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Author Topic: Odds and Ends  (Read 32269 times)
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Bob Riddle

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« Reply #20 on: Sep 12, 2010, 03:09PM »

LX,
 Thanks so much for posting all of these time tested ideas in such a concise manner.Great ideas that every musician should take to heart.Thanks again.Keep on Posting!
Bob
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dj kennedy

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« Reply #21 on: Jun 04, 2011, 06:52AM »

man i  luv  the cornette  !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
 it was outta print  doug yeo  wanted a copy --roger flatt took  him one
   i tried to fix roger up w dougs  daughter  ???
     well roger eventually married a veryu nice bass bone player
==========
out here in the sticks
it was  a  stack of old trombone method books
from wayne thorne-my first teacher who sadly passed 
just after i started  band
and  no lessons  or  any  guidance  from trombonists after him
-------
it was words like lx  that really provided  support
edwin franco goldman
each  page lesson  had  a whole   page of  comments
on  tone   care of slide 
--------------
jjs  etude book  has  a few comments
but  for every jj word
there  are  thousands unspoke[N]
-------------
arbans   w/o  a teacher  esp  the  first  excercises
seem  so simple   -i never got it until paul kemp  laid it down
-------------
 i  was  hoping  the  bob mc chesney  would  add some  pictures
some  chat  and stuff to  his  new book
-------------
 we need inspiration   and need to be inspired
and to  have  hope  and quality of  life
the  nobility of the trombone  can  be  and should be enjoyable
--------------
 if we   were  able  to heed the  words of teachers [n preachers]
all would benefit
-------------
  and the cornette   duets    slam !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
---------------
 bobs  book  --maybe a little cheese    would  make it more tasty
 --------
thnxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx


I have the privilege of studying with Ales.  To him there are no exercises, only music. He is a real fanatic on that point. He is full of surprises. I will work on a set of etudes and come the lesson and somehow wind up working out of a different book. He is VERY demanding and will push you really, but it is worth it. He plays everything he assigns me including Cornette Grand Etude Number Two. The best part of the lesson is when he plays Rochut. YOu have to hear it to believe it. Listen to what he says. He is the man.
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XXXXooOOOOOXXXXXXXXX
LUCKY  LUCKY LUCKY  !!!!!!!!!!
Funbone
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« Reply #22 on: Jun 28, 2011, 03:08PM »

Always good to hear from you, DJ. All the best to you.

hf
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ebonchase
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« Reply #23 on: Jul 29, 2011, 03:56AM »

This is a great post.  Grin
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LX

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« Reply #24 on: Aug 27, 2011, 10:44PM »

Here is a very well-written clinic handout of odds and ends by John Hagstrom, trumpet player with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra. It echoes several of the concepts from my earlier list, but it's interesting to hear them from a world-class symphony orchestra trumpet player's perspective. For instance, I liked his idea about building endurance: "It is better to play for longer periods at about 80% of your maximum [or minimum] volume, making sure to evenly sustain every note. Spend more time at a lower volume that is still high enough to tax you without the risk of injury."

Best,

LX
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"Perfection is a achieved not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing left to take away."

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savio

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« Reply #25 on: Aug 27, 2011, 11:54PM »

Thanks for sharing all this. Its also interesting what he tell about "the sound image" inside our head. Some new for me there. Also interesting what he tell about how it is to play in that orchestra. The wish and agreement to make their brass sound "unity" must be very strong there. It is in all orchestras, but in Chicago this "will" is maybe even stronger? Anyway, this "unity" is for me what I love about the brass in Chicago. Its unbelievable, its so great. Some say this unity is boring and individuality is gone. Not so for me. In fact I believe this way to play demands a high standard of individual musicality from each in this group. Especial on the level they do. For less skilled players trying to do the same it would maybe turn in to be boring. It demands a very high insight in their own individuality, musicality and of course in all aspects about how to make a brass instrument work. Amazing.

Thanks for the pdf Alex. Since my English is some "special" I'm not sure how to do that 80% level playing?

