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Author Topic: Christan Griego shows you how to clean a slide  (Read 30932 times)
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BillO
A trombone is not measured by it's name.

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« Reply #40 on: Oct 17, 2015, 02:00PM »

I use alcohol too.  Usually a shot-glass full of single malt to sip while I get to cleaning my slide. Good!

For that, I use a method very similar to Christian's, except I use a 1/4" wooden dowel with a nice rounded tip on it instead of the metal rod.  I also use 'J'-cloths instead of the cheese cloth.  Very similar fabric and they cost me nothing.  My wife buys them for cleaning purposes.  Evil  But I like the medical gauze idea.  I usually do a full cleaning once a month or more frequently if the slide gets sluggish.  I do an inner slide wipe down before each lubrication.

For lubricant, I have just about everything (coldcream, SuperSlick (old and new), Trombotine, SoM, SoM Comfort) and I switch back and forth with them from time to time between cleanings.  They all work great, but I have used something better (more on that later).  I have never had a problem with any build-up of any kind.

As for the best lubricant ever?  Well, back in school I used to use a Johnson product called Clean 'n' Shine on the advice of our band director to clean our instruments.  I once tried it on the slide, and wow!  Insanely good!  A tiny spritz would last for about 20 hours of playing (about a week or so back then).  Although a tiny amount was all you needed, it was almost impossible to put too much on.  Unfortunately Johnson stopped making it back in the early '90s. So sad.
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« Reply #41 on: Nov 05, 2015, 03:49PM »

Best way I have found to clean my slide is to soak it in lukewarm water. I put a towel in the bottom of the tub and run my water about a 1/2 in over the slide so it's submerged and let it fill up with water. Then I let is soak about 15 minutes. Then I take my snake and while it's still underwater and run the snake through it a few times until it's clean. then I wash the inner slide with a mild dish detergent (I use Palmolive) to remove any excess oil build up. Then I rinse it off and set it out to dry. Then I just put some new slide cream on it and it's as smooth as new.
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bigbandaxes
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« Reply #42 on: Dec 27, 2017, 05:21AM »

New to this dicussion. What surprised me about Christan's video was that he didn't address the inside of the inner slide tubes and the inside od the crook! That's where all the beer and pretzels end up! Also where the red rot starts! You would be surprised at what comes out! The first thing I do every week is put a "spit ball" through the assembled slide section. Several times! Then I proceed pretty much as in his video.
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Short slided Conn 20H with King hand slide crook
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« Reply #43 on: Dec 27, 2017, 06:19AM »

New to this dicussion. What surprised me about Christan's video was that he didn't address the inside of the inner slide tubes and the inside od the crook! That's where all the beer and pretzels end up! Also where the red rot starts! You would be surprised at what comes out! The first thing I do every week is put a "spit ball" through the assembled slide section. Several times! Then I proceed pretty much as in his video.
A quick blast with a garden hose works well too!
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Eric, Leandra, Sara, Jared & Lily
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« Reply #44 on: Dec 27, 2017, 08:46AM »

New to this dicussion. What surprised me about Christan's video was that he didn't address the inside of the inner slide tubes and the inside od the crook! That's where all the beer and pretzels end up! Also where the red rot starts! You would be surprised at what comes out! The first thing I do every week is put a "spit ball" through the assembled slide section. Several times! Then I proceed pretty much as in his video.

You can just use some dish soap and one of those snake brushes. To rinse, you just need a funnel.
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Edwards Tenor
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billepstein

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« Reply #45 on: Feb 03, 2018, 04:13PM »

I've always had the impression you should only lube the stockings..........I'm looking forward to trying Christian's advice to lube the entire inner slide.

And I've always used lighter fluid to clean the outer slide and the inside and outside of the inner slide, because it's a solvent and dissolves all kinds of lubricating products, not to mention the crud that gets inside the inner slide.  Glass cleaner seems worth a try, but I've been very happy with the results of lighter fluid.  Must admit I've never seen anyone else use it!

I'm a bit puzzled that the video doesn't address cleaning the inside of the inner slide. I don't think dry cloth would cut it.

Never tried lighter fluid, not a fan of solvents on soft metals like brass. If lighter fluid seems appropriate, I would counsel using VM&P Naptha from the paint store. Lighter fluid is Naptha but VM&P (varnish makers and painters) is filtered of contaminants. It's the choice of conservators at the Smithsonian to safely clean the crud of time from antique wooden furniture.

Several years ago I had the privilege of visiting The Slide Doctor and watched him spend several hours vigorously burnishing the inners of the outer slide with brass polish using an ordinary cleaning rod and white cotton muslin wrapped around the rod. Frequent rinsings as the work progressed. With the slide crook removed I was able to see the glistening inners and the final result, a slide that just wanted to escape to the Moon.

That is my method ever since. The burnishing and Super Slick cream and oil make poor slides free and easy. https://youtu.be/uMrUxLKMRQ8
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timothy42b
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« Reply #46 on: Feb 03, 2018, 04:56PM »

I watched that video with John Upchurch.

What was the little bottle he put on after the Superslick? 
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Tim Richardson
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« Reply #47 on: Feb 03, 2018, 05:09PM »

Superslick sells a silicone drop that can be used to make SuperSlick work "better".  The small bottle of Slide-O-Mix does about the same thing.  Also works on Trombotine and cold cream.
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Bruce Guttman
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« Reply #48 on: Feb 04, 2018, 05:19AM »

Superslick sells a silicone drop that can be used to make SuperSlick work "better".  The small bottle of Slide-O-Mix does about the same thing.  Also works on Trombotine and cold cream.

Super Slick markets a 3 piece kit: cream, silicone oil, and a water sprayer for $5 bucks. I got mine at Amazon, but like my ex-wife, at fine stores everywhere.
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