Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length

 
Advanced search

950754 Posts in 62899 Topics- by 15211 Members - Latest Member: thetromboneyguy
Jump to:  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
Print
Author Topic: Glenn Miller Band Trombonists  (Read 1659 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
BGuttman
Mad Chemist

*
*
Offline Offline

Location: Londonderry, NH, USA
Joined: Dec 12, 2000
Posts: 42635
"Almost Professional"


View Profile
« on: May 11, 2009, 01:07PM »

I was reminded of the great trombone section of the Glenn Miller Band when I was posting the announcement of our downtime on Facebook and it brought a question to my mind.

The section consisted of Glenn Miller, Frank D'Annolfo, Jimmy Priddy, and Paul Tanner.  Miller talks in his Arranging book about how he used to rotate the lead part amongst his trumpet players.  Who amongst Miller's trombone players played what part?  Or did all 4 switch around like the trumpets?

Probably the only person left who could answer that question is Paul Tanner.  If you are out there, Dr. Tanner, could you weigh in?
Logged

Bruce Guttman
Solo Trombone, Hollis Town Band
Section Ldr, Merrimack Valley Philharmonic Orch.
John S. Lipton
« Reply #1 on: May 11, 2009, 01:08PM »

I was reminded of the great trombone section of the Glenn Miller Band when I was posting the announcement of our downtime on Facebook and it brought a question to my mind.

The section consisted of Glenn Miller, Frank D'Annolfo, Jimmy Priddy, and Paul Tanner.  Miller talks in his Arranging book about how he used to rotate the lead part amongst his trumpet players.  Who amongst Miller's trombone players played what part?  Or did all 4 switch around like the trumpets?

Probably the only person left who could answer that question is Paul Tanner.  If you are out there, Dr. Tanner, could you weigh in?

I know Glenn Miller played the 4th part for what it is worth.
Logged
DaveAshley

*
Offline Offline

Location: Lexington, Kentucky
Joined: Jun 14, 2005
Posts: 2409

View Profile
« Reply #2 on: May 11, 2009, 01:11PM »

Tanner wrote a book called "Sideman" about his time with the GMO.  I don't remember if he mentions such a thing, but I do know that Glenn played some 1st trombone parts.  There were a few charts in the current GMO book that are ORIGINAL and at least one 1st trombone part ("Shoo Shoo Baby" I think) had his count-off written in along with a few performance notes.
Logged

BGuttman
Mad Chemist

*
*
Offline Offline

Location: Londonderry, NH, USA
Joined: Dec 12, 2000
Posts: 42635
"Almost Professional"


View Profile
« Reply #3 on: May 11, 2009, 01:16PM »

I remember getting a Miller Band arrangement where the 4th part was clearly written above everybody else and was probably Glenn's (and they handed it to me, the bass trombonist).

The way the AAF band worked may have been different from the civilian band; I don't think too many of the Miller Band joined up.
Logged

Bruce Guttman
Solo Trombone, Hollis Town Band
Section Ldr, Merrimack Valley Philharmonic Orch.
john sandhagen
curmudgeon... semitrained
*
*
Offline Offline

Location: claremont, ca, usa
Joined: Jul 31, 2000
Posts: 6503

View Profile
« Reply #4 on: May 11, 2009, 01:44PM »

Dave, tell us more about the "original" charts.  Copies of copies?  I had understood that the ENTIRE book went down with his plane.

Most of the charts we are familiar with were transcriptions...written at the time of stocks...so the most important part was first, not necessarilly the highest...then second then third.  Often the 4th was marked optional, even though the Miller Band carried 4 trombones for most of it's life.

I remember reading a biography of Miller where it said he liked playing the lower parts...I'm sure he had some solos and mostly was harder on himself as a trombonist than anyone else was...I had thought that had he survived the war he might have switched to bass trombone...

Logged

John Sandhagen,
the Boneyard

"What can be asserted without evidence can also be dismissed without evidence."
Joe Jackson

*
*
Offline Offline

Location: Davidsonville, MD
Joined: Jul 26, 2002
Posts: 3416

View Profile WWW
« Reply #5 on: May 11, 2009, 05:06PM »

Good thread, anything Miller usually gets dissed by pro musicians but that band could play.


Oh, and flame away but in my estimation Glenn miller was an underrated soloist.  Check out Pagan Love song and Drum Boogie.
Logged

Bellend

*
Offline Offline

Location: U.K.
Joined: Nov 25, 2001
Posts: 498

View Profile
« Reply #6 on: May 11, 2009, 05:14PM »

Dave, tell us more about the "original" charts.  Copies of copies?  I had understood that the ENTIRE book went down with his plane.


Are you sure that's not just wishful thinking on your part John  :D  :D  :D  :D



Some 20+ years ago I was the lead trombonist of the Glenn Miller Orchestra UK Ltd and during that time was lucky enough to tour with three members of the original band.

Apologies if the spelling is wrong it was a long time ago, Zeke Zarchy Tpt, Willie Scwartz Clr, and Jimmy Priddy tbn.

I distinctly remember Jimmy telling me that in the civilian band Glenn played most of the leads as he said when they all enlisted to form AEF Band Jimmy had to take over the lead book.  Jimmy was at pains to say that Glenn Miller was a much better player than people give him credit for, as for what he was like as a person, he never really said. :/


Jimmy him self was a great guy, full of funny storeys and always up for a laugh. After a few nights I couldn't help but  notice that he had two spray bottles on stage with him and he would occasionally  spray them in to his mouth alternately. On asking what was in them the reply came ones vodka, the others vermouth  :D

Another night on the bus Willie Scwatrz told us he's had a call from a crazy guy who'd been to Twinwoods, the airfield that Millers final flight left from. The guy proceeded to tell Willie he had the last piece of grass that Glenn ever stood on and wanted some advice as to what to do with it. Willie's reply.............. SMOKE IT   :D  :D  :D  Evil  

Bearing that all these guys must have been in their seventies they were still playing pretty well and over the course of tour as Jimmy and Zeke's chops got more and more in you could hear what fantastic players they must have been in their prime, Willie Scwartz's clarinet sound litterally made the hairs on the back of my neck stand up when he played Moonlight Serenade, and believe me when I tell you that is NOT one of my favourite tunes  Evil



Zeke:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZQKbffBqJv8


BellEnd



Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
Print
Jump to: