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The Trombone ForumHorns, Gear, and EquipmentMouthpieces(Moderators: BGuttman, Doug Elliott) How to get bright sound with full low register?
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timothy42b
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« Reply #20 on: Feb 14, 2018, 08:32AM »

Yesterday I recorded myself doing an octave lip slur, F above middle C to F in the staff. 

Oh wait, that would be  to 

I forgot we can do e-note-icons. 

I tried it first setting my chops carefully for the upper F and not allowing any motion.  The upper F was centered, the lower one came out dull and soft, didn't want to speak.  (That's what it sounded like to my ear, too, but I wanted to verify that was accurate.) 

Then I repeated it, starting on the upper F, retaining the set, but allowing the normal small mouthpiece motion, which for me is down and right to descend.  This is not resetting nor a shift, it's just an angle and pressure difference; the mouthpiece placement and chops set do not change.  Now the lower one came out bright and loud to my ear, and the recording confirmed that.  If I go too far it changes to blatty, and then eventually will just chip.  Actually in the low range what sounds edgy and bright to my ear sounds better on the recording. 
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Tim Richardson
CharlieB
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« Reply #21 on: Feb 14, 2018, 11:32AM »

Unless you've already done so, it might be good to try playing a different horn before you spend bucks on mouthpieces. Your "beat up old TR 602" might have things like dents, air leaks, or a partial obstruction in the slide crook that can do bad things to a horn's behavior. Maybe the TR is OK, but blowing a few notes on another horn (at your local music store?) would tell you if the TR needs help.


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reedman1
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« Reply #22 on: Feb 14, 2018, 11:02PM »

Unless you've already done so, it might be good to try playing a different horn before you spend bucks on mouthpieces. Your "beat up old TR 602" might have things like dents, air leaks, or a partial obstruction in the slide crook that can do bad things to a horn's behavior. Maybe the TR is OK, but blowing a few notes on another horn (at your local music store?) would tell you if the TR needs help.

Thanks. I donít think itís that bad, but Iíll try that when I have some free time.
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