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Author Topic: Mouthpiece vs. Instrument  (Read 5334 times)
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« on: Jan 03, 2004, 02:49PM »

This question seems so general that I thought this would be the best place to get answers.  My recent post was on the Instruments forum, in which I asked about what the differences are in bore and bell sizes, and metallic content.  Then I thought about the significance of the mouthpiece.  Does the mouthpiece make more difference in the sound characteristics than the rest of the instrument?
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Brandon Natelli
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« Reply #1 on: Jan 03, 2004, 03:06PM »

Good question!  My guess would be that the instrument makes more a difference.  But mouth piece does make a hugh difference.  Try it out!  Take the mouthpiece you are using then try out different horns at a music store.  Then ask for a different mouth piece, and do the same! They might get upset when you don't buy anything though...
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« Reply #2 on: Jan 03, 2004, 03:14PM »

Brandon, your right and wrong at the same time.  IMHO I feel that the mouthpiece makes as much difference as the horn does, that might be why you see players constantly changing mouthpieces, plus the cost factor.  

Take your current horn and go to the music store and try out lots of mouthpieces and notice how each one makes you SOUND, not how it feels.  As Arnold Jacobs once said "Play by sound, not feel"

Later
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Steve

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« Reply #3 on: Jan 03, 2004, 03:34PM »

all those factors make a difference, some more subtle than others. In my experience, bore size differences can be very noticeable, and mouthpiece differences depend on how much of a change you make. go from a 12C to a 4G and you will really notice it. (not that I would ever recommend making such a huge change) Go from a 5g to a 4g and it would be more subtle. That being said, a lot can be done to improve on sound by the player himself (or herself). just make sure whatever it is that you don't like about your sound is really caused by the equipment you are working with before you go changing. talk to your teacher first.
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« Reply #4 on: Jan 03, 2004, 04:57PM »

I had to try out a huge number of mouthpieces before I settled on two pieces for my large bore, three for my small bore, and two for my euphonium.  I almost always play the same one for each instrument, but I do leave myself with options.  I'd say that I think the mouthpiece makes about as much difference as the instrument.
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« Reply #5 on: Jan 04, 2004, 01:35AM »

Hi 88-keys,
     everything makes a difference. But as always the most impact is from the player. I believe that if you take a really good player, he could make a beautiful tone on just about anything.

In my experience, the instrument makes more difference than the mouthpiece. I can try any mouthpiece on my bass trombone, from my 5 down to a 1, and it still will not sound like my standard size King 3b.

And I guess that if you take a really good player, he could make a beutiful tone on just about anything you could throw at him. As for me, my best combination would not get me a pro job anywhere.

The sense-morale of this is that the player makes more difference than the equipment.

Gunnar Hellquist
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Andy L
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« Reply #6 on: Jan 04, 2004, 08:52AM »

I have very little experience in changing equipment, but to me the mouthpiece has a lot more to do with comfort than with sound.  The different mouthpieces I've tried haven't so much changed my sound as they have changed my level of comfort while playing.  I'm still looking for that "magic" mouthpiece that will feel like it's specifically molded for my lips.  I'm afraid it doesn't exist though...
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« Reply #7 on: Jan 04, 2004, 09:10AM »

Greetings to all and happy new year...

I beleive that the most noticable difference  you can notice is when you acheive a combination of trombone and mouthpiece that makes you sound good and feel comfortable... The choice of gear I play was made mostly on how I felt with it... that is true  for both my trombone and my mouthpiece... It doesn't mean there isn't something out there I haven't tried yet that isn't better than what I play now, because it is always an ongoing process for some of us... for others, if it works the it is... why change it???

As far as the mouthpiece is concerned, keep in mind that it's the first thing next to your lips that helps create the sound... you just can't minimize the importance of that...
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Brandon Natelli
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« Reply #8 on: Jan 04, 2004, 09:28AM »

James, this constant change of mouthpieces you mention.  Are these players playing on similiar mouthpieces?  Or are they playing on completely different mouthpieces.  I do believe that both factors are true.  The reason I said horn though is there are more varibles on the horn then the mouthpiece.  Not by much though.
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« Reply #9 on: Jan 04, 2004, 10:03PM »

quote:
Originally posted by Brandon Natelli:
James, this constant change of mouthpieces you mention.  Are these players playing on similiar mouthpieces?  Or are they playing on completely different mouthpieces.

I've seen players doing both.
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