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Author Topic: alto/tenor clef  (Read 4615 times)
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« on: Dec 12, 2004, 03:00PM »

This may be a really dumb question, but how would I play something thiat is in tenor clef? I normally play in bass clef. And I really have no idea how these clef things work.
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KHolz

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« Reply #1 on: Dec 12, 2004, 03:41PM »

Hey, it's not a dumb question!  Maybe the first step in understanding tenor clef is to know the lines and spaces.  The note names for the lines are d-f-a-c-e, and the spaces are e-g-b-d.  A really good book that helped me understand it a lot better than I could on my own is called "Introducing the Tenor Clef for Trombone" by Reginald Fink.  I would definately recomend it to you, as it is an easy and methodical approach to learning tenor clef.
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Kaitlyn

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« Reply #2 on: Dec 12, 2004, 04:30PM »

You might wish to try these online exercises:

http://www.teoria.com/exercises/reading.htm

http://www.emusictheory.com/drillCReading.html (check the "Settings" button at the top left)

http://www.musictheory.net/load.php?id=82 (click the "Settings" button to enable Alto or Tenor clef, and to disable Treble clef)

Here is a very nice description of the C clefs.

http://www.dolmetsch.com/musictheory14.htm#soprano
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Brian

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« Reply #3 on: Dec 12, 2004, 05:17PM »

I'm trying to play a song that's in tenor clef but I only know how to play in bass....

http://www.music.gsu.edu/facsturesources/brassdept/trombonelessonsCD/html%20pages/williamtell.html

that's the one...i just want to know how i would go about doing that.  Like what the notes equal in bass clef.
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BFW
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« Reply #4 on: Dec 12, 2004, 05:21PM »

Quote from: "grandiosobsessed"
that's the one...i just want to know how i would go about doing that.  Like what the notes equal in bass clef.


The best way to learn it is to learn to read the clef, not try to think "two lines/spaces down."  The tenor clef indicates middle C is on the fourth line; everything else follows from there.  (Middle C is one ledger line above the staff in bass clef.)
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Brian

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« Reply #5 on: Dec 12, 2004, 05:28PM »

But how am I supposed to learn the clef if I don't know what the notes are?  I am confused........ I know that the bottom line is D, but what is that in bass clef?
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Daniel

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« Reply #6 on: Dec 12, 2004, 05:33PM »

It sounds like you may need a better understanding of what the notes in bass clef mean.  When you see     , do you think "F" or do you think "first position"?  Get used to thinking of notes in terms of music instead of simply trombone, if that makes any sense at all.

Once you realize this, playing in tenor/alto/treble/mezzo-soprano/whatever clef is really quite easy.
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Daniel
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« Reply #7 on: Dec 12, 2004, 05:46PM »

i think both...so now i just need to know what the notes are in the other clef. Like the D on the bottom line, which D is it?
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« Reply #8 on: Dec 12, 2004, 06:02PM »

Quote from: "grandiosobsessed"
i think both...so now i just need to know what the notes are in the other clef. Like the D on the bottom line, which D is it?


It's this D:  

I mentioned that middle C,   , was the fourth line on the tenor staff.  Everything else follows:

E  
C     =  
A     =  
F     =  
D     =  
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Brian

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« Reply #9 on: Dec 12, 2004, 06:30PM »

oh........i understand now...THANK YOU!
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David Gross
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« Reply #10 on: Dec 13, 2004, 04:03AM »

The William Tell exerpt is really difficult and it comes up a lot in auditions. I played that once in an orchestra and I never did get it right. This one separates the men from the boys, and I confess to falling in the "boy" category.

My orchestra had the parts in bass and tenor clefs. Luckily, I preferred the tenor clef part because the bass clef part had a wrong note or two.
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Dave

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