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The Trombone ForumTeaching & LearningComposition, Arranging and Theory(Moderators: zemry, Thomas Matta) Transposing G Treble Clef to Bb Bass Clef
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not2old2play

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« on: Feb 04, 2010, 07:29AM »

OK - so this is a little weird. Our drum and bugle corps is composed of G horns - they all play in treble clef. I play a Yamaha Bb marching baritone and I'm trying to transpose the music from a written treble clef to bass clef, and from G to Bb.

Of course the first problem was to figure out what comes out of the big end of the G horn - a written C actually comes out of the horn as a G, etc. OK, so then all I have to do is play a valve 1 & 2 G on my baritone and it should produce the same sound as a written C on a G horn, right? - TADA - it does. Good! Of course nothing is that simple.

Without getting into structures and minor thirds that I really don't understand, it appears that the key signature for the written music needs to change when I try to transpose the notes. For example, a written treble clef key of C appears to be transposed to a bass clef key of G, a treble clef key of Ab appears to be transposed to a bass clef key of Eb, etc. - it looks like I gain one sharp (or lose one flat) in the transposition. Do I have any idea what I'm talking about!!??
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BGuttman
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« Reply #1 on: Feb 04, 2010, 07:44AM »

If you were playing music for a valveless G bugle, you could simply put down valves 1 and 2 and go.

But modern Corps music is written for a 2 or 3 valved instrument so it's chromatic.

You can read the part in Baritone Clef: the F symbol is on the middle line (or the movable C symbol is on the top line).  The note 1 ledger line down (written C) will come out as G:  (converted into bass clef).

I'm not sure, but I think you would add one sharp to the key signature since you are going from a transposed G instrument into C (bass clef).
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Bruce Guttman
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WaltTrombone
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« Reply #2 on: Feb 04, 2010, 08:23AM »

Yup, add one sharp, or take away one flat.
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Walter Barrett
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not2old2play

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« Reply #3 on: Feb 04, 2010, 05:51PM »

HAPPY DANCE!!

I was right!! I thought I had figured it out.

The easiest way to translate the written treble clef music, for me, is to move the written note up one space or line (space to space or line to line) from where it was written for a C horn and change the clef sign.

All this explains why I have F# issues for a piece written in C!!

Happy dance some more!!

Bruce and Walt - much thanks!
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