Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length

 
Advanced search

1092544 Posts in 72173 Topics- by 19438 Members - Latest Member: Messing
Jump to:  
The Trombone ForumCreation and PerformanceTrombonists(Moderator: zemry) Trombone Players with really good tone quality
Pages: 1 2 3 4 [All]   Go Down
Print
Author Topic: Trombone Players with really good tone quality  (Read 16042 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
amnesiavivace
*
Offline Offline

Location:
Joined: Oct 24, 2005
Posts: 15

View Profile
« on: Nov 02, 2005, 08:40PM »

Can anyone suggest any living, classical trombone players with amazing tone quality that i can listen to?  I already listen to Alessi a lot.

Thanks
Logged
ivanandrade

*
Offline Offline

Location: pittsburgh, PA
Joined: Sep 2, 2003
Posts: 758

View Profile
« Reply #1 on: Nov 02, 2005, 09:11PM »

Quote from: "amnesiavivace"
Can anyone suggest any living, classical trombone players with amazing tone quality that i can listen to?  I already listen to Alessi a lot.

Thanks


Jorgen Van Rijen
Michel Bequet
Christian Lindberg
Steve Witser
Scott Hartman
Mark Lawrence
Nitzan Haroz

Group:
The New Trombone Collective
Paris Trombone Quartet
London Trombone Sound
Four of a Kind
Logged
Thomas Matta

*
Offline Offline

Location: Chicago
Joined: Feb 12, 2005
Posts: 7150

View Profile WWW
« Reply #2 on: Nov 02, 2005, 11:05PM »

Charlie Vernon.

Simply an amazing model of sound, whether you are a tenor or bass player. Heck, any instrumentalist can get something from his sound!
Logged

Thomas Matta
Associate Professor of Jazz Studies, DePaul University
www.tommattabigband.com
Ari

*
Offline Offline

Location: Iceland
Joined: Apr 1, 2005
Posts: 481

View Profile
« Reply #3 on: Nov 03, 2005, 03:50AM »

I would like to add Alain Trudel
Logged

"Music doesn´t take time, it takes place in time."
Stefan Solyom
Bonedisorder

*
Offline Offline

Location: Philadelphia, PA
Joined: Jun 1, 2005
Posts: 89

View Profile
« Reply #4 on: Nov 03, 2005, 07:01AM »

Randy Hawes of the Detroit Symphony
Logged

Anthony Triplett
Tenor/ Bass/ Tuba
Philadelphia, PA
JacobGarchik

*
Offline Offline

Location: Brooklyn, NY
Joined: Aug 30, 2005
Posts: 360
"NYC Freelancer and omnivore"


View Profile WWW
« Reply #5 on: Nov 03, 2005, 08:34AM »

Dave Taylor
Stewart Dempster
David Finlayson
Vinko Globokar
Benny Sluchin
Kiril Ribarski

Listening to records for sound is good. Listening to a concert is even better. Sitting in a small room with someone playing in your face is best.
Logged

mrbasstrombone
*
Offline Offline

Location: Worthing, West Sussex, England
Joined: Oct 21, 2005
Posts: 32

View Profile WWW
« Reply #6 on: Nov 03, 2005, 08:40AM »

Dave Stewart  - Bass Trombone
Richard Edwards - Tenor & Bass!
Logged

'If you don't enjoy it, don't do it. Life's not that complicated'
www.davidoflynn.com
Paul Martin
*
Offline Offline

Location: Chicago, IL
Joined: Oct 24, 2002
Posts: 2556

View Profile
« Reply #7 on: Nov 03, 2005, 02:31PM »

Jim Markey
Logged
Bruce Solomon
*
Offline Offline

Location: Philadelphia
Joined: May 3, 2002
Posts: 154

View Profile WWW
« Reply #8 on: Nov 04, 2005, 05:31PM »

Henry Smith-former principal of the Philadelphia orchestra under Eugene ormandy
Glenn D0dson-former Principal of the Philadelphia Orchestra-from Ormandy threough 1995 under Sawallisch
The Late Robert S. Harper--former Bass trombone of the Philadelphia Orchestra on all the Ormandy recordings
Logged

"At no time will your lips ever leave your face"
poozer

*
Offline Offline

Location:
Joined: Feb 20, 2005
Posts: 480

View Profile
« Reply #9 on: Nov 21, 2005, 01:36PM »

Orchestral tenor players -
Dudley Bright (LSO, previously in the Philharmonia Orchestra)
Derek James (Previously of the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra)
Arthur Wilson (Dudley Bright's predecessor in the Philharmonia)
Henry Hardy (particularly while at the Royal Scottish National Orchestra)

Orchestral bass players -
Ray Premru, my personal favourite
Bob Hughes (LSO)

Jazz/commercial trombonists -
Frank Rosolino
Dick Nash
George Roberts

Being a fellow bass player, Ray Premru's playing has the most influence on me. However, there are aspects of others listed above that I draw on in other situations. For example, Henry Hardy and Derek James were terrifically exciting players, while Arthur Wilson always played with a lovely refinement and elegance. When playing jazz or lighter styles of music, I like Frank Rosolino's vibrato and Dick Nash's smoothness.

Just goes to show that it's nice to have a great sound AND know what to do with it, just like George Roberts said.

Yours,
Chris
Logged

In tune, in time, with an appropriate sense of sound and style...
poozer

*
Offline Offline

Location:
Joined: Feb 20, 2005
Posts: 480

View Profile
« Reply #10 on: Nov 21, 2005, 01:39PM »

Oooops, just noticed that the thread ask for LIVING players.

Ray Premru and Frank Rosolino are sadly no longer with us, though their recorded legacies live on. I'm not sure if Dick Nash is still playing, retired or deceased.

Yours,
Chris
Logged

In tune, in time, with an appropriate sense of sound and style...
blast

*
*
Offline Offline

Location: scotland
Joined: Jul 26, 2001
Posts: 7039
"Bass/Contrabass trombone, Scottish Opera."


View Profile
« Reply #11 on: Nov 21, 2005, 03:27PM »

Only live listening should count.....you have to REALLY hear a sound.
I'll second Derek James....I heard him in the LPO when I was a student, and was lucky enough to work with him a couple of times in the Royal Philharmonic.....Just stunning in every way.
Denis Wick.....playing at piano in Mahler two....magic.
Bill Reichenbach......velvet from two feet away.
Ben van Dijk.....THE orchestra sound.
Bob Hughes....CLASSIC bassbone.
Dave Taylor....LOTS of sounds.
Mark Nightingale....personal sounds.
So many more...
Chris Stearn.
Logged

Still cannot think of anything better to do. Back on an old 1 1/2G again !
BoneyW
*
Offline Offline

Location: The Netherlands
Joined: Jan 8, 2002
Posts: 2004

View Profile
« Reply #12 on: Nov 22, 2005, 01:44AM »

Jorgen van Rijen, fabulous tone Good!
Logged
timothy42b
*
Offline Offline

Location: Colonial Heights, Virginia, US
Joined: Dec 7, 2000
Posts: 12462

View Profile
« Reply #13 on: Nov 22, 2005, 03:18AM »

Doug Wright.  Classic sound, and the cleanest articulation of them all.
Logged

Tim Richardson
Sinfonia98

*
Offline Offline

Location: Lafayette, LA
Joined: Mar 12, 2004
Posts: 7377
"Back Home!!!!"


View Profile
« Reply #14 on: Nov 22, 2005, 01:03PM »

Mark Lawrence - Tenor
Stefan Sanders - Bass
Jay Friedman - Tenor
Brett Baker - Tenor
Brandt Attema - Bass
Jim Pugh - Tenor
Phil Wilson - Tenor
Doug Yeo - Bass
George Roberts - Bass
Mark Nightingale - tenor
Logged

Beau

"If at first you don't succeed, you're obviously not Chuck Norris."
Duffle
*
Offline Offline

Location:
Joined: Apr 7, 2005
Posts: 2903

View Profile
« Reply #15 on: Nov 23, 2005, 08:37AM »

Quote from: "poozer"
Orchestral tenor players -
Dudley Bright (LSO, previously in the Philharmonia Orchestra)
Derek James (Previously of the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra)
Arthur Wilson (Dudley Bright's predecessor in the Philharmonia)
Henry Hardy (particularly while at the Royal Scottish National Orchestra)

Orchestral bass players -
Ray Premru, my personal favourite
Bob Hughes (LSO)

Jazz/commercial trombonists -
Frank Rosolino
Dick Nash
George Roberts

Being a fellow bass player, Ray Premru's playing has the most influence on me. However, there are aspects of others listed above that I draw on in other situations. For example, Henry Hardy and Derek James were terrifically exciting players, while Arthur Wilson always played with a lovely refinement and elegance. When playing jazz or lighter styles of music, I like Frank Rosolino's vibrato and Dick Nash's smoothness.

Just goes to show that it's nice to have a great sound AND know what to do with it, just like George Roberts said.

Yours,
Chris


Some great players there. I would also like to add John Iveson and Chris Mowat. Both players with fantastic sounds and great musicians into the bargain.
Logged
Posaune

*
Offline Offline

Location: Monument, CO
Joined: Jul 29, 2005
Posts: 257

View Profile
« Reply #16 on: Nov 23, 2005, 10:23AM »

The principal with the Milwaukee Symphony, Megumi Kanda, has a spectacular sound.  She has a recoring out, the sad thing is she tries to play When the Saints go Marching In with awful results.  DO NOT listen to her for jazz.....  Spectacular classical player though.
Logged

"anything to stupid to be said is sung"-- Voltaire
Student at the Oberlin Conservatory
Anthony

*
Offline Offline

Location: North Yorkshire
Joined: Oct 1, 2000
Posts: 1342

View Profile
« Reply #17 on: Nov 28, 2005, 11:04AM »

I'll third Derek James, i have a couple of recordings with him on and they are phenomenal.  tutors of mine have sat next to him in the orchestra and cannot say enough.  Amazing playing.  Truly phenomenal.
Logged

Anthony
djdekok

*
Offline Offline

Location: Norristown PA
Joined: Sep 25, 2001
Posts: 4140
"Monsters Eat Whiny Children"


View Profile WWW
« Reply #18 on: Nov 28, 2005, 06:15PM »

not to brag, but my section in Orchestra la Paz...I get chills just thinking about it!
Logged

Daniel De Kok
Associate Principal, Southeastern Pennsylvania Symphony Orchestra
B.M. Michigan
M.M. Western Michigan
M.S.L.S. Clarion
Dan H.
He doesn't know how to put this, but he's kind of a big deal

*
Offline Offline

Location: Saratoga Springs / Potsdam, NY
Joined: Apr 16, 2003
Posts: 2600
"Conquer the devils with a little thing called love"


View Profile WWW
« Reply #19 on: Nov 28, 2005, 06:38PM »

Quote from: "Thomas Matta"
Charlie Vernon.

Simply an amazing model of sound, whether you are a tenor or bass player. Heck, any instrumentalist can get something from his sound!


Absolutely. When he plays, it is like having a nice, warm blanket over you!
Logged

- Daniel Havranek
SchuylkillCountyBoner

*
Offline Offline

Location: Auburn, Pennsylvania
Joined: Jun 9, 2004
Posts: 682

View Profile
« Reply #20 on: Nov 28, 2005, 07:18PM »

I will second Sinfonia's response of Jim Pugh.  The New York Pops just came into the area and did a Tribute to the Dorseys and a tribute to Skitch Henderson, their conductor who founded the Pops, but died like a week or 2 before the concert.  Jim Pugh played the role of Tommy Dorsey.  I was an usher for it and got to sit about 15 ft behind the string bass players, so I was up close and personal to most of the orchestra compared to most of the other 1300 people there.  He played like none other I've ever heard before.  I could not believe my ears after he played.  He soared through the sky with his high notes, his low notes were crisp and clean, and he even incorporated some multiphonics that gave that section of the music and eerie quality, but sounded awesome.  I was astounded.  If I could ever sound half as good as that guy during my lifetime, I'd be happy with myself.  It was just that amazing.

And on a side note, I didnt get to talk to, but I got to stand pretty darn close to the son and daughter of Tommy Dorsey!!!!!!
Logged

Your heart is where the music is.  Let the world see your passion, and let them hear your every desire, all through that big shiney piece of brass that tells of your souls secrets.
Orestes
Bone Vivant

*
Offline Offline

Location: Walla Walla, WA
Joined: Apr 7, 2002
Posts: 2102
"Bone Vivant"


View Profile WWW
« Reply #21 on: Nov 28, 2005, 09:32PM »

A lesser known classical (and jazz sometimes) trombonist that I dig is Larry Zalkind the principal of the Utah Symphony. Beautiful, Big sound; everything impeccably executed.  I can recommend one of his CD's "Encore" on the Summit label that is excellent.
Logged

Galen McQuarrie

  "Some days you get up and put the horn to your chops and it sounds pretty good and you win.  Some days you try and nothing works and the horn wins. This goes on and on and then you die and the horn wins."  Dizzy Gillespie
Tenorbone78
*
Offline Offline

Location: Pittsburgh, PA
Joined: Oct 12, 2004
Posts: 60

View Profile
« Reply #22 on: Nov 28, 2005, 11:43PM »

I 2nd Galen.  I know Larry; he's a GREAT guy and wonderful player.  I just posted a list of some of my favorite musicians who play trombone under "Virtuosos?"  KM
Logged
jhale1966

*
Offline Offline

Location: My 'Practice Area of The Day' In Poplar Bluff, MO
Joined: Aug 1, 2005
Posts: 345

View Profile WWW
« Reply #23 on: Nov 30, 2005, 04:01AM »

Quote from: "Orestes"
A lesser known classical (and jazz sometimes) trombonist that I dig is Larry Zalkind the principal of the Utah Symphony. Beautiful, Big sound; everything impeccably executed.  I can recommend one of his CD's "Encore" on the Summit label that is excellent.

