Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length

 
Advanced search

1088747 Posts in 71958 Topics- by 19317 Members - Latest Member: Whitewolf07
Jump to:  
Pages: 1 [2]  All   Go Down
Print
Author Topic: What is the point of music?  (Read 5545 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
Frank B
« Reply #20 on: Apr 17, 2006, 12:18PM »

Quote from: "BFW"
Or perhaps what is it about music that makes people want to create it or play it or have others create it or play it?


Yup.
Logged
Wishbone
*
Offline Offline

Location:
Joined: Mar 29, 2004
Posts: 19

View Profile
« Reply #21 on: Apr 22, 2006, 05:10PM »

I think it's far deeper than just enjoyment - although if we didn't enjoy it, it wouldn't survive.  

Every baby experiences the regularity of its mother's heartbeat in the womb. Rhythm.  To a baby, the world's a frightening place, full o strange sounds (amongst other things). The mother's singing is calming and (usually) overcomes the strident crying. Good sounds, not-so-good sounds. So music gets associated with emotion. And communicating that emotion. At school, there's singing in groups or class - it's a communal activity.  Songs are a way of learning - not just the sound but also the content - think how many songs were designed to help people remember.

And so it goes on through life.  It's always the same elements - emotion, communication, togetherness, learning.  If you haven't listened to any of the great operas, try Boheme, Tosca or the like - in Italian.  Listen toone of the great arias - without following the text or a translation. Just listen - I can still get chocked up hering "Your tiny hand is frozen", even though I can't follow the Italian. The music says so much more than the words.
Logged
Precious
Omar the Tent Maker

*
Offline Offline

Location: Behind a sewing machine
Joined: Mar 29, 2004
Posts: 3296

View Profile
« Reply #22 on: Apr 22, 2006, 07:06PM »

"why music?"

Why not?

A lot of good points were made....and the only one of Thomas Matta's "Some people like to...." examples that didn't fit me was the American Idol example.

My life has always revolved around music...listening, making, or composing...it has always been what makes me tick.

My parents found a very effective punishment for me when I snuck out of the house when I was 14....they took away my music!  No radio, no piano, no horn...no music for a week.  

I thought

I was going

to die.

No, I'm not kidding.

You seem a little frustrated with music right now, Frank.  Do you need to vent a little?
Logged

Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming -- WOW--What a Ride!
JP
*
*
Offline Offline

Location: San Diego, California, USA
Joined: Sep 6, 2000
Posts: 4163

View Profile
« Reply #23 on: Apr 22, 2006, 08:49PM »

Get any group of people of any age, of any mentality, set them down in a room. Let them do whatever they want.

Bring in a good live musician, any talent you can imagine. Singer, player, DJ, banjo picker, elementary school band, anything. Have them play something, anything, they do well.

I guarantee that people will hover around them, reminisce about all kinds of things.

People often talk about how music is the universal language. That is true.

I call it the magnet of living.

It draws and attracts people of any culture to it. So what, you never heard that kind of music before? You gonna jump up and stop the performance? I think not. You will sit there and try to feel the importance of what the musicians are trying to do.

Whether it is HipHop or marching band, jazz or classical, the interested musician listens before he/she says, "Nice, but I will pass on that." If it is performed well, they will most likely say, "Cool".
Logged

JP
Trombonists just slide through life
Frank B
« Reply #24 on: Apr 22, 2006, 11:04PM »

Quote from: "Precious"
You seem a little frustrated with music right now, Frank.  Do you need to vent a little?

Nope. Music is fine. Thanks for asking though. I just have an odd little tick in my head that looks up and simply asks, why. Sometimes looking at things like this:
Quote from: "Laci Leblanc"
I can tell you why I personally love music. 1. I gain satisfaction from improving. 2. It's taught me great amounts of discipline. 3. If I have nothing else, music will be there. 4. Through it I am able to meet people. My best friends are those I have met through music. 5. For me, playing and pleasuring audiences by creating art with people you care about is a truly enriching experience.

and wonder specifically why music. Her reasons could easily transfer to other forms of art, and with a bit more effort- to sports and athleticism.

Beyond that, I really do not think I've ever heard anyone ask this question. And when I challenge the very high importance of the arts to peers in various art paths in college they suddenly get in a huff- simply defending it as an art and that that alone makes it important. Even in this very thread, what is music is challenged and that seems ok, but to challenge music as a whole? I get many backs raised for that, and I am curious to know why. What is it about music that does that? It is a strong reason that is very hard to define, or a very weak one that is emberassing when defined?

Simply enjoyment, or liking it- these things wouldn't cause the vast proliferation of music that we have, nor would they likly have lasted thousands of years through various traditions, as music has.


