Bach 1G...unpopular ?
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bonearzt:
I used to play a 1g and thought it was a good piece,  but then tried a Black 1GM and have never looked back.

Not that I thought the Bach was bad,  but the Black feels so much more efficient and solid.

I guess Bach sells enough of them that they don't feel the need to change anything.
 
Go figure!


Eric



Daniel Harris:
Quote from: BGuttman on Jul 20, 2010, 05:44AM

My complaint against the 1G; moreso than it is too big for me, is that it uses the same blank as the 1 1/2G, and the rim is REALLY thin.  It's like a cookie cutter.


As I've said elsewhere, I find it curious that the cookie cutter charge is leveled at the 1G when there are other mouthpieces, such as the Schilke 60, with rims just as thin or thinner.

The 1G Megatone has been my primary mouthpiece for the past fifteen or sixteen years, (and the regular version for a year or two before that) and I find the rim to be the most comfortable and least fatiguing of any I have played. That is not to say it makes everything easy; staying on top of some aspects of articulation takes work, but the rim will let me do the work.

Thanks to the celebrated 1.5G thread that Chris Stearn started, I periodically spend a little time on my MV 1.5G and 2G. Lately, it has seemed to me that, the difference in cup diameter aside, the feel of the rims of the 1G and the 2G are remarkably similar - so much so that if I ever decided to move to a smaller mouthpiece, the 2G would be a much easier switch than the 1.5G. This experience suggests to me that Bach probably put a lot more thought into the rim design of the 1G than some folks here give them credit for.

Quote from: Horn Builder on Jul 20, 2010, 06:09AM

It also has relatively little mass around the cup of the piece, and, for me, misses out on that sense of "blowing into something substantial" that you get with a piece that has more mass. If Bach had scaled up the outer blank to keep the balance of rim width and mass around the cup of the piece similar to that of the 1.5G, they would have had a winner! But alas.....


That is where the Megatone version comes in, and, for me, at least, solves the problem Matt is talking about. As with any mouthpiece, there are compromises and tradeoffs. That said, I just haven't found anything else yet (and I admit I haven't tried everything out there) that is in the same league as the 1G Megatone when it comes to depth of sound and color right in the core of the sound, as opposed to the surface.

Finally, I would say to the original poster, if you are interested in the 1G, try the Megatone; if you don't you aren't really giving the design a fair shake. I would further suggest that if you do try it, you will probably need to give it some time, especially if you are coming from a mouthpiece that doesn't have as large a throat and backbore; the sound may seem airy at first, and you will need to allow some time for the sound to fill in.

Dan Harris




 
GetzenBassPlayer:
Quote from: Daniel Harris on Jul 20, 2010, 07:47AM

As I've said elsewhere, I find it curious that the cookie cutter charge is leveled at the 1G when there are other mouthpieces, such as the Schilke 60, with rims just as thin or thinner.

The 1G Megatone has been my primary mouthpiece for the past fifteen or sixteen years, (and the regular version for a year or two before that) and I find the rim to be the most comfortable and least fatiguing of any I have played. That is not to say it makes everything easy; staying on top of some aspects of articulation takes work, but the rim will let me do the work.

Thanks to the celebrated 1.5G thread that Chris Stearn started, I periodically spend a little time on my MV 1.5G and 2G. Lately, it has seemed to me that, the difference in cup diameter aside, the feel of the rims of the 1G and the 2G are remarkably similar - so much so that if I ever decided to move to a smaller mouthpiece, the 2G would be a much easier switch than the 1.5G. This experience suggests to me that Bach probably put a lot more thought into the rim design of the 1G than some folks here give them credit for.

That is where the Megatone version comes in, and, for me, at least, solves the problem Matt is talking about. As with any mouthpiece, there are compromises and tradeoffs. That said, I just haven't found anything else yet (and I admit I haven't tried everything out there) that is in the same league as the 1G Megatone when it comes to depth of sound and color right in the core of the sound, as opposed to the surface.

Finally, I would say to the original poster, if you are interested in the 1G, try the Megatone; if you don't you aren't really giving the design a fair shake. I would further suggest that if you do try it, you will probably need to give it some time, especially if you are coming from a mouthpiece that doesn't have as large a throat and backbore; the sound may seem airy at first, and you will need to allow some time for the sound to fill in.

Dan Harris


I prefer thinner rims. I loved my Monette, but the deal breaker was the rim felt too wide. It did not give me the flexibility that I got out of more narrow rims. I don't need a lot of pressure to play, which I think goes a long way in making thin rims acceptable.



 
sfboner:
It's worth noting that relatively few manufacturers actually use different size blanks.  What seems to have generally happened is that they started using a bigger blank for their entire product lines.

For example, a Greg Black 1G is made from the same blank as his tenor pieces.  But it's a big blank - my 1.25 has decent mass, and my 4.5C weighs a ton.
donn:
Quote from: Daniel Harris on Jul 20, 2010, 07:47AM

As I've said elsewhere, I find it curious that the cookie cutter charge is leveled at the 1G when there are other mouthpieces, such as the Schilke 60, with rims just as thin or thinner.


And that's why I would have agreed that the 1G is "unpopular".  Some won't like one or another feature of the mouthpiece, others just don't like such large mouthpieces, but between these two mouthpieces, the Schilke 60 is the one that seems to be the archetypal big bass and the 1G is rarely mentioned.  In contrast to the mid range bass, where 1 1/2G is archetypal and the 58 is rarely heard about.

But - do I have it backwards?  Maybe I see so many other manufacturers making their own 1 1/2G, and their own 60, because the original models are unsatisfactory - and no one bothers to take on the 1G or the 58 because ... they're already perfect!
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