Leif
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ctingle

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« Reply #26 on: Aug 28, 2011, 11:28AM »

Really good stuff, Alex!  Thanks mucho for sharing, yet again...
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Chip Tingle
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LX

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« Reply #27 on: Aug 28, 2011, 11:43AM »

Hey Leif,

I think John Hagstrom was referring to "80%" in terms of dynamics and volume.

I like your point about "unity". Balancing your musical identity as a soloist and/or an ensemble player is one of the keys to survival for trombonists. I sometimes tell students that in some musical situations, you're going be given the opportunity to be "THE" trombone player while, at other times, you will be given the opportunity to be "A" trombone player. The different roles require slightly different sets of skills yet both roles can be musically challenging and rewarding.

LX
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"Perfection is a achieved not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing left to take away."

Antoine de Saint-Exupery
ctingle

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« Reply #28 on: Aug 28, 2011, 12:05PM »

There's a fellow bonista here with a thread on musical depression...needing to hear your advice below, Sir LX.  Sensing our role du jour is a big part of daily bonistic life.

Hey Leif,

I think John Hagstrom was referring to "80%" in terms of dynamics and volume.

I like your point about "unity". Balancing your musical identity as a soloist and/or an ensemble player is one of the keys to survival for trombonists. I sometimes tell students that in some musical situations, you're going be given the opportunity to be "THE" trombone player while, at other times, you will be given the opportunity to be "A" trombone player. The different roles require slightly different sets of skills yet both roles can be musically challenging and rewarding.

LX
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Chip Tingle
Tenor & Bass Trombone, Euphonium, Tuba
NorCal freelancer & educator
415.898.8381
http://soundcloud.com/musichub recent demos
http://www.facebook.com/people/Chip-Tingle/1045829540
digitaltrombone

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« Reply #29 on: Sep 17, 2011, 12:04PM »

Thanks Alex! Its funny how obvious the truth is when someone tells you about it! Great stuff
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« Reply #30 on: Sep 17, 2011, 08:40PM »

this is definitely going to be kept permanently in my music bag!  Good!

thanks a bunch
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Obediah Bauer

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« Reply #31 on: Sep 18, 2011, 10:19AM »

Thank you for all these materials Alex. I value and appreciate your commitment to free knowledge and education for those who are willing to reach for it.
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« Reply #32 on: Sep 19, 2011, 09:37PM »

Definitely an excellent source! Thanks for sharing your knowledge and your experience with us. I will maintain these thoughts always alive in my mind and in my student's minds!
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Bmalta

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« Reply #33 on: Sep 20, 2011, 10:02PM »

Alex, this is all great, I come back and read it every now and again and it's always inspiring. Also I like how in the warmup PDF you reference the Main Method a lot. I was bummed when Roy had me buy it from him last year, and now I don't know what I would do without it. I used to think it lacked in long tones, and then I realized long tones and breathing were all over it. Also the sayings sprinkled throughout it make me want to practice more. Anyways I guess I'm saying that I can testify that it is a great, great book written by a great, great man.
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LX

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« Reply #34 on: Sep 20, 2011, 10:42PM »

Alex, this is all great, I come back and read it every now and again and it's always inspiring. Also I like how in the warmup PDF you reference the Main Method a lot. I was bummed when Roy had me buy it from him last year, and now I don't know what I would do without it. I used to think it lacked in long tones, and then I realized long tones and breathing were all over it. Also the sayings sprinkled throughout it make me want to practice more. Anyways I guess I'm saying that I can testify that it is a great, great book written by a great, great man.

Thanks for the kind words about Roy Main. Roy was a fantastic teacher and an even greater human.

He is DEEPLY missed.

In truth, the actual "Main Method"  differed slightly from student-to-student. He was so good at tailoring the material to each person's playing and, more importantly, learning style/needs. He was really gifted that way.