Beyond that, say your ABC's- 10 to 1 odds there is some semblance to the alphabet song that first time. Schoolhouse rock- lessons to music- "we the people, in order to form a more perfect union...", "conjunction junction, what's your funtion? Hooking up nouns, and phrases and clauses", memorable things- even if silly. In recent study into a few west african countries, I found that there were historians who were musicians. They are musicians by lineage, and can trace their lineage back to about year 1234, when a great king came to power. That's a lot of years, and a lot of information. They learn it by song. So I wonder, as I wander...
Logged
Precious
Omar the Tent Maker

*
Offline Offline

Location: Behind a sewing machine
Joined: Mar 29, 2004
Posts: 3296

View Profile
« Reply #25 on: Apr 23, 2006, 05:44AM »

Quote from: "Frank B"
Quote from: "Precious"
You seem a little frustrated with music right now, Frank.  Do you need to vent a little?

Nope. Music is fine. Thanks for asking though.


Ok...Just checking.  :)  I tend to ask questions like that when I hit rock bottom, so to speak.

Quote
Beyond that, I really do not think I've ever heard anyone ask this question. And when I challenge the very high importance of the arts to peers in various art paths in college they suddenly get in a huff- simply defending it as an art and that that alone makes it important. Even in this very thread, what is music is challenged and that seems ok, but to challenge music as a whole? I get many backs raised for that, and I am curious to know why. What is it about music that does that? It is a strong reason that is very hard to define, or a very weak one that is emberassing when defined?


Maybe you get more fur ruffled because of something more simplistic: you are asking a question to which people have no answer.

You are questioning basic motivation for some people, and not everyone will have an answer.  I know I had to sit and think about my answer for a while.  Some people will have a complex answer, and others a simple one.  There is no concrete answer for your question....as the answers will all be different.

Think of it this way....

Life has a rhythm.

Walking, talking, and breathing being the first rhythms we learn as children.  Some, like breathing, come naturally.  Some rhythms are taught to us when we are infants, and our mothers rocked us to comfort us.

Nature has a rhythm, and I had a "EUREKA" moment this summer, when (out on the Blue Ridge Parkway....I noticed your post in the bunker) I realized that life is a symphony.  

Ok, I'm wierd, I'll admit it.  BUT....listen to the birds.  Their song is easily heard.  Engines of passing cars, construction equipment, trees rustling, kids laughing....they all have tones - almost pitches - that you can hear....put them together and there is an entire symphony going on outside your window.  Even inside....the vacuum cleaner, the microwave, the fridge, the washer and dryer, the cat purring.  Am I making sense here or have I lost a few extra marbles?

I found with my two kids that there was something more calming about me singing (even if off key) to them than just talking to them.  With my daughter, singing silly songs that I made up on a whim will distract her from one of her terrifying tantrums, she sings the alphabet song all the time, even if her words make no sense.  I taught my son to say "I love you" by using the notes "Fa, La, Sol" and even now that he is 9, and not 18 months (his age when I'd sing it to him) he will sing it to me.


Our life is rarely without music.

I'd rather have the radio (or music channels on tv) on, than some sit-com.  The radio is on in the truck, and we sing to it.  Boo's favorite channel is "Big Band and Swing" and when it is on, she will sing with it even if she doesn't know the words or even the tune, and she will dance to it.  Its good for her body and her mind.

There have been studies (please forgive my lack of sources right now) that show how Mozart is incredibly calming to difficult children, how it focuses your brain making studying easier, and some will argue that it increases your IQ.  

My parents sing in the church choir, and have for many years.  My dad's mother (who lived next door to me until her death when I was seven) was the organist at church.  My mom sang to me all the time...silly made up songs to make me laugh...and those songs have now been passed to my kids.  I spent a lot of time with my grammy when I was little.  I'd stay with her while mom and dad had to work, she would take me to preschool and play group, but I spent a lot of time with her.

HER house was never without music either.  Her collection of music was classical, and on LP.  She would put on Peter and the Wolf for me to take my nap by.  She would put on Haydn and play along on her piano and let me dance and sing to it.

She was my first piano teacher...I was 4 and had to BEG my mom AND her to get lessons.  My grammy lit my fire when it came to music, and I think now, 20+ years after her death, that she would be proud of what I can get out of a piano and a trombone.  

My point in my rambles....

Second only to being a mother, I am a musician.  No matter where life takes me - be it a crap job working part time for peanuts, or being a funeral director, I'll always be a musician.  It is a part of me.  I can express myself better with my piano than I can my words.  It is my comfort, my refuge, the ultimate language barrier breaker aparter.  Everyone understands the emotion of music, even if the languages the listeners use are different.

So again...you ask "Why music" and my response is still "Why not?"  I'm not in a huff...mainly because my unspoken answer is laughable, but I'm not sure if people would understand the other answer any easier than they understand my short answer.

Frank asked:  "Why music?"

Precious laughs and answers "Why do you breathe, Frank?  Because it is what you do.  I have music, and make music, because it is what *I* do."

Good!
Logged

Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming -- WOW--What a Ride!
Pages: 1 [2]  All   Go Up
Print
Jump to: