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The Trombone ForumPractice BreakFound on the 'Net(Moderators: RedHotMama, BFW) Conn-Elkhart-48H-Connstellation-Pro-Trombone
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zemry

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« on: Apr 21, 2008, 01:52AM »

http://cgi.ebay.com/Conn-Elkhart-48H-Connstellation-Pro-Trombone-Gorgeous_W0QQitemZ290222826073QQihZ019QQcategoryZ16216QQssPageNameZWDVWQQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem
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Richard Zemry Johnson, Jr.
Trav1s
.522" Conn Lover

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« Reply #1 on: Apr 21, 2008, 06:06AM »

<drool>
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Conn 77H - parade worthy
Conn 79H with a Rotax valve
Conn 80H - .522" bore & 8" red brass bell
Besson 8-10 that needs some TLC
greg waits

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« Reply #2 on: Apr 21, 2008, 07:04AM »

That's a beauty for sure!

I owned a nice Connstellation back when I was 19 (damn, that was a long time ago  :cry:)

I had a private lesson with Bill Watrous. When I took my horn out of the case, Bill said "The first thing you should do is get rid of that piece of sh*t!"

Oddly enough I wasn't offended. Then I went out and found a used Bach 12 and played it for 20 years.

Sorry to hijack the thread!
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zemry

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« Reply #3 on: Apr 21, 2008, 07:06AM »

I own a 1958 Conn Connstellation. It has the slide and valve section. It is a beautiful horn with a beautiful sound!
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Bob Riddle

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« Reply #4 on: Apr 21, 2008, 07:28PM »

I personally think the 48H Connstellations are extremely underrated as to their quality,sound,ease of playing and versatility.I'm beginning to believe that these might have been overlooked in the past.Might just be the best .500 horn Conn ever made.I've played lots of 6H's and none even come close to the Connstellation in terms of finesse,resonance,evenness throughout the entire range of the horn.Can be very warm/dark in tone or clear/brilliant when needed,depending on how you approach them.
VHY
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Bonedaddy

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« Reply #5 on: Apr 25, 2008, 09:33PM »

Wow, that's a beautiful horn.  I love the way those things look.  I owned a vintage Elkhart model for a short while that was just inspiring to look upon, but man did I hate the way it played.  I've never tried a tighter-feeling horn.  It had a really nice sound to it, but it wasn't for me because it was just too restrictive.  I have 3 6H's and a 10H, and I prefer all of them to the 48H I had.  I've played a few others too, but have never found one that knocked me out.  I'm sure they are out there.  I wish I could have played that 48H, because it was probably the coolestlooking horn I've ever owned (although my 10H is pretty darn cool as well.)

Ben Patterson
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zemry

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« Reply #6 on: Apr 27, 2008, 07:46PM »

Sold!!! $1,226.00
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There won't come a time when you won't have to practice anymore.........J.J. Johnson

Richard Zemry Johnson, Jr.
greg waits

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« Reply #7 on: Apr 27, 2008, 08:43PM »

I personally think the 48H Connstellations are extremely underrated as to their quality,sound,ease of playing and versatility....

Conn marketed them as the top of their line .500 bore horns, but I think history proves that most players chose the 6H instead. That could be a result of a lot of different factors. (price, how well Conn promoted the horns, etc)

When you consider all the pros that played Conns, I can't think of any off hand that did play Connstellations. Look at the old ads from the day. For instance, the one that shows Kenton's entire trombone section playing Conns. (Bobby Burgess, Frank Rosolino and Keith Moon on 6H and George Roberts playing a 62H)

I am sure that there are great playing examples of the Connstellation, but the one I owned didn't make a particularly strong impression on me. Then again, that was a long time ago.  :/
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ctingle

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« Reply #8 on: Apr 28, 2008, 07:49AM »

As much as I like my 48h that I use as a backup to my 6h, this thread and ebay price have me thinking of parting with it.  Amazed
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Chip Tingle
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Hobone

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« Reply #9 on: Aug 25, 2010, 09:20AM »

In response to Greg's comments, I belive that Nat Peck played the 48H virtually throughout his career.
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sabutin

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« Reply #10 on: Aug 26, 2010, 06:26AM »

I believe that when he Connstellations were being made, they were just a little too...aggressive sounding...for the way most pros played. Nickel silver will do that. It emphasizes the higher overtones at a slightly lower volume than regular brass or any other platings.

Now?

We need all he help we can get to deal with amped-up rhythm sections, steroidal brass players and bad miking.

They were ahead of their time.

Or...our time is regressive.

Hmmmmmm...

S.
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Visit <http://samburtis.com/>. Lots of information on that site in the form of articles plus a link to my method book "Time, Balance & Connections-A Universal Theory Of Brass Relativity" which includes several chapters of the book.
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« Reply #11 on: Aug 26, 2010, 02:51PM »

I believe that when he Connstellations were being made, they were just a little too...aggressive sounding...for the way most pros played. Nickel silver will do that. It emphasizes the higher overtones at a slightly lower volume than regular brass or any other platings.

S.

I agree. The other thing about a Connstellation is it is almost impossible to get it to blare /break up. It was why I bought a used one in the 70s when I was playing euphonium and bass bone. I could easily overblow a 6H. I will say embouchure was more flabby than it is today; I would have more success with a 6H now.

I still have it in case I get asked to play on a parade float or a ska band. I'm expecting that's a big "in case".

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Martin Hubel
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ctingle

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« Reply #12 on: Aug 26, 2010, 10:28PM »

I haven't pulled mine out in some time, probably because I haven't been playing as many salsa gigs.  But I played a salsa/latin jazz hit last Sunday that made me think of my powerful 48H.  If I could get as much tonal variety and flexibility as my 6H offers, I'd play it all the time.
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Chip Tingle
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« Reply #13 on: Sep 06, 2010, 04:41AM »

Just picked up a 1957 48H with lightweight slide recently restored by Conn and not played since. I wasn't looking for a new horn and generally prefer larger bores, but this is a definite WOW! The slide is the fastest I've ever encountered. Feels like there is nothing there. The sound is also superb - seems to be able to cut through just about anything yet still dark enough for me.

The back story is a bit sad. This was owned by a friend of mine, Al Barthlow (Dukes of Dixieland, '90-'94). This horn was his absolute pride and joy. He talked about it endlessly, but said he just couldn't bring himself to play it once it was restored. Al died several months ago at 79. I have since found out that he wanted to be buried with this horn - literally.  His kids didn't know that and they didn't put the horn in the casket with him. They later sold all of his horns to a local tech and I stumbled on it when I took one of mine for some minor work. This is thing is as perfect as the day it was made. While it should have gone with Al, since it didn't, far better that it gets played and played by someone who knew and respected the original owner. It is one very fine instrument with some incredible juice.
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Torobone

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« Reply #14 on: Sep 06, 2010, 07:58AM »

My 65 Connstellation has a similar story. I picked it up used in '75 at Long & McQuade in Toronto. It was in sorry shape, with numerous dents in the inner and outer slides, and the tuning slide. There was considerable acid wear from the original owner. It had obviously played a lot.

I sat beside Ted Robbins one day, another Connstellation player and euphonium virtuoso, and we discussed our horns. Based on the timing of my purchase, he said it was probably the trombone used by a fellow who played a regular trio gig at the Royal York Hotel here in town. The guy had past away, so it was probably placed on consignment by his widow. Ted mentioned his name, but it quickly escaped me. Maybe somebody else on the forum would remember his name. Ted Robbins past away himself a few years back.
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Martin Hubel
Yamaha 891Z & 830 Xeno Bass, & '74 Bach 42 (played regularly)
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