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Author Topic: monette mothpieces  (Read 9022 times)
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philmonikertromboniker
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« on: Sep 15, 2003, 06:43AM »

what are your opinions? any one using them? any one good you know using them   ?
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brahmsnbach

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« Reply #1 on: Sep 15, 2003, 06:55AM »

I play on a Monette, and have for several year, and I must say that I love it. The tone is more open sounding, since the bore is basically a straight shot through...there is no taper as you get closer to the cup. However, this being said...it seems that a lot of trombonists are playing Greg Black mouthpieces now. I don't really know what they see in them, but if they like 'em...go for it. I think if you find someone who has a Monette, you should ask to try it out for a while. You should also try a bunch of other mouthpieces...that's the only way to know what's right for you. Don't go for what other people say is good...try them all and decide for yourself. After all...it is going to be sitting on your face every day.  
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slideorama

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« Reply #2 on: Sep 15, 2003, 07:03AM »

You can use the search function of this forum under the Mouthpieces category and find just about everyone's opinion on these.

I think they are very well made (actually beautiful), and they play very easily due to larger throat/backbore features. Dave Monette believes in a more holistic way of playing, which may or may not work with your own playing. Of course, his philosophy should not dictate your playing style, or your choice of his mouthpiece.

I think Matt Guilford (Bass trombone, National Symhpony Orchestra) plays them, and he is a great player. Some other great players are Dave Taylor (NYC Bass trombonist), Dave Tall (Bass Trombone, New Mexico Symphony), Jim Pugh (NYC jazz trombonist), and Wycliffe Gordon (jazz trobmonist).Of course, there are trumpet players that swear by them, along with Monette's $20,000 trumpets (almost literally made of gold).

The orchestral trombone models only come in a very heavyweight version. This may or may not be for you, really depending on the ensembles you play with and the halls or venues you play in, and your current equipment. These pieces project a nice sound, very well, but only in acoustically satisfying environments (big rooms, big concert halls). I personally also think you need to have a set of well developed chops to play these slightly larger pieces. And a well developed wallet - they range in price from $225 - 350 or so.

I think everyone here comes to agree that the price does not equal the percentage increase in your playing to make it worth the purchase. But, as they say here, your mileage may vary. Now, if Monette only made a solid gold bass trombone....  
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Michael Lawson
Dallas/Ft.Worth, TX
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« Reply #3 on: Sep 15, 2003, 07:03AM »

I play a TS-11 Prana it is fabulous and it suits ME, this is my oppinion and is based on my experience.
Other famous dudes are Jim Pugh, Wycliffe Gordon.
I don't know about the classical models though.
Downside is that they cost a lot, but considering what other instrument players have to fork out for their equipment they are cheap by comparison, and hey if they make you sound good and you can feel the benefits then why not.
Best thing is to ignore everyone elses oppinion (including mine) and try for yourself.
One word of warning though.......Give yourself at least 2 months to learn how to play it PROPERLY!!!!    
 
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« Reply #4 on: Sep 15, 2003, 07:49AM »

i agree.  what works for person a might not work for person b, so try out as much as you can.  get your hands on some different brands and sizes, and find what you like the most.  i'm currently trying to decide on either a doug yeo or a monette, and i really can't make up my mind.  

the way i look at it, the mouthpiece is the REAL instrument.  this is the equipment through which your lips create music/sounds.  the horn itself is just an amplifier.  and no matter what kind of amplifier you have, if you're not getting the most out of your instrument then your amplifier isn't going to do you much good.  so i say find the mouthpiece that's best for you, keeping in mind the tone you're going for and the types of gigs you play.
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« Reply #5 on: Sep 15, 2003, 08:39AM »

im against younger players who have rich parents that go out and get them one.....i know a couple kids like that...if youre younger i would say wait and develope chops before you consider one of these...they have them speacially made for you based on measurements of parts of your lips and whatnot...i dont know too much about them since i dont own one...but i dont recommend buying them from anyone except the manufacturer since theyre all different for theyre own reason...those 20k trumpets though....when will mr. monette develope a monette trombone...only for the rich...but man i would love to spend 5 minutes with one...
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trombeanbloke
« Reply #6 on: Sep 15, 2003, 09:04AM »

quote:
Originally posted by paul hanson1:
when will mr. monette develope a monette trombone...only for the rich...but man i would love to spend 5 minutes with one...

