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Author Topic: Looking For A Good Jazz Trombone  (Read 29360 times)
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Silver3B

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« Reply #20 on: Apr 16, 2008, 09:06PM »

There's always a Bolero...
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Anthony Cecena,
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Basscleff Barrister
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« Reply #21 on: Apr 16, 2008, 09:07PM »

I'm surprised that no one has mentioned the Getzen 3508 Custon Series. Dual bore: .500/.508. Interchangeable leadpipes with 3 included. These are said to be mainly Edwards horns in a stock configuration. I have one and find it to be a very well made and free blowing horn.
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Chris Fidler

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« Reply #22 on: Apr 17, 2008, 01:32AM »

Who's your favorite Jazz trombonist???

Check out what they play!!!!!
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Rob Dorsey

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« Reply #23 on: Apr 17, 2008, 05:40AM »

Favorite, you say? Shirley you jest!  Idea! Anyone of any age and experience knows full well, JJ Rules.

Each truly great musician must display a genius. Glenn Miller put the saxes up front and wrote them into the lead. Dorsey took his single trombone - an instrument often considered for accompaniment only - to the front of the band and featured it. Bird invented bebop and died trying to make it popular. Other woodwinds and even valve horns found the abrupt syncopation of bebop could fit on their instrument but they took their lead from Bird. I always figured that sax players did all those wild scales and runs for the same reason that dogs lick their jewels: because they can. But JJ took the trombone, an instrument everybody thought was left behind by modern jazz, into that frantic style and made it sing.

There are many fine players who get all over the axe but JJ made the trombone an integral and important part of jazz after 1950. We were not just for dixieland anymore. He took us out of the tailgate and onto the jazz club stage. He, therefore, gets my vote, and my thanks.

For many years, he played the King 3B "Silversonic".

Thus endeth the rant,

RD
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dougm
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« Reply #24 on: Apr 17, 2008, 06:35AM »

Martin:
Urbie Green model - Fine choice for lead and jazz playing, but could be a little hard to handle.

Can you expand on this statement a little?  Someone brought in one of these horns this week to ask me what it was.  I've never seen one in person before.

Doug
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Chris Fidler

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« Reply #25 on: Apr 17, 2008, 06:52AM »

Favorite, you say? Shirley you jest!  Idea! Anyone of any age and experience knows full well, JJ Rules.


Thus endeth the rant,

RD

Then it be a King 3B for you B...........BopMAN........ ;-)

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« Reply #26 on: Apr 17, 2008, 06:59AM »

Right. Got me a 3B Silversonic on order ah'do. Less than a month to go.  ;-)

Cheers or Schuß as appropriate to location,
RD
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Koz
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« Reply #27 on: Apr 17, 2008, 08:26AM »


For many years, he played the King 3B "Silversonic".
RD

Sorry.

Bad information.

JJ played a standard King 3B. (brass bell)
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DaveAshley

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« Reply #28 on: Apr 17, 2008, 08:45AM »

Sorry.

Bad information.

JJ played a standard King 3B. (brass bell)

Not completely bad information, though I wouldn't say he played it for many years, and probably not in his busiest recording years.
http://www.helmutkrebs.net/musik/JJDiscography/frontman/JJDiscogr_html_m38e4151f.jpg

((It's hard to tell in this particular picture, but it's definitely an HN White-era SilverSonic. The cover on my CD is much clearer))
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dj kennedy

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« Reply #29 on: Apr 17, 2008, 09:00AM »

the dudes   first  post  on this sub  was  feb  9th
 wondering if he  dug up  a  bone  yet 
 Yeah, RIGHT. Yeah, RIGHT. Yeah, RIGHT. Yeah, RIGHT.


I am a freshman in college and have a huge interest in jazz. Right now i use a Conn 88HO for wind ensemble/orchestra. So al of the classical stuff that isnt so demanding of range i use the concert horn for. Well in jazz i play lead and i use a King student model thats a few years old. I talked to my director about it and he said that a pro horn might help you in a lot of ways. I researched jazz horns and talked to them with my lesson teacher. Horns that i am mainly deciding on at the moment are the King 2B, Bach 16m (One that Bill Watrous uses I believe), and the Edwards jazz model. The Edwards seems a little overwhelming with all the options available, but it might be worth it. I am just curious if anyone can shed any light about which one of these horns is the best for lead playing and if theres a better model i would be happy to hear about that too.
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slidemansailor

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« Reply #30 on: Apr 17, 2008, 09:11AM »

Errrmmmm....

Are you *quite* sure you want to play in the extreme upper register?

I always think this cr..   sorry, stuff, should be left to the trumpets and saxes.

They have nothing better to do. Yeah, RIGHT.

Get yerself a King 3B and just play jazz!

One big, solid AMEN to that.  Trombones are instruments of the gods

until some tight-lipped trumpet player turns them into a slide trumpet.
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BGuttman
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« Reply #31 on: Apr 17, 2008, 10:03AM »

Can you expand on this statement a little?  Someone brought in one of these horns this week to ask me what it was.  I've never seen one in person before.

Doug

At one time Martin Band Instrument was a major maker of Pro horns; mostly in the 1930s to 1950s.  There were several instruments at various times that were good small bore jazz horns:

1.  Dansant.
2.  Committee.
3.  Urbie Green (who happened to be part of the Committee that designed the Committee).

There was a "Handkraft" that meant it was more carefully made.
There was an Imperial that was the Pro line before these and became the Intermediate during the reign of the Dansant and Committee.

