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Author Topic: Beginner  (Read 9862 times)
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« on: Dec 30, 2003, 06:04AM »

Hello,
     I'm a 47 year old with 30 years of guitar and bass playing experience.  I received a trombone for Christmas.  I don't read music very well (yet.)  Is there a chance I could learn to play the thing?  I've never played a brass or reed instrument.  I can put it together is about all.  I've looked on the internet for beginner sites but they're already beyond me.  Where do I start?  Any suggestions?
Thanks
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harmonslide
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« Reply #1 on: Dec 30, 2003, 07:03AM »

Pretty much anyone can learn. Probably with the years of musical experience already, you'll progress faster than someone who has started on trombone; you already know the basics of music, so you don't need to sit there for a half hour trying to decipher 'three blind mice' and what those black circles with sticks on them are; you can focus more on the trombone itself.

Enjoy the trombone!

What kind is it? Brand, model # (if that's on it)?
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Brandon Natelli
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« Reply #2 on: Dec 30, 2003, 07:17AM »

There are some method books out there that may be a great help just starting. The Rochut collection is great for starting.  Start with Beginner.  You can probably breeze through the book.  But the biggest suggest would be to get a teacher.  Swallow your pride and you can even get a high school student for pretty cheap that can show you the ropes.  There are tons of resources on this site that will also help.  If you are not looking to spend any money...  E-mail me and I will write up some stuff for you.  Not a lot, and it might take sometime.  But a simple start is something.    For a lot of beginners I recomend that you just play around for awhile.  Get to know your horn a bit.  Then once you are comfortable with it we will fix everything to fit propper tech.
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« Reply #3 on: Dec 30, 2003, 07:18AM »

quote:
Is there a chance I could learn to play the thing?
Of course there is!    

 
quote:
 Where do I start?  
Find a private teacher.  Also, picking up something like Essential Elements 2000 would be a good start.  A month or two in get Bordner's First Book of Practical studies for trombone.  But the private teacher is the key, IMO.

- Dan Hine
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« Reply #4 on: Dec 30, 2003, 07:20AM »

quote:
For a lot of beginners I recomend that you just play around for awhile.
Yikes!    That sounds like a bad idea to me.  You're just begging them to start bad habits that will be difficult to get out of later on.
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Steve McGovern
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« Reply #5 on: Dec 30, 2003, 07:31AM »

All the people telling you to get a private teacher are right on the money.  Don't bother buying method books from our suggestions -- if the teacher is worth anything he will have his own opinions on what you should be getting.

So how do you find a reputable private teacher?  That's a good question.  Talk to local high-school band directors, and find out who they reccomend (or who teaches their top students).  Talk to the people at the local music store -- not the guitars 'n drums store -- the other one.      .  With the band instruments in the window.

Also, think about your goals with the trombone.  Most students' studies lead them toward the classical realm (concert band & orcehstra, and classical solos).  If you want to use the trombone only to supplement, say, a rock band, mention this to teachers -- some may have more trouble with the idea than others.
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« Reply #6 on: Dec 30, 2003, 07:42AM »

Folks,
     Thanks to all that have replied.  I don't live in a big city but there is a couple of local high school bands, a local big band and a couple of instrument stores.  I should be able to find someone to give lessons.  It sounds like fun.  In the meantime, are there any good web sites to get me started?  I haven't had time to look at the OTJ yet.
Thanks again.
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BFW
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« Reply #7 on: Dec 30, 2003, 08:05AM »

I agree with those who suggest a private teacher, or even group lessons.  Some web sites that might offer useful information:

http://www.trombonelessons.com/
http://www.trbnplyr.com/

 
quote:
Originally posted by Brandon Natelli:
The Rochut collection is great for starting.  Start with Beginner.  You can probably breeze through the book.  

I completely disagree.  The Rochut collection is absolutely not for someone who is just starting on the instrument, as it requires knowledge of keys and rhythms, good reading skills, and significant high range development.

I suggest a good method book.  The Ernest Clarke method book is the one I used, but there are many others; your local music store may have copies of the band method book used by your local school bands; these are usually good.

But a teacher, who can show you how to do things and who can observe what you are doing, is quite important, particularly in the early stages.
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Brian

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« Reply #8 on: Dec 30, 2003, 06:22PM »

Welcome to the wonderful world of trombone!

First of all, one method book that a lot of teachers wouldn't mind seeing you with is an Arban's. The new edition is pricey ($50), but it's got a wide variety of exercises that could be of benefit to you. Talk to a potential teacher and ask what they think. Secondly, some of those instrument stores might have brass teachers on staff to give lessons throughout the day. My local stores do, and they're more than willing to teach adults as well. Or maybe there is a professor at a college nearby, as well.
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Joe Guarr
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« Reply #9 on: Dec 31, 2003, 04:12AM »

quote:
Originally posted by bigboyfreese:
In the meantime, are there any good web sites to get me started?

Stay right here. The OTJ is the best "getting started" site I know of.
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« Reply #10 on: Dec 31, 2003, 08:01AM »

quote:
Originally posted by BFW:
I agree with those who suggest a private teacher, or even group lessons.  Some web sites that might offer useful information:

 http://www.trombonelessons.com/
 http://www.trbnplyr.com/

 
quote:
Originally posted by Brandon Natelli:
The Rochut collection is great for starting.  Start with Beginner.  You can probably breeze through the book.  