I'll 2nd this - I have the Encore! CD and listen to it at least 4x/week on the way to/from work. Good!
Logged

Jim Hale
Hale Recordings
Phone/Fax: 573-727-6511
You Must Ask Yourself - Do You Play Trombone For It's Glory... Or For Yours?
Nohbdy

*
Offline Offline

Location: Winter Haven, Florida
Joined: Jul 17, 2004
Posts: 322

View Profile WWW
« Reply #24 on: Nov 30, 2005, 01:35PM »

I really like Carsten Svanberg's sound. I got to hear him a few weeks ago, it was awesome!
Logged

Kumdo0770

*
Offline Offline

Location:
Joined: Jul 23, 2005
Posts: 59

View Profile
« Reply #25 on: Dec 11, 2005, 11:20AM »

How about uh...I dont know if I'm spelling this right...

Nitzan Haroz?? He's in..i think Manhattan School of Music right now?? or was it Mannes??
Logged
j55gray

*
Offline Offline

Location:
Joined: Nov 11, 2005
Posts: 35

View Profile
« Reply #26 on: Dec 11, 2005, 12:09PM »

Another ensemble you might be interested in checking out is Bones Apart, a female trombone quartet - they have a lovely sound.
Check them out at http://www.bonesapart.com
Logged

"Never look at the trombones...it only encourages them." - Richard Strauss
djdekok

*
Offline Offline

Location: Norristown PA
Joined: Sep 25, 2001
Posts: 4140
"Monsters Eat Whiny Children"


View Profile WWW
« Reply #27 on: Dec 11, 2005, 12:59PM »

Quote from: "Kumdo0770"
How about uh...I dont know if I'm spelling this right...

Nitzan Haroz?? He's in..i think Manhattan School of Music right now?? or was it Mannes??


 Horrors!

Philadelphia area OTJ'ers recoil in shock

he's with the Philadelphia Orchestra, and teaches at Curtis...
Logged

Daniel De Kok
Associate Principal, Southeastern Pennsylvania Symphony Orchestra
B.M. Michigan
M.M. Western Michigan
M.S.L.S. Clarion
Blue Hose Bone 311

*
Offline Offline

Location: South Carolina
Joined: Nov 7, 2005
Posts: 118

View Profile
« Reply #28 on: Dec 11, 2005, 04:00PM »

JOSEPH ALESSI!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! I cannot believe nobody has posted his name.
In my view he has the best tone quality of anyone I have heard thus far.
Logged

Christian
Schwob School of Music
Columbus State University
bassbonepeenut

*
Offline Offline

Location: NYC
Joined: Sep 19, 2002
Posts: 225

View Profile
« Reply #29 on: Dec 11, 2005, 07:39PM »

Actually Nitzan has been at Mannes and Manhattan School recently.  He has been rehearsing with Haim Avitsur and Dave Taylor.  I think they are getting ready to record an album of trombone trios.  My favorite trombone sounds are Charlie Vernon, Steve Norrell, Nitzan Haroz, Joe Alessi, Dick Shearer, Dave Taylor (especially his Sinatra and Absolute recordings).  The first time I heard all these guys play LIVE it was life changing--Pat
Logged

The bass trombone is a paintbrush from Heaven--Dave Taylor
Tenorbone

*
Offline Offline

Location: The Colony, TX
Joined: Aug 8, 2005
Posts: 312

View Profile
« Reply #30 on: Dec 12, 2005, 06:58PM »

john kitzman principle of the dallas symphony orchestra!
Logged

Don't argue about the difficulties. The difficulties will argue for themselves.
- Winston Churchill
Tenorbone

*
Offline Offline

Location: The Colony, TX
Joined: Aug 8, 2005
Posts: 312

View Profile
« Reply #31 on: Dec 12, 2005, 07:00PM »

Quote from: "Blue Hose Bone 311"
JOSEPH ALESSI!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! I cannot believe nobody has posted his name.
In my view he has the best tone quality of anyone I have heard thus far.

 

ummmm.... he said he already listens to him and is asking for different ones.
Logged

Don't argue about the difficulties. The difficulties will argue for themselves.
- Winston Churchill
underoath69

*
Offline Offline

Location: Nashville
Joined: Jun 1, 2005
Posts: 168

View Profile
« Reply #32 on: Dec 13, 2005, 01:31PM »

Quote from: "Tenorbone"
john kitzman principle of the dallas symphony orchestra!



i was just gonna say that, i personally think he has the best orchestral sound, but then again thats just my opinion
Logged

Shake and Bake
tbarh
*
Offline Offline

Location:
Joined: Mar 6, 2005
Posts: 598

View Profile
« Reply #33 on: Dec 13, 2005, 02:58PM »

I  had the chance to listen to Michel Bequet a couple of times during the eighties.In my opinion(!!);if tone quality alone matters; He`s number one with Joe Alessi number two with a slight distance down to number three (which I cant make up my mind who is).
As for bass; Charlie Vernon ,Doug Yeo and of course George Roberts(why isn`t he on everybodys list??)George Flynn and John Engelkes also deserves mentioning! Oh, and Wim Becu(sp?), bass sackbut!

tbarh
Logged
FCBB_Bone
*
Offline Offline

Location:
Joined: Nov 16, 2004
Posts: 47

View Profile
« Reply #34 on: Dec 18, 2005, 08:51AM »

Mark Lawrence
Michael Mulcahey
Peter Norton
Larry Zalkind
Tim Myers
Roger Oyster

Of course I like the "usual suspects"...but these are guys who I don't hear much talk about, but I really LOVE their sounds.
Logged
trombones O' mayhem

*
Offline Offline

Location: Saint Petersburg/Tampa, Florida
Joined: Dec 9, 2005
Posts: 737

View Profile WWW
« Reply #35 on: Jan 21, 2006, 08:13PM »

harold van schaik of the florida orchestra
Logged

"Think product, not methodology." -Arnold Jacobs
 B.M. in Music Education & Applied Music, and Performer's Certificate, Eastman School of Music, '13
jft

*
Offline Offline

Location: Cleveland
Joined: Aug 9, 2005
Posts: 279

View Profile
« Reply #36 on: Jan 26, 2006, 12:47PM »

IMO, any top notch orchestral player these days has good tone.  Theres no way someones winning a job with poor tone.
Logged
trombones O' mayhem

*
Offline Offline

Location: Saint Petersburg/Tampa, Florida
Joined: Dec 9, 2005
Posts: 737

View Profile WWW
« Reply #37 on: Jan 26, 2006, 01:11PM »

Quote from: "jft"
IMO, any top notch orchestral player these days has good tone.  Theres no way someones winning a job with poor tone.

this may be stupid, but what's IMO mean?!?!?!
Logged

"Think product, not methodology." -Arnold Jacobs
 B.M. in Music Education & Applied Music, and Performer's Certificate, Eastman School of Music, '13
Sinfonia98

*
Offline Offline

Location: Lafayette, LA
Joined: Mar 12, 2004
Posts: 7377
"Back Home!!!!"


View Profile
« Reply #38 on: Jan 26, 2006, 01:13PM »

In My Opinion
Logged

Beau

"If at first you don't succeed, you're obviously not Chuck Norris."
DaveAshley

*
Offline Offline

Location: Lexington, Kentucky - Usually at sea
Joined: Jun 14, 2005
Posts: 2536

View Profile
« Reply #39 on: Jan 26, 2006, 01:20PM »

Gary Valente has really good tone quality!!

Yeah!  And Roswell Rudd too!!!

What is "good" tone quality?  Pretty? Or is it something that speaks to you?

OK OK, so they're not classical players......

Blair Bollinger probably had the most beautiful bass bone sound I've ever heard live.  Mmm mmmm......
Logged

courtois
*
Offline Offline

Location: Germany
Joined: Jan 19, 2003
Posts: 173

View Profile
« Reply #40 on: Jan 28, 2006, 07:14PM »

tenor and alto trombone:

Michel Becquet , Braimir Slokar, Jorgen van de Rien, Joseph Alessi, Thomas Horch (former berlin philharmonic, now in Munich) , Alain Trudel,Christian Lindberg, Jacques Mauger (French soloist, former member of the Paris opera) ,Gilles Milière (professor at the Conservatoire de Paris), Danny Bonvin and Dankwart Schmidt (both Munich philharmonic), Olaf Ott and Christhard Gössling (both Berlin philharmonic), Jürgen Heinel (Berlin opera - Staatskapelle), Oliver Siefert (Broadcast symphnoy orchestra of Frankfurt and professor in Frankfurt), Stefan Geiger (Broadcast Symphony orchestra and professor in Hamburg), Hendricus Ries (Broadcast symphony orchestra of Cologne and former member of German Brass)), Enrique Crespo (former Broadcast symphony  of Stuttgart and German brass foundator), Georg Wiegel (Rotterdam philharmonic I think)

Bass and contrabass trombone:

Ben van Dijk, Volker Hensiek (Bamberg Symphony), Joachim Mittelacher, Siegfried Cieslik, Hermann Bäumer (all former member of the Berlin philharmonic I think), Uwe Füssel (Munich opera and German Brass), Stephan Poppe (Hamburg opera and former member of german Brass),
David Stewart (London Brass), Markus Blechner (Munich Broadcast Symphony),

I know several of them are not well known outside of their country, but I really appreciated the tone of all of them.
Logged
KevinHickey

*
Offline Offline

Location: Vancouver, BC
Joined: Sep 21, 2005
Posts: 241

View Profile WWW
« Reply #41 on: Jan 30, 2006, 08:12AM »

Quote from: "Ari"
I would like to add Alain Trudel

just what i was going to say Good!
also, i believe his sit has a few sample songs on it
Logged
healthytrombone

*
Offline Offline

Location: Montréal, Québec
Joined: Nov 28, 2004
Posts: 88

View Profile
« Reply #42 on: Jan 31, 2006, 03:23PM »

Quote from: "Tenorbone"
john kitzman principle of the dallas symphony orchestra!


so, i haven't heard it yet but my teacher says that his fave rendition of mahler 3 is by john kitzman.  

and i am shocked and appalled that Joe Alessi wasn't the first person mentioned let alone not until halfway through the second page.

~grant
Logged
Jeff Smith
*
Offline Offline

Location: New York City
Joined: Nov 3, 2005
Posts: 3564

View Profile
« Reply #43 on: Feb 01, 2006, 08:35AM »

Conrad Herwig has a nice smooth tone. He's not classical but he's good anyway.
Logged

(customized) Getzen 3062AF - custom Greg Black
(customized) Getzen 1062FD - Greg Black 1.5G
healthytrombone

*
Offline Offline

Location: Montréal, Québec
Joined: Nov 28, 2004
Posts: 88

View Profile
« Reply #44 on: Feb 01, 2006, 10:55AM »

Quote from: "healthytrombone"
Quote from: "Tenorbone"
john kitzman principle of the dallas symphony orchestra!


so, i haven't heard it yet but my teacher says that his fave rendition of mahler 3 is by john kitzman.  

and i am shocked and appalled that Joe Alessi wasn't the first person mentioned let alone not until halfway through the second page.

~grant


just kidding, i must have forgotten that Alessi was mentioned first.

~grant
Logged
BobCochran
« Reply #45 on: Mar 28, 2007, 01:45PM »

That Bob Cochran has a dang nice tone. :D

( I can say that since I don't play for a living and I don't have to worry about gettin' the I-saw-you-braggin'-on-da-forum-and-I'd-blacklist-you-if-I-could-you-egotistical-son-of-a-gun stink-eye from other pros in my area. )

But seriously, I sound really really nice, just ask me! And seriously handsome! And really cool and modest! ;-)

VERY bad taste in ties, though, I'm told. A few have been unkind enough to point out my overweight condition and duck feet...and my frequent sight-reading errors...and no jazz improv skills these days, way rusty...don't always play perfectly in tune...still make time/rhythm mistakes...kids point at me and laugh, dogs bark at me, cats hiss.....Don't know

But I sounds good, I sez!
Logged
BobCochran
« Reply #46 on: Mar 28, 2007, 03:45PM »

Oh yeah...

Ian McDougall!  No one plays prettier.  Some have played as pretty, like Urbie and a few rare others.  And it's not a sickly-sweet pretty, it's always tasteful, always warm, always examplary.  A hugely underrated player, at least on this forum.
Logged
MikeBassBone
You are what you is

*
Offline Offline

Location: Fort Carson 4ID Band
Joined: Dec 18, 2004
Posts: 527

View Profile WWW
« Reply #47 on: Mar 28, 2007, 04:15PM »

I second James Markey he has such a nice legato, and my bass trombone hero is Randy Hawes, I think I melted that CD from listening to it so many times.
Logged

4th Infantry Division Band
"Steadfast and Loyal"
Chris Cline
« Reply #48 on: Mar 28, 2007, 04:19PM »

OK, OK, I know you said classical players, but . . .

JJ Johnson.  Mr. Tone, for my money, in the jazz world and if memory serves influential for Mr. Alessi as well.  Which is probably why I like his tone for classical players best.

Totally subjective, but Alessi and Johnson create(d) my favorite tones!
Logged
BobCochran
« Reply #49 on: Mar 28, 2007, 05:02PM »

Oh, dat's right, first post did specify classical, oh well.....great tone is great tone.
Logged
njboneplayer622

*
Offline Offline

Location: New Jersey
Joined: Jan 6, 2006
Posts: 253

View Profile
« Reply #50 on: Mar 28, 2007, 05:33PM »

I am going to say James Markey for tenor, being in a practice room with him when he was my teacher a Montclair State was amazing. Also when he played the Creston at ETW last year, WOW! I couldn't believe the sounds coming out of his bell. Mark Lawrence as well, I have heard him live and it was amazing.

For Bass Trombone: My #1 pick is Blair Bollinger of Philly. What a sound! Then of course there is the rich and creamy sound of Douglas Yeo. Also, a very important person that has one of the most beautiful sounds I have heard is John Rojak. He also a extrememly nice down to earth person. He also a great teacher, I learned a ton from the one time I met with him. Along with these guys, the Bass player from Trombones de Costa Rica gets and awesome sound as well, I couln't believe what I heard when I saw them perform "Toccata & Fugue in D Minor". There are so many players with great tone, and the best part is they all have their own unique characteristics that make it their own.
Logged

Chris

Band Director,
Technology High School
Newark, New Jersey

Lead Trombonist, Hanover Wind Symphony

B.A. in Music Education
Concentration on Bass Trombone
Montclair State University
John J. Cali School of Music
zemry

