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Author Topic: The Serocki and Program Notes  (Read 2461 times)
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Lunarman
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« on: Jul 17, 2009, 12:12PM »

Hi,
 
I'm an avid trombone player and have been for 8 years now. I'm about to take my ABRSM diploma and I have to write program notes.
The pieces I'm playing are the David, the Guilmant and the infamous Sonatina for Trombone and Piano by Serocki.
 
The problem I'm having is that I've found nothing on the history of the Serocki. Short biographies on the composer can be found around the web but I'm really after a history of the piece itself, who was it written for? Under what circumstances was it compose? Has Serocki ever said anything about it?
 
I don't own a CD of the piece myself so I can't check if there are any notes inside the case leaflet.
 
Can anyone enlighten me further?
 
Thankyou
 
Lunarman
 
p.s. Anything you know about the David or the Morceau Symphonique would be much welcome too, although they turn up more on google and wikipedia.
Thanks again

p.p.s I hope this is the right forum, sorry if it isn't
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BGuttman
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« Reply #1 on: Jul 17, 2009, 01:06PM »

This definitely doesn't belong in Practice Room.  You are collecting notes about a piece of music for a Performance.

I'm going to move this to Music, Concerts, and Recordings and hope you'll get better response there.

Hold tight...
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Bruce Guttman
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djdekok

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« Reply #2 on: Jul 18, 2009, 04:16AM »

Ferdinand David was a student of Felix Mendelssohn and it is posited that Mendelssohn was the original recipient of the commission for this piece.  He subsequently handed it off to Mr. David--and the rest is history--but to me it definitely has Mendelssohn's influence.

As for the Guilmant, Felix Alexander Guilmant is best known in the music world for his contributions to organ literature(are you doing MS with organ or piano?).  He was the chief organist at Trinite` church in Paris for over 25 years, after which he spent the remainder of his life concertizing in Europe and the US, as well as composing.
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Daniel De Kok
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« Reply #3 on: Jul 18, 2009, 04:53AM »

serocki's sonatina was originally for trombone and piano, but the composer later orchestrated it for symphonic orchestra himself. i have a recording of the symphonic version, it is pretty cool orchestration.

also, i have heard that serocki was originally a boxer, and became an autodidact composer, but his wikipedia site doesn't say anything about it so i guess it is an "urban legend". http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kazimierz_Serocki
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Tim Dowling

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« Reply #4 on: Jul 18, 2009, 05:02AM »

serocki's sonatina was originally for trombone and piano, but the composer later orchestrated it for symphonic orchestra himself. i have a recording of the symphonic version, it is pretty cool orchestration.



There is a Concerto from 1953 for trb and orchestra, as well as the Sonatina from 1954. I didn't know of an orchestral version of the Sonatina. Both these pieces and the Suite for 4 trombones were written for the Polish trombone virtuoso Juliusz Pietrachowicz, who was at the time principal trombonist of the Warsaw Philharmonic.
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Tim Dowling
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« Reply #5 on: Jul 18, 2009, 05:08AM »

i know there's a concerto too, but there IS a version of the sonatina for symphony orchestra :) hickeys has the score...
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Jeff Smith
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« Reply #6 on: Jul 18, 2009, 05:43AM »

David was also Mendelssohn's concertmaster, performing frequently in the Gewandhaus Leipzig.
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Lunarman
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« Reply #7 on: Jul 18, 2009, 12:58PM »

There is a Concerto from 1953 for trb and orchestra, as well as the Sonatina from 1954. I didn't know of an orchestral version of the Sonatina. Both these pieces and the Suite for 4 trombones were written for the Polish trombone virtuoso Juliusz Pietrachowicz, who was at the time principal trombonist of the Warsaw Philharmonic.

Golden, thanks!
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HowardW
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« Reply #8 on: Jul 19, 2009, 06:04AM »

Ferdinand David was a student of Felix Mendelssohn and it is posited that Mendelssohn was the original recipient of the commission for this piece.  He subsequently handed it off to Mr. David--and the rest is history--but to me it definitely has Mendelssohn's influence.

Ferdinand David was NOT a student of Felix Mendelssohn, but rather a close friend of his from childhood -- they were born within a year of each other in Hamburg.

David wrote the Concertino op. 4 for Carl Traugott Queisser, who besides being one of the greatest trombone soloists of the first half of the 19th century, was principal violist of Leipzig's Gewandhaus Orchestra and violist of the Gewandhaus String Quartet, of which David was first violinist. David was also godfather to one of Queisser's sons. So it was hardly necessary for Mendelssohn to act as an intermediary between Queisser and David.

More about Queissser and David's Concertino can be found in the article by Sebastian Krause, "Der Posaunengott" / "God of the Trombone," Brass Bulletin 117 (2002), pp. 68-80.

Howard
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"If you want to become phthisis-proof, drink-proof, cholera-proof, and in short, immortal, play the trombone well and play it constantly." -- George Bernard Shaw
Lunarman
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« Reply #9 on: Jul 21, 2009, 12:02AM »

After searching various libraries in London I'm off to the British Library today to view an academic document on the work. Which, according to the British Library, is the only piece ever written about it. So I'll post the results here to aid future program note writers.
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