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Author Topic: First Horn: Bach 36 or 42??  (Read 3284 times)
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MXu

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« on: Sep 21, 2005, 09:39PM »

So yeah, I've played both of these and I love how they both play (compared to my student rental pos)

I want to get the open wrap of either, theyre both the same price for me.  Which one is more reccomended? I currently play in a symphonic band, but I want this horn to last me a lifetime if possible, or at least until the end of college (I'm a junior in High School right now). I've heard the 36 is more versatile, but is the 42 better in terms of sound?

My teacher reccomends the 42, but I don't know if it's going to be able to multitask like the 36 can (or so I hear). What say you?
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foobunny
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« Reply #1 on: Sep 22, 2005, 04:25AM »

I'd recommend getting the 42. It plays every bit as well as the 36, and it has a much better sound quality to it, so I'd say to go with the 42.
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Bonedisorder

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« Reply #2 on: Sep 22, 2005, 06:18AM »

I go with the 42, well I would really buy a 50, but that is a differant story.
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Anthony Triplett
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« Reply #3 on: Sep 22, 2005, 06:45AM »

If you're planning on doing just classical music, then go with the 42. However, if you plan on doing both jazz and classical, I would consider the 36. With the right mouthpieces, a 36 can fit both venues very well. (For example - a 5GS for classical and 6 1/2 or touch smaller for jazz)
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Woolworth

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« Reply #4 on: Sep 22, 2005, 06:56AM »

The 36 is more versatile.  You can play it in any setting without compromise.  

The 42 is great for most solo work, symphony, band and as a sub for bass trombone in a big band.  It's not so good for combo or the top three chairs in a big band.  It might be a little heavy for brass quintet, depending on the other players.

Bigger isn't always better, and neither is more expensive.

Bottom line, if you're going to specialize in a particular idiom, buy the horn that's right for it.  If you want variety and can only afford one pro horn, get the one that allows you maximum versatility.  Don't discount the idea of getting two (or three) good used horns.  They'll pay off in the long run.
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Rich Woolworth
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David Schwartz

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« Reply #5 on: Sep 22, 2005, 02:00PM »

I vote for 36.  I've played 42-sized horns since I was your age.  42 has a bigger sound, but there are times and places when the trombone timbre disappears behind the tenor saxes in big band or behind the cellos in orchestra.  The 36 is more likely to sound bright and clear and quick-respondng, never mushy, even at soft volumes.
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David A. Schwartz, Belmont, Massachusetts
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mwpfoot
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« Reply #6 on: Sep 22, 2005, 02:05PM »

Of these two, I'd recommend a 36, for reasons already stated above.

Additionally, I've always felt than when you need a 42 or larger sized horn, you'll know it and you'll understand exactly why you need it.

 Good!
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MXu

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« Reply #7 on: Sep 22, 2005, 02:22PM »

Well, I'm not sure. I liked the bigger sound of the 42, and I do mostly play in like medium sized bands.

I feel like later in college, I'm going to want a bigger horn, and I'll be like "doh should've gotten a 547" whereas if I get the 42 and need a smaller horn, well, it just doesn't seem as bad a situation.
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mwpfoot
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« Reply #8 on: Sep 22, 2005, 02:28PM »

Quote from: "MXu"
I feel like later in college, I'm going to want a bigger horn, and I'll be like "doh should've gotten a 547" whereas if I get the 42 and need a smaller horn, well, it just doesn't seem as bad a situation.

Well, now it sounds like you may know what you need already!

Yes, you can always find an old Olds, Conn, King, etc. on the cheap for big band and other playing where your 42 might be too symphonic. There is no perfect horn that covers every genre, so why not get two? Or... I dunno... five!
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The Guardian
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« Reply #9 on: Sep 22, 2005, 04:34PM »

Ironically I had gotten a 42 in high school, and when I got to college I wished I had gotten the 36!
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Bass Trombone, Guelph Symphony Orchestra
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« Reply #10 on: Sep 22, 2005, 06:23PM »

I play on a 42 and love it!  I mostly play it in wind ensemble, brass quintet, and marching band.  Really the only thing that i use a smaller horn for is for the lead part in jazz band.  The 42 is a great horn and I feel like I can use it for me than if I would have gotten the 36.
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David Gross
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« Reply #11 on: Sep 22, 2005, 06:37PM »

My twins both went for Bachs. The one that became a music major went for the Bach 36. The computer scientist went for the Bach 42.

The 36 requires less air, hence it is a bit easier to play.
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Dave

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HuskerTX

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« Reply #12 on: Sep 22, 2005, 11:49PM »

42.

You'll find that in your symphonic playing you'd really want a full symphony bore tenor.

Get a small horn for cheap later.

Tenor trombone players are just not people that can effectively use one horn for everything. In fact, brass players in general are like that.
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Slidennis

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« Reply #13 on: Sep 23, 2005, 01:17AM »

88h...

The day you need to have more core and a little brighter sound, you'd just buy another slide SL2525, .525"...
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Denis
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« Reply #14 on: Sep 23, 2005, 03:35AM »

If both you and your teacher like the 42, go for it!  When you play lead in a jazz band, though, you may want the sound of a .500 or .508, not a 36.
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David A. Schwartz, Belmont, Massachusetts
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Steve

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« Reply #15 on: Sep 23, 2005, 04:23AM »

Quote from: "ABinkard"
42.


Get a small horn for cheap later.

Tenor trombone players are just not people that can effectively use one horn for everything. In fact, brass players in general are like that.


I agree that in the long run, you'll probably greatly benefit from just having more than one horn. I use a small and a large tenor on a regular basis.
i'm just curious why everyone always seems to want to go cheap on the small horn.. as if it's not worth the same investment? or am I just imagining this trend?
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Woolworth

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« Reply #16 on: Sep 23, 2005, 05:14AM »

Quote from: "Steve"

i'm just curious why everyone always seems to want to go cheap on the small horn.. as if it's not worth the same investment? or am I just imagining this trend?


I think what we're saying is, look for a good, inexpensive, used horn.  There are lots of 3B's and 2B's (and the like) around.  I always recommend saving money on a horn and investing it in private lessons.
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Rich Woolworth
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Slidennis

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« Reply #17 on: Sep 23, 2005, 05:53AM »

Quote from: "Woolworth"
Quote from: "Steve"

i'm just curious why everyone always seems to want to go cheap on the small horn.. as if it's not worth the same investment? or am I just imagining this trend?


I think what we're saying is, look for a good, inexpensive, used horn.  There are lots of 3B's and 2B's (and the like) around.  I always recommend saving money on a horn and investing it in private lessons.

You've just said it, "Lots of 3B's and 2B's around" not "lots of 42 or 88H around".... ;-)
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Denis
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« Reply #18 on: Sep 23, 2005, 12:21PM »

Lots of folks try and compromise and get an "all purpose horn".  There are all purpose players, but not all purpose horns.  Lots of used 36s due to this.  While I think a 36 is a very nice symphonic instrument I know of quite a few folks that felt pressure (real or imagined) to get a "real symphonic horn".  

So get what plays the best for your playing now.  Add appropriate instruments as needed.
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John Sandhagen,
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Thomas Matta

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« Reply #19 on: Sep 23, 2005, 03:33PM »

I think the 36 is a great instrument, especially without the f-attachment.

The 42-B is a great horn too. Refresh my memory - is there a 42-B available with a detachable valve section?

If you like a straight tenor, either the 36 or 42 will do - differently, of course,

If you prefer an f-attachment, the 42-B is the way to go.
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Thomas Matta
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