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jhallohio

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« on: Jul 14, 2007, 08:03PM »

Im a junior in high school and have been trying to think of a college with a good music program, not only for trombone, but for all aspects of music.  I also wanted to ask about Universtiy Of Dayton's music program.  They are close and have offered me some money to go play for them.  But as having a couple more years to search, I would  like to have some suggestions to help ease the search
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Dave Joyce

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« Reply #1 on: Jul 14, 2007, 09:18PM »

Perhaps you have heard of Miami University in Oxford, Ohio - it's about 45 minutes north of Cincinnati.  I graduated from Miami in trombone performance.

http://www.fna.muohio.edu/musweb/
 

The main draw for a guy like you, in my opinion, would be to work with Jaime Morales Matos, the trombone professor there.  He is a phenomenal player - extremely musical in his phrasing, great concept of sound, and an extremely charismatic and entertaining performer.  He taught me soooo much about playing and performing.  It's also a smaller studio and you'll have the opportunity for some more individual attention than you might get at a conservatory like CCM (which, don't get me wrong, is a great school).   

Miami is also quite strong in it's World music programs, with a fast growing "Global Rhythms" ensemble, Balinese Gamelan ensembles, Steel Drum Bands, etc.

If you're going into Jazz... forget it.  Miami is admittedly not the place for you.  But if you're wanting to go the classical route, I'd seriously consider Miami and try to arrange a lesson with Jaime - you'd be hard pressed to find a more enjoyable teacher.       

P.S. - The campus is absolutely GORGEOUS, and the small town of Oxford is full of great people. 
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Dave Joyce
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« Reply #2 on: Jul 14, 2007, 11:06PM »

CCM, CIM, Oberlin. . . There are lots of good schools in Ohio. 

I did CCM a few years back, and although the school itself is large, the studio is small enough to get plenty of one-on-one with the prof. (about 18-20 members).

Check the places out first and maybe get a lesson with the professor.  Go with the school giving you good vibes.
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Ruckus
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« Reply #3 on: Jul 15, 2007, 03:29PM »

OSU is also a decent school, but you may want to take a few lessons with both Joe Duchi and Jim Masters first.  I'm not sure about studio size, but if they recognize you, you'll probably have a better chance of getting in.  Personally, I love Joe Duchi, I played alongside him for a side by side concert (CYSO and CSO) (both Columbus, OH), playing Wagner (imagine, 6 trombones, 2 tubas, 6 trumpets, at least 8-10 horns).  Joe, and the rest of the section were terrific guys and players.  Jim Masters is also a great player, albeit, I've only really heard his playing with the CJO, because if anyone ever comes in to work with CYJO, it's Vaughn Wiester.  Also, Columbus has some great opportunities for young musicians, and just this past year, we had 3 master classes with: Jon Fedchock, Phil Wilson, and Wycliffe Gordon.

Also, just remember OSU is a huge school, so if you aren't into large schools, then it might not be right for you.

Anyways, that's my schtick for Columbus.  Good luck with your college search.
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djdekok

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« Reply #4 on: Jul 15, 2007, 05:04PM »

I can't speak to the trombone studios at either Dayton or Miami--but I can speak to their respective director of bands...

Gary Speck is at Miami.  I knew Gary as a student at the University of Michigan.  Friendly, serious, a FINE conductor and a fine human being.

Patrick Reynolds (Dayton)I also knew from U-M.  He was a fine trumpet player and conductor then and is now, I'm sure.  I attended a couple classes with his wife Sonya Szabo, who teaches piano at Xavier.

Hope this helps...good luck!
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Daniel De Kok
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Nate Rocheck
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« Reply #5 on: Jul 15, 2007, 05:05PM »

The Baldwin-Wallace College Conservatory of Music is located about 15 miles south of Cleveland. The trombone professor is Allen Kofsky, who spent the better part of 40 years in the Cleveland Orchestra, and is an absolute beast of a player. It's a relatively small school, so there are plenty of opportunities to play in ensembles, and gigging in the area isn't too bad either right now. There are a lot of great concerts in the Cleveland area, and we have had a range of master classes and guest performers over the past few years.
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Dave Joyce

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« Reply #6 on: Jul 15, 2007, 09:54PM »

I can't speak to the trombone studios at either Dayton or Miami--but I can speak to their respective director of bands...

Gary Speck is at Miami.  I knew Gary as a student at the University of Michigan.  Friendly, serious, a FINE conductor and a fine human being.

Here, here! 

I thought about mentioning Gary Speck in my first response to this post.  He is the director of bands at Miami, and like djdekok says, he is great.  Definatley one of my favorite profs at Miami.  Just a solid, caring, passionate human being as well as a great conductor.  And he knows how to pick good music.  During my time there, we played some pretty cool stuff with Speck... Husa's Music for Prague, David Maslanka Symphony no. 2,  Tichelli's Blue Shades, Michael Daugherty's Niagra Falls, Lincolnshire Posy, Carter Pann's Slalom, Michael Torke's Bliss...

...the list goes on. 
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Dave Joyce
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« Reply #7 on: Aug 05, 2007, 08:41PM »

im going to Cedarville University, about an hour and change from Cinci and a half hour from Dayton and about an hour from Columbus. Andy Millat of the Columbus Symphony is the prof....
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« Reply #8 on: Aug 06, 2007, 08:41AM »

I will second Nate's comment about Baldwin-Wallace. Allen Kofsky is a great teacher as well as a player. Also, their theory department has been very strong, led over 50 years by 2 people: Delbert Beswick and Lawrence Hartzell.
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AUTbone11

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« Reply #9 on: Aug 23, 2007, 03:26PM »

If you're looking for jazz, Ashland University has a budding jazz program that will be seeing an influx of some tbone students (myself included). We travel to Spain in the spring semester and participate in the Maplerock jazz festival. It's a smaller department so you get personal touch without losing any professionalism: Dr. Scott Garlock is the jazz guy, and with a hilarious wit and a few shakes of the slide he can really go places with his jazz band.

You should check it out.
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jhallohio

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« Reply #10 on: Aug 25, 2007, 08:19PM »

thanks for all the input, but im mostly looking for a college that does more classical stuff ive never really played jazz because my school doesn't offer anything else other than band and pep band so i wont be much help in the jazz department :dontknow :cry:
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Ruckus
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« Reply #11 on: Aug 26, 2007, 12:04PM »

im going to Cedarville University, about an hour and change from Cinci and a half hour from Dayton and about an hour from Columbus. Andy Millat of the Columbus Symphony is the prof....

Andy Millat is a great guy, I had the pleasure of sitting with him during our side-by-side concert with the Columbus Symphony Orchestra, and I loved his playing.  In fact, I enjoyed the entire section.  Imagine, we played Wagners Ride of the Valkyries, with 2 bones on a part.  I vaguely remember one of those plastic sound shields that I was surprised survived after the ordeal.   
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metalhead\m/

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« Reply #12 on: Aug 30, 2007, 06:08PM »

i go to the university of akron, and love it,  the brass faculty here have been together for 27 years this year, so that really says something, if you want some more info, feel free to pm me
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Dobbins

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« Reply #13 on: Sep 14, 2007, 04:16PM »

I am very dissapointed that no one has mention Bowling Green State University yet.  They have a large, very good music program which focuses mostly on classical music.  William Mathis is the trombone professor, and he is quite accomplished, having received a bachelor from Wichita State, and a Masters and a Doctorate from U. of Michigan.  If you are looking for a music program that specializes more in classical than in jazz, Bowling Green should be one of your top priorities.
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Silversonic88

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« Reply #14 on: Sep 25, 2007, 05:35AM »

i have to recommend oberlin. I just graduated with a BM in may. I really liked it there. Im actually hoping to go back and do the new music ed masters program they are starting. James DeSano teaches there, retired principal of the cleveland orchestra. he his hands down the best teacher i've ever had. the studio is pretty small these days so theres lots of playing opportunities. there are great ensembles at oberlin, from baroque orchestra to contemporary music ensemble. only downsides i can think of are that its a really small town (which i loved, but some people might not like. its about a 45 minute drive to cleveland) and there are a lot of hippies there, but overall a tremendous school.
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Alan James

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awesomely simple, that's creativity."
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