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Author Topic: Bach 3G mouthpiece  (Read 14850 times)
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Steve McGovern
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« on: Apr 08, 2006, 05:30PM »

This mouthpiece always struck me as oddball.  Too large for tenor, too small for bass.  Does anyone know why Vincent designed it (or if it came after he retired)?  Did he just want a continuum of sizes, and let the trombonists decide?  Was that a proper size for bass trombone at one point?  Maybe so, if the 3B-F could qualify as a bass.
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MikeMiller
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« Reply #1 on: Apr 08, 2006, 05:40PM »

Who say's it's too large for tenor? I have played a Shilke 53, which is about the same size, on tenor for 20 years. Maybe I just have fat lips.
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« Reply #2 on: Apr 08, 2006, 06:59PM »

I know several people who play tenor but have basses and use them occaisionally, who use the 3G as it's not a huge change from their normal mouthpieces.

My high school also had a 3G for their bass trombone when I was there (dunno about now), a good stepping stone to learning it I guess when you're used to 12C or 6 1/2AL mouthpieces.
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JohnL
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« Reply #3 on: Apr 08, 2006, 09:28PM »

The Bach 50B3L that the music department at Cal Poly SLO bought back in the early 80's was delivered with a Bach 3G; I never saw anyone use it.
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« Reply #4 on: Apr 09, 2006, 08:04AM »

Jay Friedman(Freidman?) use a 3G or 3G sized mouthpiece.  But, he has very strong chops and plays in the CSO, so he needs to be pretty loud.

Maybe 3G is like the megamonster-largest-bass trombone- mouthpiece-in-the-world of tenors? Horrors!
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« Reply #5 on: Apr 09, 2006, 07:57PM »

I have 3 3G mouthpieces: the first is a Mt. Vernon, which I bought in a pawn shop for $10; the 2nd is a Greg Black, which I paid a friend for by buying him lunch; and the 3rd is a custom Monette that I spent a lot of money on (I actually have 2 of these, though the Army owns one of them). Big is relative when it comes to mouthpieces, the 3G just is a good fit for my face and I make a living playing high. I'm sure that the 3G was originally categorized as a bass mouthpiece, as I think anything from 5 down used to be considered a bass mouthpiece, ah how times have changed. There's a perfect mouthpiece for every mouth have fun hunting, I've found mine, for the time being.
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« Reply #6 on: Apr 09, 2006, 09:30PM »

I used to play a Bach 3G on my King 5B (9" bell/0.547" bore).  I found it was a good size to exploit the low register, but still gave me a good, clear high register.

But then I discovered Griego mouthpieces, and now I play a Greigo Deco 3.5.  But it is still nearly the same size as the Bach 3G.
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Frank B
« Reply #7 on: Apr 09, 2006, 09:37PM »

Eh, I know a couple of guys who just play on big rims. It's much more comfortable for them. Do whatever works.
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Steve Dillon
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« Reply #8 on: Apr 10, 2006, 03:33AM »

Quote from: "Steve McGovern"
This mouthpiece always struck me as oddball.  Too large for tenor, too small for bass.  Does anyone know why Vincent designed it (or if it came after he retired)?  Did he just want a continuum of sizes, and let the trombonists decide?  Was that a proper size for bass trombone at one point?  Maybe so, if the 3B-F could qualify as a bass.


From a Bach Mouthpiece catalog of 1954:

3G

Same cup diameter and rim as the No. 3 tenor trombone mouthpiece, but with a deep bass trombone cup.  Full, vibrant bass trombone tone of rich, dark timbre.  Ideal for 3rd trombonist in symphonic band or symphony orchestra.  Facilitates pedal tones.
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« Reply #9 on: Apr 21, 2006, 11:06AM »

3G is fine for tenor. It really lets you open up if you have the support. On big bore horns I usually play a 4G, but I've played 3Gs before and I could see how folks in better shape than I am could work them easily.
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Jeff Smith
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« Reply #10 on: Sep 07, 2006, 11:24AM »

Very rich and dark tone.

I had a Curry 3M for a while, and it had a nice tone. I just didn't like the mouthpiece overall.

