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Author Topic: tuning slide grease  (Read 8471 times)
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« on: Jul 16, 2001, 05:50PM »

um... i havent reallly used anything but the conn brand tuning slide grease and i dont plan on too either... it works great and i was wandering what other people use for themselves?
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« Reply #1 on: Jul 17, 2001, 06:11PM »

I have used Vaseline for many years without any problems, as long as I don't use too much.
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« Reply #2 on: Jul 17, 2001, 07:30PM »

Hey,


 Until recently I have used Vasaline. It works very well, only problem is it dries fast. So, I switched to Lanolin cream, I use well less than half the amount I would using valsaline and its much smoother and lasts longer.


Josh
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« Reply #3 on: Jul 17, 2001, 08:01PM »

I use Vasoline and melt it into the metal with a kitchen match or a torch then wipe off the excess. That will last a few years.
Jeff
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« Reply #4 on: Jul 17, 2001, 08:24PM »

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Grah

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« Reply #5 on: Jul 17, 2001, 08:32PM »

I have used the red stuff for 20 years (either conn or benge, not sure about that) works great. Tried anhydrous lanolin, it is okay, not what it is cracked up to be.

Vaseline stinks, don't bother.

By all means,do not use The Grease! I have seen many frozen slides when that crap dries out.
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JP
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« Reply #6 on: Jul 17, 2001, 08:45PM »

AAh the red stuff i love that stuff excpt when i use too much. then i set my horn down and watch the tuning slide slowly close.  But seriously that stuff is great and it works great.        
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Paul Hill

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« Reply #7 on: Jul 17, 2001, 09:00PM »

I use Dow Corning Vacuum Grease...it is clear, odorless and a tube will last FOREVER!

I had been using Yamaha Tuning Slide Grease on my YBL 622 but found that it broke down very quickly, so I emailed Doug Yeo to ask what he uses...this is the stuff.

I apologize for not having the source for you, my household goods are enroute Newport, RI and I do not have access to this info.  I can get it to anyone interested in about a month.  I would try ordering it through a scientific supply house...

There was a time when I used Vaseline AND Pond's...works fine but not for me (too stinky!).  As I recall, the Vaseline caused quite a bit of tarnishing.

Best Regards,
Paul
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« Reply #8 on: Jul 18, 2001, 08:05AM »

Doug

I use the Selmer-tuning slide lubricant.  It is a red colour and works great.  A lot stiffer than vaseline, so the e pull on my F attachment is a little hard to use.

Davo
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« Reply #9 on: Jul 18, 2001, 08:57AM »

quote:
Originally posted by Paul Hill:
I use Dow Corning Vacuum Grease...it is clear, odorless and a tube will last FOREVER!



Dow Corning high vacuum grease - silicone lubricant? That's a great idea, and I've got about 10 tubes of it in my lab. How convienent, I think I'll try it out tonight!

Stacy

PS - any vacuum supply company should have this, try MDC (1-800-443-8817, $25, 5.3 oz) Varian Vacuum (1-800-882-7426, $12, 5.3 oz) or Kurt J. Lesker (1-800-245-1656, $14.35, 5.3 oz)
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« Reply #10 on: Jul 18, 2001, 09:02AM »

Conn.  It's the best.
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« Reply #11 on: Jul 18, 2001, 05:08PM »

Wow, I used to use Vasoline for tuning slide (on school bone), and I didn't know other people did too!
I used to think it wasnt that 'healthy' for the tuning slide, but it was good because I was always too lazy to go get some tuning slize grease so I guess the Vasoline sufficed.

..now, could I use Bach Slide Cream for my current Bach bone tuning slide, or would it be better for me to go buy actual tuning slide grease?
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« Reply #12 on: Jul 19, 2001, 09:06AM »

quote:
Originally posted by Tiger:
...now, could I use Bach Slide Cream for my current Bach bone tuning slide, or would it be better for me to go buy actual tuning slide grease?

Slide cream  

If you lube up your tuning slide with slide cream you will find your pitch changing by the second as the slide moves in or out (or falls out - clunk!)