*
*
Offline Offline

Location: Mansfield, Louisiana
Joined: May 31, 2001
Posts: 5581
"Steve Turre and myself in the French Quarter"


View Profile WWW
« Reply #51 on: Mar 28, 2007, 06:00PM »

What's the difference between a great classical tone and a great jazz tone? Is there a difference?
Logged

There won't come a time when you won't have to practice anymore.........J.J. Johnson

Richard Zemry Johnson, Jr.
Dean Hubbard

*
Offline Offline

Location: Oakland, CA, USA
Joined: Feb 2, 2003
Posts: 81

View Profile
« Reply #52 on: Mar 28, 2007, 06:03PM »

Here's my list.  (No order)

Tommy Dorsey
Art Sayers
Billy Rausch
Joe Howard
Gardell Simons
Bobby Byrne
Lloyd Elliot
Dick Nash
Murry McEarchern
Geo. Roberts
Urbie
Ralph Sauer
Gordon Pullis
Watrous
Bill Harris
Robert Marsteller


Logged

Dean Hubbard
Artist/Clinician for Getzen Trombones
Chris Cline
« Reply #53 on: Mar 28, 2007, 10:14PM »

What's the difference between a great classical tone and a great jazz tone? Is there a difference?

Good question, which, even though I raised the distinction, I now can't really clarify.  A great classical tone, to me, is a very broad one, perhaps rounder, almost french horn-like.  And, to my less-trained ear, there is a little more uniformity of tone among classical players, in the sense that they're typically striving for that larger, rounder sound.  And generally it seems to me is developed using a similar set of teaching criteria, with the result that the difference in tone between legit players is more nuanced and subtle (though no less distinct). 

A great jazz tone is, on the other hand, undefinable except by personal preference, because it's goal is the individual statement.  While to my ear, Alessi and Lindberg are very distinct in tone, they seem to be shooting at the same target. And I respect the nuanced differences in both.  Steve Turre and Bill Harris, on the other hand, seem to have completely different conceptions of the instrument.  Which is why I love one and really don't like the other. 

Or maybe it's like pornography.  You just know it when you hear it. 

Or maybe I'm just talking out of my a**.  Won't be the first time. 
Logged
Graham Martin
Purveyor of 'HOT' Jazz

*
Offline Offline

Location: Redland Bay, Queensland, AUSTRALIA
Joined: Nov 5, 2000
Posts: 11540
"Dixieland/Mainstream/Big Band"


View Profile
« Reply #54 on: Mar 29, 2007, 02:37AM »

For jazz, the more individual the tone, the better. Frinstance - Lawrence Brown and Vic Dickenson. Of course, it is really a combination of tone and phrasing that enables one to pick the great jazz trombonists after only a couple of bars of a blindfold test.
Logged

Grah

"May God bless and keep you always
May your wishes all come true
May you always do for others
And let others do for you
May you build a ladder to the stars
And climb on every rung
May you stay......forever young."
BobCochran
« Reply #55 on: Mar 29, 2007, 03:09PM »

Lots of people (though not a majority of trombonists, I would say) can produce a great tone on the trombone, not to trivialize it, because it isn't easy to always sound good when playing the difficult literature.

What this thread reminds me of is that the trombone is a magnificent instrument.  In the right hands, playing the right music, the sound alone causes goosebumps.  At least it does for me, which a large part of why I still play it.

There is also a vast spectrum of different sounds that can be made, from enormous and majestic, to lyrical and sweet, to whispering......many shades of sound, many valid ways to approach playing that can all sound good.
Logged
thayervalve

*
Offline Offline

Location: Pensacola, FL
Joined: Jan 20, 2004
Posts: 383

View Profile WWW
« Reply #56 on: Mar 31, 2007, 02:10PM »

Jaques Mauger!
Logged

Dan Dunford
2007 Florida All-State Principal Bass Trombone
---
Sound, to me, is the number one most important thing you can do. Get the greatest sound in the world and learn what to do with it. It has to be that way.
-George Roberts
swiftybone

*
Offline Offline

Location: Tampa, FL
Joined: Dec 26, 2006
Posts: 108

View Profile WWW
« Reply #57 on: Apr 11, 2007, 05:28PM »

Im surprised not to see more mention of Charles Vernon on here...
that sound is just like chocolate pudding (in a positive way), oh and that legato playing...
-Swifty
Logged

Dillon Swift
USF Class of 2012
BbG
« Reply #58 on: Apr 11, 2007, 05:33PM »

Im surprised not to see more mention of Charles Vernon on here...
that sound is just like chocolate pudding (in a positive way), oh and that legato playing...
-Swifty

