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The Trombone ForumTeaching & LearningPedagogy(Moderators: JP, Doug Elliott) Teaching trombone to small children
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savio

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« Reply #60 on: Jan 30, 2013, 04:20PM »

I get lot of ideas just by reading what all write here. Children want to learn, keep in mind they are easy to let down.

I have a few rules for my self. They are not for all teachers around.

For me as a teacher:

1. Be my self. Always....
2. Tell the truth, but with very understandable words.
3. Don't tell to much, keep it simple and clear.
4. Have a goal to make the child have a good time...
5. Make my self updated, in good shape, and learn as much as possible about my trombone/music

How to know the child:

1. Be there 100% with all my consentration or try to do
2. Break the ice, talk about other things than trombone. Its not waist of time...
3. Talk a lot with the parents, about everything.
4. When they come in the door, be polite and careful. We never know what day they had.

How I teach:

1. Know what I can teach and what I cant teach.
2. Don't be afraid to ask other teachers.
3. Be consequent, don't suddenly change.
4. Don't fall in the trap to do all the lesson like a routine, give my self a goal to teach the children something new everyday.


OK this is just some few thoughts. After teaching children for many years I know one thing. Be involved, be interested, listen and understand every child as good we can. But its impossible to be perfect. Same as playing trombone. Where is the fun? The fun is trying everyday...that's the fun!


Leif
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Bass Trombone - Conn, Holton
JP
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« Reply #61 on: Jan 30, 2013, 04:49PM »

Excellent post Leif  Good!

The only things I would add is be organized:

Have your handouts (warm-up sheets, books to use, etc.) ready. Do not waste time looking through your stacks of music for the thing you want for that student...have it ready.

Teach the student how to practice: playing slow, repeating passages correctly, how to structure a practice session. It is often not what to learn, but how to learn.

I really like what you posted, my friend.
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KevinHornbuckle

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« Reply #62 on: Jan 30, 2013, 05:18PM »

Very sound guidelines, Leif.
At the moment my son is working through Ravel, Mozart, and Wagner for an audition coming up in a few days. His teachers have been as you describe, and its is only motivation that gets a student through this difficult material. Learning how to learn is the biggest part. But I think the kids do not understand that until much later because it is so abstract. Kindness and encouragement go so far with kids. My son is very fortunate to have had skillful teachers.
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benjamintrb
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« Reply #63 on: Apr 06, 2014, 06:41AM »

Wow, what a resource this thread has been to me... Thank you to all the great players/teachers who have contributed.

I have a specific issue that might have been posted about already, I apologize if it is repetitive...

I currently have a 7 yr old student on a pbone. He is doing well, and can support the instrument very easily so that is not an issue. He actually has a decent range, being able to play his chromatic scale from 1-6"ish" low Bb to F, F to C, and Bb to F.

The issue is his teeth, clamping down while playing/buzzing. I have encountered this with beginner players before (6th grade or so), but have had good success getting them to open up. The 7yr old not so much though.

We work with a breathing tube (piece of water line, PVC) to try and instill the idea of open breathing, and we actively work on oral shape. Imitating "OH" and "HO" and going straight to the MP/horn. We have had very brief periods of success but it has not stuck with him out of the lesson room...

Any suggestions?
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« Reply #64 on: Jun 22, 2014, 05:25AM »

I like using metaphors with my younger students. Have you tried asking him to play as if there is a hot potato inside his mouth (like one of those mini ones)? Or an egg, especially if the egg is tall rather than wide? If this does work, you could trying switching the syllable to "AW" I find this helps to keep the tongue out of the way more so than 'OH". Is he listening to recordings of professional trombonists? Having a clear concept of a beautiful sound is extremely important, otherwise, you're trying to hit a bullseye with your eyes closed. Good luck!!
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Sliphorn
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« Reply #65 on: Jun 22, 2014, 10:57AM »

I like using metaphors with my younger students. Have you tried asking him to play as if there is a hot potato inside his mouth (like one of those mini ones)? Or an egg, especially if the egg is tall rather than wide? If this does work, you could trying switching the syllable to "AW" I find this helps to keep the tongue out of the way more so than 'OH". Is he listening to recordings of professional trombonists? Having a clear concept of a beautiful sound is extremely important, otherwise, you're trying to hit a bullseye with your eyes closed. Good luck!!
I spent about a month doing an hour-long routine every day playing with my teeth closed (touching) so I could get used to playing up and down the horn better without having to drop my jaw so much.  I believe that brass players should play with their jaws as closed as possible while still achieving a good sound.  And I think most players can eventually achieve a GREAT sound with jaws much more closed than they would think.  I see the methodology of "dropping the jaw" as responsible for a lot of brass failures, no chops, frustration, quitting.  How can a player get really great compression in an embouchure when the mechanics of an open jaw dictate that the lips are further apart than they might otherwise be?  And...if there's a big gap between the tips of the teeth, what will support the lips (especially trumpet)?

Just food for thought. 
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« Reply #66 on: Feb 28, 2015, 07:05AM »

I'm surprised no one mentioned the importance of a good air supply with small children. Very important for beginners and advanced players alike: take a good breath before each phrase. It should be instilled as a  natural habit. I am not saying to overfill with air either. This is most important for small children because they have smaller lungs than adults. Just refill your air before you are too close to running out. The child will attempt to squeeze the last bit of air just to complete a phrase. Well that is extremely bad. To develop a good sound and to develop the embouchure one needs air to the lips. Before one has the feeling they are squeezing out the air, just stop, skip some notes if playing in a group, take a breath, and resume. This is what Crisafulli taught me in my first few lessons as a beginner at age 12.
« Last Edit: Mar 01, 2015, 06:26AM by patrickosmith » Logged
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