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Author Topic: Theory---Largest..or Smallest?  (Read 94467 times)
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Georgilocks
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« Reply #200 on: Jun 29, 2017, 08:02PM »


How do you know how big your oral cavity is in comparison to the rest of the human race? Is there an internet test you can take? Or have you viewed a large pool of oral cavities of other people?

Well, to be quite frank I know it to be quite true as my face is much smaller than many others and I have a fairly square jaw. No evidence of course to support this, but it is assumed lol.
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bigbassbone1

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« Reply #201 on: Jun 29, 2017, 08:17PM »

Well, to be quite frank I know it to be quite true as my face is much smaller than many others and I have a fairly square jaw. No evidence of course to support this, but it is assumed lol.


Sure..... it just seems like a weird assumption to make. You said it was like an inch bigger than "normal" or whatever. I just haven't heard somebody talk about their mouthpiece choice as being influenced by their seemingly massive oral cavity, and I am not convinced you can diagnose having a bigger than normal oral cavity due to having a small face and square jaw... more power to you though if you are sure thats what you need and why!
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svenlarsson

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« Reply #202 on: Jun 30, 2017, 02:47AM »

Hm. My dentist told me that I have an unusually high mouthcavity. so a good way to find out is to ask your dentist.
Mouthpiece? I play pieces from 11 C to one of bigest tuba mpc.
I donīt know if that is conected.
Doug may have somthing to say?
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harrison.t.reed
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« Reply #203 on: Jul 01, 2017, 11:22AM »

It's not all about the rim though, guys. The cup size, shape, and throat/backbore have a bigger effect on sound and response. The rim should be just what feels right.

There is no way I could play sustained high notes on a Griego 1F. With a 1C, which has the same rim, it's easy to do. It's pretty surpising how different a piece feels and plays when you change the factors that aren't the rim.

If a rim feels wrong, don't play it. Largest vs. Smallest is not as useful as just finding a rim size that let's your chops feel good. Change up the cup and throat afterwards, if you're at the level where that matters (but not at the level where it doesn't )
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« Reply #204 on: Jul 01, 2017, 11:39AM »

Wow, that's a cup-full!

I always thought my tone sounded more-or-less the same through various rim sizes and it was the cup shape/depth, bore/back-bore that made the differences in accentuating the highs or the lows.

A shallower cup almost always feels like it's the rim that is smaller on my chops.

I really don't care what rim size I'm playing, as long as it is doing the work for me and not me doing the work for it.

...Geezer
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bigbassbone1

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« Reply #205 on: Jul 12, 2017, 08:49PM »

It's not all about the rim though, guys. The cup size, shape, and throat/backbore have a bigger effect on sound and response. The rim should be just what feels right.

There is no way I could play sustained high notes on a Griego 1F. With a 1C, which has the same rim, it's easy to do. It's pretty surpising how different a piece feels and plays when you change the factors that aren't the rim.

If a rim feels wrong, don't play it. Largest vs. Smallest is not as useful as just finding a rim size that let's your chops feel good. Change up the cup and throat afterwards, if you're at the level where that matters (but not at the level where it doesn't )

I find it really hard to know if a rim size "feels" right or not. I do go off feeling in some of my playing, it feels almost the same to freebuzz notes high or low as it does to play them on my instrument regardless of mouthpiece rim size....
When I am choosing a mouthpiece I go with whatever one gives me the best sound all around. It doesn't mean much if a mouthpiece feels great but sounds bad to me. Id rather put in a little extra work if I have to so I sound better rather than feel good. If im having trouble sustaining high notes, but im making a good sound with good articulation I will practice it so I can do it, rather than change gear. Even if a different mouthpiece made those high notes easier to sustain, in my experience, that same piece that made those notes easier will make some other aspect of playing harder that the old piece made easier.
I might change my mind in the future, but in the experiences I have had up to date, I haven't really found that its better to sacrifice sound for comfort. I find also that comfort can be decieving.... if something feels great on my face it can be difficult to identify that the sound is inferior. I actually currently own a custom piece that is like a schilke 60 but has a wide cushion style rim and enlarged shank so you play with no leadpipe. I find on that piece high and low register are easier than on my laskey 93D and it feels much better to play on all round but even so, the sound quality I get with it simply isn't as good as on my Laskey so I cant justify using it.
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harrison.t.reed
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« Reply #206 on: Jul 13, 2017, 05:47AM »

I think you missed my point. I agree though that it's all about sound. Your custom piece might need a different cup/backbore.
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T-396A - Griego 1C
88HTCL - Griego 1C
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bigbassbone1

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« Reply #207 on: Jul 13, 2017, 02:03PM »

I think you missed my point. I agree though that it's all about sound. Your custom piece might need a different cup/backbore.


Maybe I missed your point... dunno. I guess my point was how do you know if a rim is the right size for you? I have had a couple of main mouthpieces in the last few years and both had drastically different size and shape rims. The Rim wasn't why i played either one though, it was the sound each one made. How do you know if one consistent rim size gives you a better sound attached to any cup and backbore?
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FlamingRain
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« Reply #208 on: Jul 13, 2017, 02:48PM »

You know - I never would have guessed that I would be playing a rim the size that I do now (1.06") but the other day I tried to play on a 12c and it probably was the worst experience of my life. I barely could play below an F in the staff  , and you'd think that I would be able to play higher? Nope. I could barely squeak out a  I sounded like a 4th grader - but I guess that's just MY personal preference. Even when I play alto now I play on the the same rim, playing something smaller generally screws up my chops. I have started to come to terms with the fact that the rim should be your personal preference, with the cup and backbone matching the instrument for the sound. So for me, bigger is generally better. For me.
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Sascha Burckhardt

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« Reply #209 on: Jul 13, 2017, 03:41PM »

The correct rim size is one that allows you to play as high or higher, and as low or lower, than you need to perform, with a good focused sound, and without needing to shift.

Too small and you will need to shift for low range (which works but it tends to destroy high range).  Too big and you will lose focus and lose endurance.  For most players those parameters define a small range of rim size.

All of that is assuming you are playing with your embouchure's correct form and mechanics.  If you're not, the results will be skewed.
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