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dmguion
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« on: Mar 14, 2006, 06:01AM »

The OTJ article library will soon have a paper presented at a 1980-something International Trombone Workshop by the late Bob Lindsay. I got two different versions of the paper from him, neither one with adequate footnotes. I have chased everything down but the last one. Even the archives of the NYPO can't identify the article in question. Can any of you?

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Let me end by quoting from an article written by Gordon Pulis in 1849 while he was playing with the New York Philharmonic in one of the great trombone sections of all time. His main point was the importance of dance band players in the development of contemporary technique. He called attention to Gardell Simon as "probably the first person to evolve and teach the theory and technique of the tongue legato." Pulis describes this as the "trombonist's solution to the legato style--a difficulty due to the limitations inherent in a slide instrument."

But Pulis then says: "...great as the advances of Simon and others were, the young dance band players have developed this even further, so that today one can tune in the radio and hear almost any dance trombonist singing on his instrument that would undoubtedly delight Simon were he living today."

================

I hope that rings a bell with someone. I need the citation for Lindsay's article, and I would dearly love to get a hold of the whole thing for my own curiosity.
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David M. Guion
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dmguion
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« Reply #1 on: Mar 14, 2006, 06:16PM »

Quote from: "dmguion"

Let me end by quoting from an article written by Gordon Pulis in 1849


OOPS! That's supposed to be 1948. Can't type. Can't play piano, either. Now, at least, y'all can look in the right century!
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David M. Guion
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« Reply #2 on: Mar 14, 2006, 06:58PM »

Quote from: "dmguion"
The OTJ article library will soon have a paper presented at a 1980-something International Trombone Workshop by the late Bob Lindsay. I got two different versions of the paper from him, neither one with adequate footnotes. I have chased everything down but the last one. Even the archives of the NYPO can't identify the article in question. Can any of you?

==================
Let me end by quoting from an article written by Gordon Pulis in 1849 while he was playing with the New York Philharmonic in one of the great trombone sections of all time. His main point was the importance of dance band players in the development of contemporary technique. He called attention to Gardell Simon as "probably the first person to evolve and teach the theory and technique of the tongue legato." Pulis describes this as the "trombonist's solution to the legato style--a difficulty due to the limitations inherent in a slide instrument."

But Pulis then says: "...great as the advances of Simon and others were, the young dance band players have developed this even further, so that today one can tune in the radio and hear almost any dance trombonist singing on his instrument that would undoubtedly delight Simon were he living today."

================

I hope that rings a bell with someone. I need the citation for Lindsay's article, and I would dearly love to get a hold of the whole thing for my own curiosity.

Dunno the article...but Mr. Pulis was right on the money.

Tommy Dorsey.

Need I say more?

S.
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« Reply #3 on: Apr 06, 2006, 05:35AM »

David,

This is an interesting quote by Pulis, and I do believe Pulis studied with Simons when he was at Curtis.

But here is something interesting that has been coming to light.

It seems there was somewhat of a split when it came to teachers at that time, and I wonder again if this didn’t have something to do with the “band vs orchestra” thinking. (I have spoken on this in other treads.)

Simons was known to have started the “modern” trombone school, but what does this mean?  Could it mean the modern orchestra trombone school?

I do know that many orchestral players went to Simons to study, as he was teaching at Curtis when he was with Philly.

But here is the interesting thing:  It looks like many of the Jazz players were looking to study with Arthur Pryor.  Dickie Wells speaks of it. Also, I just received a copy of a thesis by Wendy Schultz, entitled: “Arthur Pryor Exercises: Memories and Manuscripts From Jack Bigelow, A Former Pryor Student.”

Who was Jack Bigelow?  

A Jazz trombonist.

Here is an interesting quote from the work:

“A typical lesson with Pryor consisted of “playing to make sure he was doing it right, and using good breathing habits”

Also:

“Bigelow states that he had about ten or twelve lessons with Pryor, saying:  It wasn’t a weekly thing or anything. I’d call when I’d have a problem or if I wanted some help on something I found difficult.  Because when I when there, I didn’t have the facility with the slide in the smooth movements.  I would work on playing smooth.  I wanted to be more lyrical, like Jack Jenny, and he (Pryor) helped me greatly on that. “

Also again:

“He (Pryor) was great on legato.  He was great otherwise too! Oh yes, he played in my lessons.”

