Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length

 
Advanced search

1089097 Posts in 72000 Topics- by 19326 Members - Latest Member: analyssalovesmusic4
Jump to:  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
Print
Author Topic: I joined an orchestra!  (Read 2125 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
Fuzzy
The most

*
Offline Offline

Location: Adelaide, Australia, fromerly of the Northern Mountains of Lebanon, last seen in Beirut
Joined: Aug 4, 2005
Posts: 1162

View Profile
« on: Apr 11, 2006, 01:54PM »

Being the random spontaneous person i am, I woke up on Sunday and decided to join and orchestra, I asked mum, she was fine with it, so I rang got invited to auditionm, and there I was playing through a Bach Cello suite, and showing off my shiny bass trombone.

Funny thing is, full horn section, full everything, oboe, but only 1 trumpet!

Im doing some recruiting at school.

Well what can I say, I loved it, the troms wer insane, very precise musicians, extremely intellegent and funny people.

The orchestra rehearse better with a bass bone, alot of the pice had important bass trombone lines, wich cued everyone in.

It was a great experience, the power and oprchestra can put out is amazing, a tingle down your spine.
Logged

Firas el Achkar.

The size of a bass trombone has an inverse relationship with the size of the owner's penis.

Say NO to slide tubas!
BFW
Pun Gent

*
*
Offline Offline

Location: Alabamor
Joined: Aug 24, 2002
Posts: 21975
"Paronomasiacs Homonymous"


View Profile
« Reply #1 on: Apr 11, 2006, 02:14PM »

Good!  Enjoy!  :)
Logged

Brian

Our supreme responsibility is the moral obligation to be intelligent. -- Oliver L. Reiser
Derek Ream
hi
« Reply #2 on: Apr 11, 2006, 02:16PM »

What is the name of it, and what are the season highlights?
Logged
cotboneman

*
Offline Offline

Location: Tucson, AZ
Joined: Aug 13, 2005
Posts: 269

View Profile WWW
« Reply #3 on: Apr 11, 2006, 05:47PM »

Fantastic!  Do enjoy your new gig and give us some highlights of your season as it progresses.  Best of luck.
Logged
Fuzzy
The most

*
Offline Offline

Location: Adelaide, Australia, fromerly of the Northern Mountains of Lebanon, last seen in Beirut
Joined: Aug 4, 2005
Posts: 1162

View Profile
« Reply #4 on: Apr 11, 2006, 10:42PM »

Quote from: "TexasBassBone"
What is the name of it, and what are the season highlights?


Im not sure, this all happened in one day. Ill find out.
Logged

Firas el Achkar.

The size of a bass trombone has an inverse relationship with the size of the owner's penis.

Say NO to slide tubas!
Alex
*
Offline Offline

Location: UK
Joined: Oct 20, 2004
Posts: 1278

View Profile
« Reply #5 on: Apr 12, 2006, 10:16AM »

Good for you Firas,

Playing bass bone in an orchestra can be very rewarding. I don't do as much as I'd like.
Just a couple of things to be aware of though.
Concentrate and count.
It's not uncommon to sit through a rehearsal and go 20mins without blowing a note. Then just when you're about to get to your entry, the conductor stops and goes back over some tricky 4th viola part !!!!!
You'll soon find out that the bass bone is like a little section on it's own sometimes. Often playing while the tenors are resting, hence why I say concentrate and count.

Hope you have some great fun.
Logged
Stewbones43

*
Offline Offline

Location: Somerset U.K.
Joined: Mar 15, 2005
Posts: 2692

View Profile
« Reply #6 on: Apr 12, 2006, 11:08AM »

Good on you, Firas,

Just a couple of bits of information which you might find useful;

When you sit at the back of the orchestra you will have in front of you some very strange, turtle like creatures whose heads disappear into their bodies every time the trombone section starts to play. These are called VIOLA PLAYERS. In many amateur orchestras they are either very old or even dead (but no-one told them)

Over to your right and in front there will be a player who constantly turns and glares at you at any dynamic above mezzopiano. This player is probably female (whatever she looks like) and is a FLAUTIST. You can also identify them because they will practise the hard bit they have just played but which you obscured with your noisy trombone thing, whenever the conductor stops to see if all the violins are still in tune.

To your left there will be a group of players who will regularly ask if the trombones have the same dynamic as they have got at bar 368. These are the 'CELLOS and this is their way of getting at you because you, on your own, can make more noise than they can-all 12 of them.

The rest of the orchestra, not counting the brass and percussion, are OK to talk to- but they won't..........

The horns can't decide whether to talk to you or not. This is because, if you have been playing some classical/early romantic period music such as Beethoven, Schubert etc., then they think that they belong to the woodwind section. If however you have been belting out Tchaikovsky then the horns are with you.

The trumpets don't mind talking to you because they know that they can do it faster and higher than you can and the tuba player is too busy opening a can of something alcoholic to be bothered to talk to anybody.

The percussion player is usually too busy setting up or packing away so you've got 2 other trombone players to talk to.

Being part of an orchestra is a wonderful, social thing where you get chance to meet some fabulous and fascinating people and you will make friends who you will often keep for a very long time.

You will have some great evenings rehearsing and some great times playing in concerts.

ENJOY

Stewbones
Logged

Trombone means big trumpet-does that mean it is louder?
Sakari

*
Offline Offline

Location: Lahti, Finland
Joined: Dec 11, 2004
Posts: 24

View Profile
« Reply #7 on: Apr 16, 2006, 01:31PM »

This reminds me of the time when I had played the trombone for a few years and joined an amateur wind band.  Way cool Most of the musicians were old farts (or that's what I thought back then), some of them old enough to be my grandfather! It must have felt a bit weird at first, for a young guy like me (I think I was about 12 years old at the time). Luckily I now have the opportunity to play with a bunch of great people who don't make me feel out of place.  Grin Sitting in the back is great too, as I can see the whole orchestra (well, most of it anyway) without having to turn my head (unless I fall asleep during a ppp section while counting rests. Evil  )
Logged

Some have a way with words, some not have way. I are one of them.
Derek Ream
hi
« Reply #8 on: Apr 16, 2006, 03:23PM »

Quote from: "Stewbones43"
Good on you, Firas,

Just a couple of bits of information which you might find useful;

When you sit at the back of the orchestra you will have in front of you some very strange, turtle like creatures whose heads disappear into their bodies every time the trombone section starts to play. These are called VIOLA PLAYERS. In many amateur orchestras they are either very old or even dead (but no-one told them)

Over to your right and in front there will be a player who constantly turns and glares at you at any dynamic above mezzopiano. This player is probably female (whatever she looks like) and is a FLAUTIST. You can also identify them because they will practise the hard bit they have just played but which you obscured with your noisy trombone thing, whenever the conductor stops to see if all the violins are still in tune.

To your left there will be a group of players who will regularly ask if the trombones have the same dynamic as they have got at bar 368. These are the 'CELLOS and this is their way of getting at you because you, on your own, can make more noise than they can-all 12 of them.

The rest of the orchestra, not counting the brass and percussion, are OK to talk to- but they won't..........

The horns can't decide whether to talk to you or not. This is because, if you have been playing some classical/early romantic period music such as Beethoven, Schubert etc., then they think that they belong to the woodwind section. If however you have been belting out Tchaikovsky then the horns are with you.

The trumpets don't mind talking to you because they know that they can do it faster and higher than you can and the tuba player is too busy opening a can of something alcoholic to be bothered to talk to anybody.

The percussion player is usually too busy setting up or packing away so you've got 2 other trombone players to talk to.

Being part of an orchestra is a wonderful, social thing where you get chance to meet some fabulous and fascinating people and you will make friends who you will often keep for a very long time.

You will have some great evenings rehearsing and some great times playing in concerts.

ENJOY

Stewbones


How did you know my routine????.......wow.....lol Grin  Grin
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
Print
Jump to: