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Author Topic: Leopold Mozart trombone "concerto"  (Read 13690 times)
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HowardW
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« Reply #20 on: Apr 07, 2010, 01:14AM »

Howard, hats off!  You know what you're talking about!  But as far as the quote you have about the alto sounding shrill...There are just as many quotes where people say it was excellent!
I did not introduce the quote about the alto trombone sounding shrill. In any case, a quote that I find more to the point is that from Praetorius: "although the sound in such a small corpus is not as good as when the tenor trombone, with a good embouchure and practice, is played in this high register."

And the many quotes of people saying the alto is excellent are hardly historical, i.e., they're from the 20th century or the late 19th century at most.

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And it was a couple years ago that I read the article.  Here's the main alto trombone page I was talking about:

http://www.pittstate.edu/department/music/kehle/alto-trombone.dot

It is possible that it could have been this page that I read it on, and has since been removed or reduced to just the abstract.
Can't be. The full article was never available there, only the abstract that I submitted to Bob Kehle for his "Alto Trombone Research Abstracts." I'm fairly sure that Bob doesn't agree with my findings, but he was gracious enough to post my abstract on his site.

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It was also available on the British Trombone Society page for at least a time...I don't know I definately have read this article and thought it was good!
I have no knowledge of it ever being on the British Trombone Society page.

Howard
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"If you want to become phthisis-proof, drink-proof, cholera-proof, and in short, immortal, play the trombone well and play it constantly." -- George Bernard Shaw
R.Lo

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« Reply #21 on: Sep 19, 2014, 11:08AM »

Would anyone recommend a good transcription or arrangement of this work for tenor trombone? Which publishing company or sheet music distributor that would have the most accurate representation of this work?

This has been an awesome conversation, thanks.

Ritchie
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BGuttman
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« Reply #22 on: Sep 19, 2014, 12:59PM »

Would anyone recommend a good transcription or arrangement of this work for tenor trombone? Which publishing company or sheet music distributor that would have the most accurate representation of this work?

This has been an awesome conversation, thanks.

Ritchie

There is no reason you couldn't play this on a tenor trombone (except if you can't read alto clef).
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Bruce Guttman
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R.Lo

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« Reply #23 on: Sep 21, 2014, 09:01PM »

Which/who's transcription is best and what are your opinions about the cadenza? Make up one?
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Cappelgren
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« Reply #24 on: Jan 09, 2018, 11:02AM »

Hi!
I read that the serenade was discovered in the 1960s. Do you by any chance know who discovered it and where it was found?
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robcat2075

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« Reply #25 on: Jan 09, 2018, 03:53PM »


Leopold Mozart himself wrote on the manuscript of the serenade: "In the absence of a good trombonist, a good violinist can play it on the viola."


But don't ask a viola player!
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Robert Holmén

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