And again:

“Pryor’s main focus in lessons with Bigelow was working to smooth his legato style and work for speed and accuracy of slide motion.” (An interesting note: Al Lube had a different way of using the slide, and I asked him who taught him that?  He stated that it was his teacher, Carroll Martin.  Who did Carroll Martin study with?  Arthur Pryor!)

Again, could there have been a split in the trombone world, sending certain players to certain teachers?

Pryor’s playing style lent itself to the Jazz artist, more than to the orchestral player of the time.
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« Reply #4 on: Apr 06, 2006, 07:19AM »

I am fairly certain that  the article with  these quotes came from the 'Instrumentalist' magazine, a former publication for the music educator community. It certainly sounds familiar, and if indeed that is true he also talked of the dance band players' facility in the high range, making things such as the Brahms #1 chorale less of a threat to the section. Pulis was a Remington student at Eastman. This was discussed several months ago here. He was certainly a monster player and one of the most respected trombone players of his century.
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« Reply #5 on: Apr 06, 2006, 11:48AM »

Quote from: "jbayes"
I am fairly certain that  the article with  these quotes came from the 'Instrumentalist' magazine, a former publication for the music educator community. It certainly sounds familiar, and if indeed that is true he also talked of the dance band players' facility in the high range, making things such as the Brahms #1 chorale less of a threat to the section. Pulis was a Remington student at Eastman. This was discussed several months ago here. He was certainly a monster player and one of the most respected trombone players of his century.


Yes, but Pulis went to Curtis, I believe, after he was at Eastman.

And I believe when he was there he studied with Simons, if I remember right.
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dmguion
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« Reply #6 on: Apr 10, 2006, 08:15AM »

Quote from: "jbayes"
I am fairly certain that  the article with  these quotes came from the 'Instrumentalist' magazine, a former publication for the music educator community.


Thank you very much for this suggestion. I just looked back at the Instrumentalist for 1948. I found an interesting article by Jaroslav Cimera, but even looking through our microfilm Frown for 1946-1949, found no article by Pulis.

Part of the problem is that the Music Index did not start until  1949. Maybe I should look in that first issue to see what other likely suspects existed at that time.

If there are any graduate students lurking to get research ideas, some kind of index of brass-related magazine and journal articles from 1900 to 1950 might be a good project. Reader's Guide does not cover music-related magazines, and when RILM/RIPM get around to covering that time period, probably neither one of them will index anything but the more scholarly materials.

Meanwhile, any other suggestions would be very welcome.
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David M. Guion
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« Reply #7 on: Apr 29, 2009, 08:53AM »

I just came across the citation for this article in a Master's thesis from 1950.  I searched all over trying to find the magazine and finally came up with the article from Ohio State's library.  Any of you that would be interested in a pdf of the article are welcome to send a message with you email and I will forward it to you.

The citation is as follows:

Pulis, Gordon M.  "On Trombone Technique"  Symphony Magazine
     New York:  Symphony, December, 1948.

This is not the "Newsletter - of the American Symphony Orchestra League" which has been since changed to Symphony Magazine, but a different publication from the same era (actually started publication in 1948).

Thanks to great librarians at the Cincinnati Conservatory (Paul Cauthen) and Ohio State University (Sean Ferguson) that helped me sort through this info!


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« Reply #8 on: Apr 29, 2009, 05:39PM »

Eric,

This article is still under copyright, and as such, you need the permission of the author or publisher to make copies.
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« Reply #9 on: Sep 12, 2016, 06:03PM »

I think Mr Pulis more than likely studied with either Charles Gerjatd or Mr. Gussikkof  at Curtis.
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« Reply #10 on: Sep 12, 2016, 06:12PM »

I think Mr Pulis more than likely studied with either Charles Gerhard pr Mr Gussikof given the years he attended Curtis
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« Reply #11 on: Sep 14, 2016, 05:47AM »

This article is still under copyright, and as such, you need the permission of the author or publisher to make copies.

Given the purpose and character (non-profit, educational), nature of the work (published), and potential market effect (no major impact, licensing/permission probably unavailable) of the copies, it is more than likely that the copies would qualify as fair use.
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