernard Simon Fendt (II?) 1800 – 1852

18th Century French

Paul Francois Blanchard 1851 – 1912

Charles Claudot (II?)  1794-1876

John Lott (I?) 1776-1853

Claude-Augustin Miremont 1827-1887

Francoise Brugere c. later 19th Cent.

Nicolas Augustin Chappuy 1730 – 1784

French 1860



« Last Edit: Feb 11, 2018, 11:51AM by robcat2075 » Logged

Robert Holmén

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MikeBMiller
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« Reply #1 on: Feb 10, 2018, 06:42PM »

No Jin Bao?
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Posaunus
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« Reply #2 on: Feb 10, 2018, 08:57PM »

Is the bow cup-shaped or funnel-shaped? 

Is it the player or the instrument? 

(They all sound great to me - even the 1/8 size!) 

I love the sound of the cello!   
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« Reply #3 on: Feb 11, 2018, 12:45AM »

Looking forward to someone posting a trombone version (or versions).
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robcat2075

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« Reply #4 on: Feb 11, 2018, 11:55AM »

I've added date info and links at the top.

Many interesting careers, including an elephant trainer.

One bio said "his work tread the line between homage and forgery"
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Robert Holmén

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« Reply #5 on: Feb 11, 2018, 02:55PM »

What would one of those cellos cost?
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robcat2075

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« Reply #6 on: Feb 11, 2018, 03:25PM »

What would one of those cellos cost?

I don't know about those specific instruments but Vuillaumes and Gaglianos appear to approach $400,000 while a lesser-known but prolific maker like Blanchard runs in the $25,000+ range.
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« Reply #7 on: Feb 11, 2018, 03:31PM »

And we complain about the cost of a Shires?

I'm only sorry she didn't include a couple of more modern makers.

Most of them I couldn't hear a difference, but a couple seemed to have some different sound.

I assume she was using the same bow on all of them.
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« Reply #8 on: Feb 11, 2018, 07:11PM »

And we complain about the cost of a Shires?

I'm only sorry she didn't include a couple of more modern makers.


But who would buy a $250,000 cello after hearing a $5000 cello that sounded as good? (Actually, they would probably still want the $250,000 cello)


I got mine for $79. I would expect a $250,000 cello to sound 3164 times better but I don't think they do. Maybe they smell better.
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Robert Holmén

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« Reply #9 on: Feb 11, 2018, 07:15PM »

Nice post, beautiful sound...

Nanook
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« Reply #10 on: Feb 11, 2018, 07:40PM »

Given that cello players don't make any more money than trombone players, how does anyone afford a $400k cello?
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« Reply #11 on: Feb 11, 2018, 08:08PM »

Given that cello players don't make any more money than trombone players, how does anyone afford a $400k cello?

Someone owns it and loans it to you.  If you are a major soloist like Yo-Yo Ma you can arrange a loan to buy one.  It's no worse than buying a house (although you can't live in it ;-) ).

I'd love to get a $79 cello some time.  But I don't have the time to learn how to play it.
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« Reply #12 on: Feb 11, 2018, 09:13PM »

I will admit that the $79 did not include the glue to put it back together. 

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Robert Holmén

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« Reply #13 on: Feb 11, 2018, 10:21PM »

I will admit that the $79 did not include the glue to put it back together. 

Oops!   Don't know
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« Reply #14 on: Feb 15, 2018, 11:10PM »

Yikes, Rob!! But still (potentially) a steal at $79, if she plays alright Way cool I've been considering taking up violin... but I have too many issues in my brass and piano playing to feel like I should put time into yet another instrument  :/

It's interesting to me how blessed we are with brass. Even the absolute highest-end horns don't come CLOSE to the costs of some strings and wood winds (right? Not too many sackbuts out there that compare in "value" to some of the priciest antique string instruments?)

The fact that I can walk to one of my local music stores and pick up a mouthpiece for $40 that'll last me my WHOLE career, while reed players, saxes especially, are constantly buying, wearing out and breaking reeds and spending a good amount every year on new ones in addition to their mouthpieces costing oftentimes $50+ for decent student models, WITHOUT a ligature, is just remarkable in my opinion.
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« Reply #15 on: Feb 16, 2018, 03:17AM »

I would highly encourage you to take up a bowed string instrument, if for nothing else its a fantastic ear training exercise.
Its a totally different set of "muscles" so it can't hurt your trombone playing in any way.
And (for me) its way harder so it makes the trombone seem easy by comparison.

I also have a $75 cello I picked up on ebay from an "artist" who had painted a naked woman's body on the front & was trying to pass it off as a work of "art"
Within an hour of me receiving it I had stripped the paint off & I then repaired & refinished it & now it looks & plays beautifully!

I don't play nearly as well as Robcat- nicely done in your Youtube video- I especially like the sniff at the end!
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« Reply #16 on: Feb 16, 2018, 03:55PM »

Yikes, Rob!! But still (potentially) a steal at $79, if she plays alright Way cool I've been considering taking up violin... but I have too many issues in my brass and piano playing to feel like I should put time into yet another instrument  :/

It's interesting to me how blessed we are with brass. Even the absolute highest-end horns don't come CLOSE to the costs of some strings and wood winds (right? Not too many sackbuts out there that compare in "value" to some of the priciest antique string instruments?)

The fact that I can walk to one of my local music stores and pick up a mouthpiece for $40 that'll last me my WHOLE career, while reed players, saxes especially, are constantly buying, wearing out and breaking reeds and spending a good amount every year on new ones in addition to their mouthpieces costing oftentimes $50+ for decent student models, WITHOUT a ligature, is just remarkable in my opinion.

Indeed and trombonists are blessed among brass players because of instruments are also usually the cheapest.

You wouldn't find many antique trombones that are worth as much as antique string instrument, because very few of comparable age have survived, and fewer still are anywhere close to being in good playable condition. The vast majority are already owned by museums and have been for quite some time, and there is very little market and demand for them (if anything, because while most of the prestigious string instruments have been vastly modified and updated to modern set ups over the decades and centuries, it is not possible to make a historical trombone into a modern trombone) and very little prestige for rich people in owning them (nobody cares about trombones to start with, and almost none of the historical ones have been owned or played by any legendary or even recognizable name), so any attempt to put a price on them would be very arbitrary.
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« Reply #17 on: Feb 16, 2018, 08:18PM »

Wasn't Dillons trying to sell Arthur Pryor's trombone for $200k at one time?
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« Reply #18 on: Feb 16, 2018, 08:36PM »

The most expensive string instrument might not be the one you like the most. 40 years ago, I met a fiddle player (yes, he was a pro folk musician) who told me his violin cost $5K, and he liked it best of the ones he tried including a $40K one.

The bow is another matter. Bows can also cost a lot, and in cases more than the instrument.
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« Reply #19 on: Feb 16, 2018, 08:40PM »

I've been considering taking up violin...

Seriously... violin is for people who can start as children and still have bones mostly made of cartilage.

I've been an adult starter on both viola and cello.  Cello is way easier on the ergonomics.
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Robert Holmén

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