Some day I'd like to pick up a Bach 3G for cheap and play around with it.
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Frank Gulino

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« Reply #11 on: Sep 07, 2006, 12:03PM »

I played a few orchestral gigs with a guy who played a 3G Megatone on a Bach 42.  

sounded pretty round and full, and he had up to a high D with consistency, something that seems a little unlikely for a huge mouthpiece on a .547 horn.

it always comes back to one indesputable fact:  different things work for different people.  you shouldnt use equipment just because someone else does, nor should you rule something out because you dont think it'll work for you.

the 3G might be a freak mouthpiece, but it works for people out there as this thread has shown us.  gotta be open to things, i guess.
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Frank Gulino
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« Reply #12 on: Sep 07, 2006, 01:39PM »

why do you want just to pick one and play around? what about the quality of your posts???? just to say i would like to have this and that and i will buy this or that is not beneficial for many topics posted and for mayne questions asked! Clever
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Jeff Smith
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« Reply #13 on: Sep 07, 2006, 01:49PM »

I would like to give one a real try.

It has nothing to do with the quality of my posts.

It's just something I'd like to try out.

I'll try anything once.
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« Reply #14 on: Sep 07, 2006, 02:46PM »

Quote from: "Steve Dillon"
Quote from: "Steve McGovern"
This mouthpiece always struck me as oddball.  Too large for tenor, too small for bass.  Does anyone know why Vincent designed it (or if it came after he retired)?  Did he just want a continuum of sizes, and let the trombonists decide?  Was that a proper size for bass trombone at one point?  Maybe so, if the 3B-F could qualify as a bass.


From a Bach Mouthpiece catalog of 1954:

3G

Same cup diameter and rim as the No. 3 tenor trombone mouthpiece, but with a deep bass trombone cup.  Full, vibrant bass trombone tone of rich, dark timbre.  Ideal for 3rd trombonist in symphonic band or symphony orchestra.  Facilitates pedal tones.

That's how I use mine: if I need to do a third/bass part on my .547.  I don't currently have the chops to use that as my sole mpc for that horn, but it's a nice option to have in the bag.
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« Reply #15 on: Sep 08, 2006, 05:01AM »

Think euphonium. The kind of euphonium playing that makes it sound like a slide-'cello. Use a 3G on euph.

I use the Rath L4 ( 3G size) on a Conn bass bone to play second bone in a brass quartet. The Rath is way way better. Better flexibility and loads more support in the pedal register......no backing up with it, it lets you put as much air through the horn as you want to. Unlike a "real" Bach 3G.

I had taken a real 3G and severely butchered it by opening up the backbore and slightly opening the throat......not much improvement. The Rath is even more open than the modified 3G I made, and smaller yet, so it plays like a tenor in the upper register.
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« Reply #16 on: Sep 08, 2006, 07:15AM »

if  you  are used  to  flipping  mpcs  in and  out  
 in the middle of  rehearsal   or concerts  
  certain  pieces of music    are  more interesting
with  certain  mpcs  
  dynamics   //  range  //fast  //slow  
==========
oh  its  a  march  //////most   of this piece  is  high   or  low
----------------
5gb    thats  another  one  !!!!!!!!!
------------
if  the  mpc  fits   it  a  hit  !!!!!!
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john jenkins

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« Reply #17 on: Sep 08, 2006, 08:58AM »

Personally, I can't use anything smaller than a 3G rim and feel/play comfortably. I have full lips; my upper lip is just as wide as my bottom lip. In addition, I have a slight overbite. I NEED that extra room in my rim in order for my lips to buzz properly and consistently. I has the rim hacked off of a modified Bach Corp 3G that I really liked and has XT threads put on it and also had it goldplated. I use this same rim on my large bore and small bore horn, because it works and it makes doubling a lot easier. Different strokes for different folks, man. The 3G might be useless to you, but for me, and for people with similar maxillofacial anatomy, this mouthpiece is a necessity.

~ John
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tbone jason
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« Reply #18 on: Sep 08, 2006, 09:24AM »

I'm in the same boat as John.  I use a DE 104 rim(3G size) for tenor and alto playing.  Need the room for the my large lips, anything smaller and my bottom lip has no room to buzz.
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Dave Tatro
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« Reply #19 on: Sep 08, 2006, 09:29AM »

Ditto the two guys above. I need at least a 3g sized piece to be comfortable and sound good throughout my range.
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