The main issue I had with Vaseline Petroleum Jelly was that it got really soft at high temperatures (above 80F, 28C) and the slide would move by itself.  Less likely (but still happens) with the lanolin.  Stopcock grease is good, but hard to find unless you are a geek chemist (chemical engineer?) like me  

At least nobody is going to look at you funny if you show up at the checkout register with a tube of breast cream  
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Bruce Guttman
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« Reply #13 on: Jul 19, 2001, 10:18PM »

A trumpet friend (imagine that!) of mine borrows some of my trombotine for use on his tuning slide - he smears it on and wipes off the excess, plus a little more.  He said that the trombotine has taken some of the tarnish off his tuning slide.  The only explanation I could think of was that the tuning slide was brass and the slide stocking is silver.  Any thoughts?
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« Reply #14 on: Jul 20, 2001, 08:07AM »

I've never known Trombotine to remove tarnish, but I do know trumpet players who lube their tuning slides like trombone slides.  Usually the 1st and 3rd valve slides, since these are moved a lot in adjusting intonation.  

I have a similar situation with my Euphonium.  It has a spring-loaded 3rd valve slide so I can use it to adjust intonation (although it only works on a few notes!).  I lube that slide to move easily.

You have to be careful with a really loose tuning slide, especially a valve slide.  On my euphonium I have actually blown out the 2nd valve slide playing loud  
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Bruce Guttman
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« Reply #15 on: Jul 20, 2001, 08:14AM »

I think most trombonists for most of the 20th century used Vaseline on tuning sldies with no problem.  Ceratinly I did, and so did everyone I knew. Same with Pond's cold cream for slides. When I came back to playing after 25 years, I discovered that neither was widely in use. I wonder if the disappearance of Vaseline wasn't a shrewd marketing ploy by the instrument manufacturers?
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« Reply #16 on: Jul 20, 2001, 04:58PM »

Vaseline got a bad rap on the Trombone-L and other places due to supposed tarnishing and corrosion.  Like you state, nearly everyone used Vaseline for most of this century.  You know how it goes, my tuning slide is stuck and corroded.  Can't be my fault, must be the Vaseline.  I played my horn a lot in Central and Southern Illinois when I was younger, and the Vaseline held up just fine.  I mainly switched to the Hetman because I found the small canister of Hetman easier to find a place for in my case than a jar of Vaseline.  Since the Hetman worked fine, I stuck with it.  

Anyway, I currently use Hetman 8 on my "normal" tuning slides.  I have seen Dow Corning High Vacuum grease mentioned here.  Doug Yeo and I endorsed this stuff on the Trombone-L for use with loose tuning slides.  It is a bit hard to get hold of, but it will keep a slide where you want it and seal it at the same time, no matter how worn or loose.  I have found the Hetman 9 to seal just as good as the Dow Corning, and it keeps a loose slide in place just fine.  It is also easier to get since it can be ordered from any of the usual mail order houses.  The problem with both Dow Corning and #9 is that they are really hard to get OFF of the horn (or anything else).  Makes cleaning fun.

Roche-Thomas makes a very good tuning slide grease if you live up north.  It really lubricates well, but is a bit thin for loose slides.  It also has a rather low melting point and can get quite messy in hot weather.
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« Reply #17 on: Jul 20, 2001, 07:14PM »

There are lots of lubricants available for us to spend our hard earned gigging dollars on. Why not try anhydrous lanolin (relatively cheap)? If this is too thick or heavy, etc.... place a tiny drop of valve oil on the tuning slide once the lanolin is in place. Should work fine.. I use this on
both small and large bore Edwards.
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« Reply #18 on: Jul 20, 2001, 07:25PM »

Hettman, yes. The tuba and trumpet players and me, that have discovered this love it. It is very well described in the WW & BW catalog.

Piston oil, rotor oil (different weights), tuning slide, etc. I love it. Binak 495 is okay, I like the Hettman products better myself.

I have a lot of the red stuff tuning slide grease to use up, after that it is Hettman's for me.

BTW, I went through the anhydrous lanolin thing about 30 years ago. It is okay, not the best though. Gooey, ugly stuff. Larry Minick recommended axle grease. P.U.

I recommend either the red stuff or Hettmans.
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« Reply #19 on: Jul 20, 2001, 08:54PM »

Great post, Ken!

However, I have had a slightly different experience with the Dow Corning Vacuum Grease.  It comes right off with either a paper towel (lint free!) or one of my daughter's old diapers (clean, of course!).

Regarding availability...it is as easy to obtain as emailing any scientific supply house and asking for it. I believe that my source was identified in a previous email which should be available in the archives. I will fwd to the Forum when my household goods are received (I am moving!). I believe it was "Fisher Scientific" but I'll have to check...

I really like the Dow Corning Vacuum Grease, especially on my 2V Bass Tbn.

Best Regards,
Paul
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