It's coming..........But don't hold your breath.......  
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john sandhagen
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« Reply #7 on: Sep 15, 2003, 11:07AM »

considering the weight of his trumpets you'll need a bodybuilder to hold it and a small boy to run the slide around...
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John Sandhagen,
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trombeanbloke
« Reply #8 on: Sep 15, 2003, 11:32AM »

You see how folk make fun of things before they have even seen or tried them.......    
Man the trumpets don't weigh that much!
And he builds lightweight models.
Maybe it was just an attempt at humour!!!!
Do not cuss things that you have no clue about.....    
It wasn't that long ago since folk on this forum were slagging off Rath trombones, now everyone wants one!!!
   
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Silversonic88

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« Reply #9 on: Sep 15, 2003, 12:03PM »

quote:
Originally posted by trombeanbloke:
 
quote:
Originally posted by paul hanson1:
when will mr. monette develope a monette trombone...only for the rich...but man i would love to spend 5 minutes with one...

It's coming..........But don't hold your breath.......    
Didnt he make a few trombones for the boston symphony section a while back?
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Alan James

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trombeanbloke
« Reply #10 on: Sep 15, 2003, 12:05PM »

I was referring to a "jazz" version actually.
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« Reply #11 on: Sep 15, 2003, 12:17PM »

A friend of mine is selling his Monette TT-5L as he has decided to play jazz exclusivly. If anyone is interested I can get you a pretty good deal on a nearly brand new Monette.

BTW-Before I get flamed, I know this is not the place to sell stuff, I just wanted to get the info out there.
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Orestes
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« Reply #12 on: Sep 15, 2003, 12:39PM »

quote:
Originally posted by trombeanbloke:
Man the trumpets don't weigh that much!

I have heard 8 lbs. I have also heard of anecdotal stories of wrist and shoulder difficulties from people hefting/playing them.
quote:

Maybe it was just an attempt at humour!!!!



I think this was the case. Seriously, though, If he made them at his facility in Portland, OR. I would probably drop over to try one out. I probably wouldn't pay a 5 figure ammount for one, however.
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Galen McQuarrie

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« Reply #13 on: Sep 15, 2003, 03:09PM »

would be nice....built in mouthpiece...i admire wynton marsalis' trumpet for that feature...kinda like buyin a ferrari though..i mean imagine how pissed you would get if someone dinged it...the smallest ding might throw off the whole sound of the horn depending where it hits..i wouldnt risk it..im happy with my 2b...
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Bob Blossom
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« Reply #14 on: Sep 15, 2003, 03:51PM »

I tried a Monet trombone once that he made for a friend of his. It was pretty good. As far as I know, he has only made straight horns and of the folks who had them, I don't know of anybody who still plays on it. This knowledge is from awhile ago, though. Before Edwards, Shires, etc...

I tried one of his large bore tenor mouthpieces and didn't like it. Who knows, maybe if I'd had two months to get used to it...
Also, ths idea of a custom made mouthpiece to ones lip measurements is intrigiong...
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john sandhagen
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« Reply #15 on: Sep 16, 2003, 06:43AM »

Partial truth, partial humor.  The trumpets (even the lightweight) weigh more than a Bach.  What seems to make the Monette focus and project are the weight of the brass in the front of the horn.  Trombones can use a heavier leadpipe and mouthpeice, but the heavier slide and crook...

Maybe some efficientcies could be gained through using a "Monette" style crook or improved bell design. Or maybe it would fundamentally change the character of the trombone even more.

And yes, I'd try one.
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John Sandhagen,
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dj kennedy

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« Reply #16 on: Sep 16, 2003, 06:59AM »

hook up  a  heavy weight besson 525  slide to
 a  voca bell  
 add  some  20ga  deco //streamlining  
 -----
or  a staggerwing like the  old buescher  400
  --
 but would  delf  play  it ???????
-------
the guys  in  maynards  band were using
 mona  freebies  -
 ------maybe  a  great  big
 like 4  inch  high  M    for a
 counterweight
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Vitalemob

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« Reply #17 on: Sep 30, 2003, 03:11AM »

Copied Straight from Monette site--------

We offer eight different base models and weights of Bb trumpets to suit the widest possible range of musical situations. From our one-and-a-half pound 2000LT to our seven-pound, decorated RAJA SAMADHI

Seven pounds...nice....
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