Could you post a link to just a taste?
Logged
swiftybone

*
Offline Offline

Location: Tampa, FL
Joined: Dec 26, 2006
Posts: 108

View Profile WWW
« Reply #59 on: Apr 11, 2007, 05:38PM »

go to www.usftrombones.com and click on resources and then click Ballade - Ewazen
enjoy :-)
-Swifty
Logged

Dillon Swift
USF Class of 2012
Dan H.
He doesn't know how to put this, but he's kind of a big deal

*
Offline Offline

Location: Saratoga Springs / Potsdam, NY
Joined: Apr 16, 2003
Posts: 2600
"Conquer the devils with a little thing called love"


View Profile WWW
« Reply #60 on: Apr 11, 2007, 06:30PM »

That almost brought tears to my eyes at times. Wow!
Logged

- Daniel Havranek
BbG
« Reply #61 on: Apr 11, 2007, 08:29PM »

Obviously, Super Rich and Silky, Heavy Dark-Chocolate!!  The good stuff!!

Thanks, I needed that!!!

Joe
Logged
swiftybone

*
Offline Offline

Location: Tampa, FL
Joined: Dec 26, 2006
Posts: 108

View Profile WWW
« Reply #62 on: Apr 12, 2007, 01:22PM »

That almost brought tears to my eyes at times. Wow!

I know, its incredible what a beautiful sound can do to a listener emotionally....
Logged

Dillon Swift
USF Class of 2012
trombones O' mayhem

*
Offline Offline

Location: Saint Petersburg/Tampa, Florida
Joined: Dec 9, 2005
Posts: 737

View Profile WWW
« Reply #63 on: Apr 22, 2007, 07:40PM »

ralph sauer!!!!
Logged

"Think product, not methodology." -Arnold Jacobs
 B.M. in Music Education & Applied Music, and Performer's Certificate, Eastman School of Music, '13
Miss_Rochut

*
Offline Offline

Location: Tampa, FL
Joined: Dec 11, 2005
Posts: 92

View Profile
« Reply #64 on: May 03, 2007, 02:31PM »

TRUE THAT^^^^^
and I'll second brandon and say that Harold Van Schaik has a terrific sound. (I'm always thouroughly embarrassed when I'm playing my rochuts down and octave and he's playing them down TWO and sounding amazing!!!!... :/)
Logged

~Emily
gbone145

*
Offline Offline

Location: Bay Area, California
Joined: Apr 29, 2007
Posts: 15

View Profile
« Reply #65 on: May 03, 2007, 03:03PM »

Tim Boyer
Logged
Johnston93

*
Offline Offline

Location: Chicago, IL
Joined: Nov 24, 2013
Posts: 173

View Profile WWW
« Reply #66 on: Jan 14, 2016, 07:29PM »

I know it's been a while since the last post, but this is a great one to revive.

Norman Bolter
Richard Stout
Tim Higgins
Fabrice Millischer
Jeremy Wilson

(A lot of others that I enjoy listening to have already been named)
Logged
Lush slide

*
Offline Offline

Location: Victoria BC Canada
Joined: Oct 27, 2013
Posts: 114

View Profile
« Reply #67 on: Jan 19, 2016, 03:35AM »

Gordon Campbell-BBC Big Band,John Wilson Orchestra etc.
Logged
timmopussycat
*
Offline Offline

Location:
Joined: Dec 22, 2017
Posts: 3

View Profile
« Reply #68 on: Dec 23, 2017, 06:18PM »

Gordon Sweeney (former Principal Trombonist of Dallas and Toronto Symphonies). An astonishingly clear, ringing and bright sound that was and is unmistakable. And it could be so soft or so big. For example, one time, before I knew the piece, I once heard the TS do Sibelius 7 from a place where I couldn't see the trombones well. Chitchatting after the following week's lesson, I asked Gord why the conductor had given him a bow - his sound was so big in the solo I had thought I was hearing a section unison! 
Logged
ParLawGod
The Man Who Doesn't Need a Title
*
Offline Offline

Location: Wisconsin, United States
Joined: Feb 26, 2003
Posts: 3560

View Profile WWW
« Reply #69 on: Dec 23, 2017, 07:43PM »

Michel Becquet and Megumi Kanda are my two favorites.
Logged
baileyman
*
Offline Offline

Location: Danvers, MA
Joined: Jan 18, 2007
Posts: 2057

View Profile
« Reply #70 on: Dec 31, 2017, 04:22PM »

Typical "name a player" thread where in this case otherwise superb players are listed who nevertheless have atrocious tone quality.  What happens when everyone is listed. 
Logged
bassboneman

*
Offline Offline

Location: Lower Hudson Valley, NY
Joined: Oct 15, 2007
Posts: 1125

View Profile
« Reply #71 on: Dec 31, 2017, 05:13PM »

Randy Hawes of the Detroit Symphony

Hands down my Fav!!!
Logged
Pages: 1 2 3 4 [All]   Go Up
Print
Jump to: