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The Trombone ForumHorns, Gear, and EquipmentAccessories(Moderator: WaltTrombone) wallace compact and studio practice mute
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fkin
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« on: May 03, 2010, 07:40AM »

hi,

i am still in the process of searching for bass , alto and baritone mute, did
anyone try one of the practice mute, both studio and compact model?

http://www.wallacebrass.co.uk/BassTromboneMutes.htm

http://www.wallacebrass.co.uk/TenorTrombone.htm

any opinions are welcome!

thx

Kin
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« Reply #1 on: May 03, 2010, 08:06AM »

Blast helped design them
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« Reply #2 on: May 03, 2010, 08:24AM »

Hi,

I have the compact practice mut since four weeks now.
I am really impressed with the easy and nearly resistance free playing.
I also have the copper-bottom straight mute and the cup mute. These two also are awesome to play.

Greetings

Maik

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« Reply #3 on: May 03, 2010, 08:55AM »

I have the Compact version. I find it plays "better" than the Best Brass. I still think the Bremner mute is the "best" playing of the bunch but it doesn't fit flush with the bell (which is what I needed for travel). The Wallace Compact is close in playability to the Bremner.
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« Reply #4 on: May 03, 2010, 12:25PM »

hi,

i am still in the process of searching for bass , alto and baritone mute, did
anyone try one of the practice mute, both studio and compact model?

http://www.wallacebrass.co.uk/BassTromboneMutes.htm

http://www.wallacebrass.co.uk/TenorTrombone.htm

any opinions are welcome!

thx

Kin

I may be a bit biased as I helped to develop them. They are not my designs in any way.. I just did the testing... and boy, was there a lot of that. We really wanted the mutes to be better than any of those that we had tried and it took a long time to get there. The mute that fits within the bell was the hardest as a whole new internal structure had to be made to hold the pitch true.
Both mutes work very well, though the studio is the better blow, and with the resistor removed, it can be used(and has been in the BBC Symphony Orchestra) as a very quiet straight mute.
Like any mute, there may be fit issues with odd bell shapes... we checked them with all the normally used stuff.
I think they are great products, but in the end it's a question of personal taste.

Chris Stearn
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Don Draper
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« Reply #5 on: May 04, 2010, 09:09AM »

Is there an American distributor?  Love to have one of the practice mutes...
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rommer
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« Reply #6 on: May 06, 2010, 10:03PM »

I found it listed at Hinckley's.  Does anyone know of another source in the United States? 
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Richard Tadaki

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« Reply #7 on: May 07, 2010, 12:49AM »


That's Hickey's at hickeys.com.   Clever

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NYTrombonist
« Reply #8 on: May 07, 2010, 05:49AM »

slidebone.com

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cyberdybner

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« Reply #9 on: May 07, 2010, 07:35AM »

The studio mute has really exceeded my expectations, it is very quiet and has a much lower resistance than the Joral practice mute I used before.
Finally I have found a practice mute that feels OK to play!

But still, I have to be careful not to use it too much. After all, there is a big difference in resistance compared to the open horn.
For me, practicing a lot with a practice mute can have bad effects, especially on low tones.

/Erik





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GetzenBassPlayer

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« Reply #10 on: May 07, 2010, 07:46AM »


For me, practicing a lot with a practice mute can have bad effects, especially on low tones.

/Erik
 Interesting. I have found the opposite effect. I have found that practice mute playing has increased my focus in all registers. The resistance has helped increase strength in the embouchure and breathing system. I use mine when doing long tones, double pedal tones and flexibility slurs.





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« Reply #11 on: May 07, 2010, 10:05AM »


For me, practicing a lot with a practice mute can have bad effects, especially on low tones.

/Erik







Example?
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« Reply #12 on: May 07, 2010, 01:30PM »

Well, I will give it a try,  it is difficult to diagnose yourself.

 But I am noticing that when I have only been able to practice with the mute for some time, there is a tendency for notes between and  to be less full in sound. I also notice that it can affect my soft playing, making it difficult to play really soft.

And while it is really easy to play low pedals with a mute, when you play without it, you need to provide much more resistance in the lips for the notes to speak.

Maybe the lips get used to relying on the resistance of the mute and are not providing enough resistance by themselves.

Of course this might be a result of me overblowing when using the mute, it is really easy to do.

Anyway, sadly for me it is a really bad idea to practice too much with a mute, many times it would have been better to rest the lips instead.

/Erik   


 
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GetzenBassPlayer

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« Reply #13 on: May 07, 2010, 08:54PM »

Part of my renewed interest in working with using a practice mute is Gabe had mentioned Charlie Vernon had been using a practice mute as part of his practicing more consistently lately. I still use good form when playing in a mute. My view is that it is like walking up hill vs. on the flats; much easier to keep the heart rate up where it needs to be.
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Pro level? Pro level!  You make it pro, you make it good You make it loved and play nice Then its a pro level horn
Leif

I can justify my position with a trombone in my hands and that's good enough for me
Beware wise men bearing equations  C. Stearn
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« Reply #14 on: May 08, 2010, 08:23AM »

Part of my renewed interest in working with using a practice mute is Gabe had mentioned Charlie Vernon had been using a practice mute as part of his practicing more consistently lately. I still use good form when playing in a mute. My view is that it is like walking up hill vs. on the flats; much easier to keep the heart rate up where it needs to be.

I think that is Denis Wick's view as well.

I have the older model Wallace b. t. practice mute but I find it quite heavy.  I take it the new model is much lighter and more compact, similar to the BB mutes.
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« Reply #15 on: May 24, 2010, 09:58PM »

Just thought I'd write to praise the Wallace Mutes.

I've recently purchased the Compact Practice mute and the metal straight mute for Bass trom.

I'm very happy with both of them. Great products, great price and great service from Iain Muirhead.

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« Reply #16 on: May 25, 2010, 08:35AM »

I have the older model - bought it 4 years ago, and still like it.
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« Reply #17 on: May 25, 2010, 09:07AM »

I have the Wallace studio mute for bass trombone.  (Thanks, Chris!  Good!)  It's the best practice mute I've played.  The resistance is less than other mutes, and you can adjust the pitch.  That's a significant advantage over other practice mutes, which typically play quite sharp.  The only disadvantage is the weight, but I use the ErgoBone, so that's not as important a consideration for me as it might be for other players. 

I have Wick mutes for tenor and bass, SofTones for tenor and bass, the Best Brass Warm Up for tenor and bass, and the Yamaha Silent Brass.  I carry the Best Brass in my horns all the time.  Very useful for warming up, as the name implies.  Easy blowing for a practice mute. 
My experience--and it's only that--is that the Wicks have a tendency to play sharp over all, flat in the upper register, and sharp in the lower register.  Still a very useful mute. 
I was very disappointed in the SofTone mutes.  I even tried the suggestions about additional foam rings as found in Aaron Dygart's article:  http://www.trombone.org/articles/library/viewarticles.asp?ArtID=166
I found, however, that using the BestBrass with the SofTone gives a very quiet and lightweight mute, although it is very sharp. 
The Yamaha Silent Brass is a good system, but I think some people might be unwilling to pay for the mute and the electronic box.  But the box has some distinct advantages: the reverb function can help you with playing the same piece in different settings.  Recently had a concert series where the first night was in a very live and bright hall with a fair amount of reverb, and the next afternoon was in a very  dry hall.  I wish I'd thought to use it, 'cuz it really would have helped prepare me for the tremendous defferenc es required.
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« Reply #18 on: May 25, 2010, 09:14AM »

I just purchased a Wallace Compact Bass Trombone practice mute and I'm anxiously waiting for it to arrive. I've been on a Best Brass practice mute for a long time, but I generally don't like it a lot as it is very sharp. When you guys do extended practice on the Best Brass mute, do you pull out your tuning slide to compensate for the sharpness or just plug it in and blow the same way?
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« Reply #19 on: Jun 04, 2010, 04:14PM »

I received my Studio Mute today and it is going to be perfect for my use. I was looking for a mute that added resistance that was even through the registers. I am experimenting with mute playing as part of my practice routine and while the Best Brass worked, it was much more resistance than I wanted, given volume reduction is not my goal.
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Pro level? Pro level!  You make it pro, you make it good You make it loved and play nice Then its a pro level horn
Leif

I can justify my position with a trombone in my hands and that's good enough for me
Beware wise men bearing equations  C. Stearn
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