All three are good substitutes for a Conn 6H or Bach 12 (in between the 2B and 3B).  Given the age of most Martin trombones (except for the Urbie, which was made into the 1990s while Martin became part of Holton) you may find the slides need a little work.

I had a Committee that played very well.  I sold it because I had too many horns of this ilk, and the Imperial I was using for Dixieland worked better for that use.
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slidemansailor

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« Reply #32 on: Apr 17, 2008, 10:35AM »

A friend who collects brass instruments laid out a spread of his playable trombones for me once. Most were old, heavy brass horns, but two of them opened my eyes to a world of trombones beyond my student Yamaha.  A Conn 88 straight horn and a Martin trigger made sounds I didn't think could happen powered by my breath.  He would not sell me either one.

That was the day my horizons expanded. That was the moment I really began my development as a trombonist... not that I got really far, but I sure am enjoying my sound a whole bunch with horns that suit me.

Oh yeah, there was a point to this...   The Martin ....
I had never heard of them before, yet this horn really sung.  It had a beautiful voice. On a shelf, I wouldn't have given it a glance. 

After playing, I WANTED IT... but it was my friend's only trigger horn. Today he has others, but now I have one and that's all the triggers I want.
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Turn off your TV. Make some beautiful music.

'06 Conn 88 HCL  .525/.547   5G
'58 Conn 6H   .500   6 1/2 AL
'74 Yamaha YSL354    .500   6 1/2 AL
'49 Harry Pedler American Triumph   Lyle 7

http://bitterrootbugle.com
http://teddunlap.net
Rob Dorsey

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« Reply #33 on: Apr 17, 2008, 11:07AM »

Oh, I do hope that this doesn't start a row but JJ did do a lot of playing on the 3B SS. King even made him one with a SS bell which was nitrited black and lacquered. The King logo was then re cut into the silver. It was a stunning axe as seen on one of JJs 60's albums "Goodies"



I think he ended his performing career on a Yamaha. His popularity in Japan was huge. The Japanese are into jazz and treat jazz greats like rock stars, or sumo stars, or baseball players - you get the picture.

Best,
RD
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Sanf

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« Reply #34 on: Apr 17, 2008, 12:36PM »

I was under the impression that J.J. played a 3b bell and 2b slide.
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Frank Ng
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« Reply #35 on: Apr 17, 2008, 01:31PM »

My friend and I determined that Urbie would have been just 12 years old when they started making Committee trombones. The name came from the trumpet which actually WAS a group effort with Foster Reynolds, Eldon Benge,Vincent Bach ,a forgotten Chicago Symphony member and Renold Shilke. Shilke would tell anyone in earshot that he was the main designer of the horn. When a trumpet came out under that name from Holton-Leblanc he approached Wallace Roney and said"Let me see what you've done to my trumpet." This came up about a year ago-that's why I looked up Urbies date of birth etc. Now the Holton-Leblanc made Martin Urbie Green certainly had a lot of input from the man whose name is on the horn.  :)They also had a Dave Steinmeyer model that was essentially the Urbie model with a half inch smaller bell. I played The Martin Urbie exclusively for about 6 years. Unfortunately I had two bad slide drops that rendered the horn unable to hold alignment. I gave it away to a promising player that was in a band that I called on in the fundraising business. That was after I got my 1980's 100H. So I had two horns in a row with the curved left hand brace.
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janettem
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« Reply #36 on: Apr 26, 2008, 04:28PM »

Just save that $$$ for a 3B!

That's what I'm doing!!! :D
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« Reply #37 on: Apr 28, 2008, 05:21PM »

another vote for the ysl-697z.... if you've heard one u know what i mean..... i actually have one on order, but my local dealer thinks mines coming form japan so i wont see it for a while :p
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« Reply #38 on: Apr 29, 2008, 10:27AM »

I think he ended his performing career on a Yamaha. His popularity in Japan was huge. The Japanese are into jazz and treat jazz greats like rock stars, or sumo stars, or baseball players - you get the picture.

Best,
RD

The story I heard (and honestly we'll never know for sure what happened), is that JJ had his main King break and requested a new one.  King was feeling pretty cheap and told him he had to buy one.  Around the same time JJ had a friend who was dealing with Yamaha who was just starting making trombones.  Yamaha sent JJ a whole bunch of trombones, knowing that if he didn't like them he would at least give them to his friends.  JJ then finished his career on Yamahas.  Certainly says a lot about service!

Also if Nick is still reading this, definitely give DJ a visit.  I thought for sure that when I moved from my concert large bore to a Jazz horn that a 3b would be right for me.  After playing several horns at his house I fell in love with a Yamaha 697Z.  Tiny Bore, but very open blowing and LOUD!
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« Reply #39 on: Apr 29, 2008, 10:52AM »

I fell in love with a Yamaha 697Z.  Tiny Bore, but very open blowing and LOUD!

I found the same. My primary was and is the Conn 88 in .525/.547 and I thought it was ringing and singing pretty well. My 697Z really barks, without rattling. In places where I want to punch the phrases out, I have to hold 'er back a skosh or I'll hurt somebody.  The Z is very expressive.
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Turn off your TV. Make some beautiful music.

'06 Conn 88 HCL  .525/.547   5G
'58 Conn 6H   .500   6 1/2 AL
'74 Yamaha YSL354    .500   6 1/2 AL
'49 Harry Pedler American Triumph   Lyle 7

http://bitterrootbugle.com
http://teddunlap.net
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