I always thought it was a shame that Roy was not better known to the greater trombone community outside the West Coast. Nearly every working freelance player in LA between the ages of 30 and 60 studied with him at some point. That's a LOT of great players, including Andy Martin, Bob McChesney, Luis Bonilla, Alan Kaplan, Bob Sanders, Francisco Torres, Ira Nepus, Art Velasco, Steve Holtman....etc etc!! He also taught so many NON professionals over the years and he did so with the same intensity and enthusiasm!! He was one of our instrument's greatest advocates!! Thankfully, we do have his books and all his many students out in the world today to keep his memory alive.

Best,

LX 
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Bmalta

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« Reply #35 on: Sep 20, 2011, 11:48PM »

This is so true. I am well aware of how lucky I was to study with him and even though it was only for about four months, I learned so much. To this day I will be practicing and think to myself from time to time "What would Roy say about that? Yep, I better go over it again." I think the best compliment I got out of him was when we were playing on the third buzzing exercise together on our horns and he messed up and said "Wow I screwed up because I was thinking that you couldn't have done that a few months ago"

I am also well aware of the company I am in, being that I can say I studied with him. My favorite story (aside from talking about Jazz robots on youtube or talking about Facebook and all the notifications he got on his last birthday for 5 minutes during a lesson) was how he was showing me an exercise having to do with playing the dominant 7th chord around the circle of 5ths. I then mentioned how I saw Andy Martin speak at the Cuesta jazz festival here in SLO when I was in high school and how he talked about taking a lick you liked and transposing it around the circle of 5ths. Roy looked up at me and chuckled and said "Ha, I taught him that." I started laughing because I'm just wondering to myself why this still surprises me. I then told him how the first time I had seen Andy Martin was with Tom Kubis' band at a festival, to which he replied "Oh yeh I used to sub in that band" and my response was the same. He then said how he taught you, Andy Martin, and the other tenor whose name I am blanking on.

All my rambling aside, I hope this helps illustrate my love for a man who taught me so much about the instrument I love and made me the musician I am now which I believe is twice the musician I was. I switched my major here at Poly from Mechanical Engineering to Music last Spring and I don't know if I could have passed my audition without his teaching. After his passing my Mom asked if I ever told him how much I appreciated his help and I told her no because he just would have said something to the effect of "You're welcome, now cut the mushy crap and go practice," considering after I passed my audition at my lesson the same day he said "Good job, now you'll have to practice three times as much. Open up your Arbans book to page....."

Brett


PS In order to keep this post remotely on topic, I think a lot of the things talked about are important to musicians because they offer the idea that there are multiple ways to go about playing something, which I feel I personally forget from time to time. So this is a great reminder.       
« Last Edit: Sep 22, 2011, 12:49AM by Bmalta » Logged

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jennconducts
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« Reply #36 on: Sep 25, 2011, 07:31PM »

Alex, allow me to add my thanks to you for this material.  It is meaningful, useful, and practical.  Thanks for it.

And I also send my thanks for all that you did for the Main Event.  It was such an honor to be there and to participate.  As you know so well, to know him is to love him.  And it's both intimidating and a joy to try to take on his studio at Cuesta.  I take that responsibility VERY seriously, believe me.  The playing is coming back, with a huge diet of long tones and lip slurs, and lots of the Main Method!  In time, I'd love to come down and take some instruction from you.

Thanks again for everything, friend.

Jenn Martin
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ottisthetrombonist

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« Reply #37 on: Jan 05, 2012, 06:27PM »

wow these are all great tips this one is going in the music binder!
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« Reply #38 on: Feb 19, 2012, 06:04PM »

this helps thanks

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« Reply #39 on: Jul 10, 2012, 07:08PM »


"Technique" is primarily how you do something, not just how fast you do something.

Puts me in mind of a story I heard about Sonny Rollins.

 Some tenor player had the seemingly good fortune to be on the same session as Sonny.  Thinking he would prove himself, he challenged Newk to a tenor battle.

Sonny called a ballad at about 40 bpm.

The young upstart had nothing to say, musically. He'd been hoping for "Cherokee" at 400, not musical expression .

 Guess who won the battle?
« Last Edit: Jul 12, 2012, 06:37AM by WaltTrombone » Logged

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