Conn 50H....Proffesional horn?

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BigBone:
Hey all,
I am looking into getting a medium bore tenor bone, and I have several horns in mind at the moment, and am trying to decide which will be best for me.
One of these horns is a Conn 50H. This particular example is in mint condition, and looks superb.
Anyway, I have been looking around, and everywhere the 50H seems to be listed as a student or intermediate horn. Is this true? I was wondering, as at the time when the 50H was first introduced, it was a kind of step up bass trombone, so a student bass trombone due to bore size, not quality or craftsmanship. Is this true, or do they lack in quality and craftsmanship? I want a professional quality horn.
Also, the serial number (number on the slide, I am not massively familiar with Conn horns, and the seller says this is the nly number he can find) is 170113. The bell engraving isnt the latest version, but certainly not one of the earlier versions...I dont think. Can anyone date this horn, or tell me where the serial number is if this one isnt it. I will ask the seller as I am only in contact with him through email. Here is the engraving on the bell

Thanks very much all!
Best Wishes.
Matt Denney. :good: :good:

Johnny_verhoeven:
The classifications student, intermedium mean nothing they are an invention of the marketing guys.

The question is : is it a good horn for you. That is the only thing that counts.
Do a blind test and find out.

BGuttman:
Firstly, the serial number is not representative of the age of this instrument.  A 1xxxxx Conn would be from the 1920's or so, and the 50H was introduced after the move to Abilene in 1965.

The 50H was offered as a "student Bass"; it is still a member of the Director family.  There is a "basic Pro" horn called the 52H which is almost the same instrument.

All that aside, the only reasons to buy a Pro horn over this one is:

1.  Your friends would tease you because you don't have a "Pro" horn.  If this is the case, get some new friends, or play them into the ground with the 50H.

2.  You are planning to be a professional trombonist and audition for the Royal Philharmonic next week.

You said you have several to look at.  Look at them all.  See which one plays best.  A Student horn will probably fight you in the extreme upper register, so check this one out in that range.  Buy whatever plays best.  If appearance is a factor (judges downgrading you because of 50% lacquer), then by all means look at appearance.

Good luck, whatever you get.

BigBone:
Ok thanks. I guess the number is not the serial number then.
I will look at the other horns I have in mind anyway. This horn isnt exactly what I was after, but for the money being asked, if it was a pro quality horn then it would be a pretty good price, not so sure now. I might aswell just get what I really want instead of comprimising anyway, and that is a HNW 2B Silvertone :amazed: :razz:

Elkhart 88H:
Quote from: BGuttman on Apr 07, 2007, 07:38AM

Firstly, the serial number is not representative of the age of this instrument.  A 1xxxxx Conn would be from the 1920's or so, and the 50H was introduced after the move to Abilene in 1965.

The information I've found on the sale of Conn to CCM and the move to Abilene puts the sale in 1969 and the move in 1972.  The plant that CCM bought was owned by the F.A. Reynolds Company, a division of Norlin Music.  Norlin sold the plant to CCM in 1972 when they consolidated Olds and Reynolds production at the Olds plant in Fullerton, California.

The 50H was first catalogued around 1965, which means that the earliest examples of the breed were made in Elkhart.  It's considered a student horn, but I've played several that were great-playing instruments.

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