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Author Topic: Just Intonation Composition  (Read 51228 times)
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Andrew Meronek

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« Reply #80 on: Mar 07, 2013, 11:33AM »

Silly me - having trouble keeping up with the times . . .

I found another website that looks cool for people who might be interested in not only just intonation, but microtonality in general:

http://xenharmonic.wikispaces.com/

Various topics covered include just intonation, historical temperaments, ethnic music tuning systems, notations, mathematics - lots of good stuff.
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Andrew Meronek

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« Reply #81 on: Mar 19, 2013, 02:58PM »

For anyone who is interested, I just finished up a little editing project based on a tune I wrote a couple of years ago:

http://andrewmeronek.com/2013/03/19/sagittal-notation-score-and-computer-playback/

Included is a score and a .mp3 recording realized by Sibelius string quartet playback. The goal was to use this piece for myself to see how versatile Sagittal notation truly is for notating just intonation, and I dig it. Give it a listen and see if the arrows make sense with how you hear the pitch moving.  :)
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Andrew Meronek

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« Reply #82 on: Jun 01, 2013, 09:19AM »

Another blog update, pertinent to this thread:

http://andrewmeronek.com/2013/06/01/unintentional-pitch-drifting/

I hope that it is informational in particular to those of us who play in trombone quartets or brass quintets; smaller groups make these kinds of issues more apparent. But the concepts apply to pretty much everything.
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Andrew Meronek

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« Reply #83 on: Aug 06, 2013, 11:14PM »

I just finished a first draft of a Sagittal chord chart:

http://andrewmeronek.com/music-tools/sagittal-chord-chart/

This one is in Pure Sagittal; I'll add a Mixed Sagittal in a bit, with the normal sharps and flats instead of the double and triple arrow accidentals. Even without knowing exactly what all the symbols mean, it's very clear to see how often a purely-tuned chord sequence can result in a lot of small pitch movement. If the accidental changes, the pitch changes. Kind of brings the question to mind: "how much music do I listen to (and even how much music do I write) which is really in tune?"
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Strussman

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« Reply #84 on: May 07, 2014, 11:02AM »

I think there is a good place for this in tbone pedagogy.  Have you tried two sizes and/or widths and/or boldness of the arrows to indicate degree and direction and place the base of the arrow  :clever:on the line or space of the intended note?
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Andrew Meronek

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« Reply #85 on: May 12, 2014, 03:40PM »

I think there is a good place for this in tbone pedagogy.  Have you tried two sizes and/or widths and/or boldness of the arrows to indicate degree and direction and place the base of the arrow  Clever on the line or space of the intended note?

There's all of that already in Sagittal notation. It's pretty slick, and IMHO pretty useful. Next time I really want to nail a trombone soli in an orchestra performance, I have a mind to write in at least the syntonic commas with the help of a bit of score study.
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Andrew Meronek

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« Reply #86 on: Nov 24, 2014, 02:35PM »

It's been a little while, but I finally got another blog post on this subject up. I hope some of you find it interesting. This one is a bit more technical on the music theory level than my others thus far; be fairly warned.

http://andrewmeronek.com/music-tools/musings-on-otonality-and-utonality/
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« Reply #87 on: Dec 23, 2015, 07:09AM »

I wonder if you could use the old shape note methods of triangles, squares, etc. to prevent from having to read a note and an arrow.  Maybe add a new shape like a teardrop that points in the direction of the proper intonation.
Thanks,
Bill
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Andrew Meronek

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« Reply #88 on: Dec 23, 2015, 10:34AM »

I wonder if you could use the old shape note methods of triangles, squares, etc. to prevent from having to read a note and an arrow.  Maybe add a new shape like a teardrop that points in the direction of the proper intonation.
Thanks,
Bill

It's been done. The problem is one of legibility, that unless the noteheads are really big sometimes it's hard to distinguish between a circle and a square notehead. A teardrop would be worse in that respect. Why not just use a  notehead as a triangle pointed up as a sharpened note and pointed down as a flatted note? Because it's easier to read sharps and flats when the sign is a different symbol in a close but different spot than the notehead itself which already has to indicate staff position and duration.
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Andrew Meronek

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« Reply #89 on: Sep 09, 2016, 03:44AM »

I've still been picking up little tidbits here and there . . . this time:

https://xenharmonic.wikispaces.com/harmonic+entropy

Harmonic entropy is pretty interesting stuff. Compare the graph examples given to what you hear when you do a glissando against a drone, paying attention to where the intervals becomes more and less dissonant. Pretty similar. I believe it's a good practical connection between how harmony works psychoacoustically and with standard musical practices. There be good reasons why we choose temperaments that get pretty close to just intervals even when a temperament isn't "perfect".
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