I completely disagree.  The Rochut collection is absolutely not for someone who is just starting on the instrument, as it requires knowledge of keys and rhythms, good reading skills, and significant high range development.

I suggest a good method book.  The Ernest Clarke method book is the one I used, but there are many others; your local music store may have copies of the band method book used by your local school bands; these are usually good.

But a teacher, who can show you how to do things and who can observe what you are doing, is quite important, particularly in the early stages.

He says he has the background in gutiar.  That should be just fine for rhythmn and keys.  I disagree with the reading skills.  And range developement should be fine.  I started on the Rochut then moved to the Arban's.  With no knowledge of reading music or anything before hitting it.  The Rochut forces you to advance and not be lazy.

 
quote:
picking up something like Essential Elements 2000
I do not like this book, it is slow...  And can promote reading by positions and not notes.
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BFW
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« Reply #11 on: Dec 31, 2003, 08:39AM »

quote:
Originally posted by Brandon Natelli:
He says he has the background in gutiar.  That should be just fine for rhythmn and keys.

He says he does not read music very well (yet); that's what I'm basing my comments on.

I am surprised that you started with Rochut, but if so, then fine and I'm impressed.  I didn't get above the staff for a few weeks, I didn't know all seven positions for a few weeks, and certainly didn't have a high A until several months into my training, and I was a very proficient reader with a background on trumpet.  Bordogni (Rochut) you need a high A immediately (and all seven positions, and multiple sharp keys).  I did Bordogni my third year, from Keith Brown's collection, not Rochut's.  But I don't like the Bordogni exercises, so perhaps my bias is showing.
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Brian

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« Reply #12 on: Dec 31, 2003, 02:03PM »

Doesn't the very first Rochut etude have a high "A" in it? That sounds terribly high for a beginner. I would strongly suggest the private teacher route.
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« Reply #13 on: Dec 31, 2003, 07:52PM »

I apologize greatly.  I meant Rubunk, not Rochut.      I'll shut up now...
(Sorry Evan, can understand the confusion.  Rochut is way to hard)
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« Reply #14 on: Dec 31, 2003, 08:50PM »

quote:
Originally posted by zemry:
Doesn't the very first Rochut etude have a high "A" in it? That sounds terribly high for a beginner. I would strongly suggest the private teacher route.

What does this grading scale mean? Can someone explain it?
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« Reply #15 on: Dec 31, 2003, 10:14PM »

I don't believe it is a grading scale Joey.  High A is refering to the note.  High A        an octave above this.
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« Reply #16 on: Jan 01, 2004, 06:24AM »

quote:
Originally posted by Brandon Natelli:
I apologize greatly.  I meant Rubunk, not Rochut.

Ah, yes, Rubank; good book!  
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Brian

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« Reply #17 on: Jan 05, 2004, 06:18AM »

It's never too late to start... Welcome in the world of slides, embouchure, positions, greases/oils/lubricants and all other problems relates to this amazing nice brassy/shinny/wonderful instrument...

As far as starting late is concerned, I got my trombone 2 years ago... right now I'm starting my 3rd semester at Sherbrooke's University doing a double Bachelor's degree in music teaching and performance... and I'm 36 years old... so it's never too late to start.

THe best way to thame the beast is to get a good private teacher. There isn't a absolute method. All teachers I know will work with a variety of books (Arban, Rochut, Remington, Herring, Conconne, Kopprash, Rubank and many more...)

I beleive a good teacher that works with a synthesis of the different books is the best way to get started...

Good Luck,
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« Reply #18 on: Jan 05, 2004, 07:03AM »

Thanks for the reply Gee.
I'm a working stiff so I'm just a weekend warrior type musician.  I appreciate the great responses I've gotten on this website.  Not all sites are this helpful to beginners.  I'm looking forward to the world of the 'bone.  I don't expect to lead the parade in New Orleans but if I can slide out a few melodies I'll be happy.
Thanks again.
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« Reply #19 on: Jan 08, 2004, 12:50PM »

My initial thought was: playing guitar for 30 years and can't read music?  at least not well?  I don't thing anybody that can't read music for a guitar would find the going any easier playing a trombone.

I played guitar for nearly 30 years before I picked up a trombone for the first time.  It was so hard to make any tone come out at all!  At least the first time I tried to play a saxophone, I could put something like a scale together within 5 minutes.  I was able to make a feeble tone on the trombone, which was more than I could get out of a trumpet!  I couldn't get anything at all to come out of the trumpet, so decided to try trombone instead of a trumpet.  The fact that a trombone does not use transposed music, clinched it for me.

With a beginning band method book and Bundy trombone I started trying to play the exersizes.  Then I got lazy and picked up the bass guitar and went through every exersize like a hot knife through butter!  At least I knew about what I was supposed to be playing.  The straight tenor trombone uses the same range of written music as a bass guitar!

A couple of years later: Now the biggest drawback with playing trombone is I can't sing and play at the same time.      I am not a concert master, but I can play some tunes.
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