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Author Topic: Range probelems  (Read 5905 times)
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« on: Mar 12, 2004, 03:50PM »

Im in eigth grade, and i can only get up to a high f. Well sometimes to a high b-flat, but not very ofton. Do you have any tips for getting up into the higher register?
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« Reply #1 on: Mar 12, 2004, 04:49PM »

Well, I'm very, very past 8th grade and I still have upper range problems.   What excercise/lesson books are you using right now??  Do you have the Remington warmup book or Arban's?  Those would be good places to start.  

Unfortunately, it also might be a matter of you needing to "grow into" that part of your register.  As you get older, your muscle control, especially your air control, will change and strengthen.   You need to be able to sustain higher airflows to make hitting the upper notes easier.  

Are you pinching or straining your embrouchure when you get up there?  The Remington book has some excercises to help stay relaxed in the upper register.
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« Reply #2 on: Mar 12, 2004, 04:57PM »

How much time are you devoting to your high range?  Is it part of your regular warmup?  My teacher tells me it's like doing weights, so he has me do my high range exercices every other day.  It's helped me a bunch.
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« Reply #3 on: Mar 13, 2004, 12:53PM »

Try doing lip slurs every day as part of your warm-ups (if you dont do lip slurs your range will never come).  Also as suggested before get the Arban or Rubank books and find some warm-ups from there that you like.
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« Reply #4 on: Mar 13, 2004, 03:36PM »

From when I was in grade 8, I never needed to play past an F.  I could only get to a G (I never practiced in grade 8), but from what *I* did, F was a fine enough range.  I now have an octave and a bit above that  two years later, but I never need to use it (unless I want to harass the trumpet players by playing their parts  Grin )
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« Reply #5 on: Mar 14, 2004, 10:36AM »

I use the Charles Colin book "Lip Flexibilities" with all my students. These exercises force you to use proper air support. Remember that developing range takes time. As pointed out already, your lip muscles have to mature.
Whatever you do, do not pinch or put pressure in your neck area to get high notes.
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« Reply #6 on: Mar 16, 2004, 09:25PM »

Well, I must be the exact opistie here.  I don't have any range problems at all,  I can get an octove above the high Bb (the one 4 ledger lines above the staff) and I can get the triple pedal Bb (BBBb).  I don't think that I'm doing alot of strange stuff, jus regular practicing scales and lip slurs everyday.  
O, and I'm in the 8th grade, too.
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« Reply #7 on: Mar 16, 2004, 11:41PM »

Quote from: "kbd39452"
Well, I must be the exact opistie here.  I don't have any range problems at all,  I can get an octove above the high Bb (the one 4 ledger lines above the staff) and I can get the triple pedal Bb (BBBb).  I don't think that I'm doing alot of strange stuff, jus regular practicing scales and lip slurs everyday.  
O, and I'm in the 8th grade, too.


Hmmm, well I"m not saying you can't do it.....but double Bb is a note that I have plenty of trouble with even on alto.  And I don't even know if any tuba players here can get the triple pedal Bb.  

But back to the original question of high range.  A good way to improve your high range is to work on exactly the opposite.  Work a lot in your low range.  Trigger, pedals, and false tones.  Play rochuts and other etudes down the octave.  Not only will this improve your low range (which is just as important, if not more so that your high range) but it will actually strengthen your chops and improve your high range.

Sean
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« Reply #8 on: Mar 17, 2004, 02:34AM »

Well said Sean. It is good to work your way down to help yourself extend your range upwards also. It helps with air velocity and control. Also, aside from Remington, Arbans, and Colin, if you don't want to buy books immediately, a great tactic is to lightly attack notes going up a scale... i.e. play a B flat scale going up just pinging or bopping every note. But, having a solid F 2 ledger lines above the staff and an occasional Bflat above that is pretty good, especially in 8th grade.

As far as kbd is concerned, IF you are telling the truth, as I can't even think of a PROFESSIONAL trombonist with that range perfected, this is not an invitation for you to come toot your horn. This is a forum asking for advice, so it might be a little more constructive to give bob, or all of the rest of us for that matter, advice of exercises you may know or techniques to help this problem.
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« Reply #9 on: Mar 17, 2004, 09:22AM »

Theotherbob-

Don't feel bad. I'm also waaaaay past eighth grade and have problems in my high register. All the advice that's been posted is great. I would only add one thing, and I apologize if it's covered in one of the books mentioned.

The exercise my teacher recommends is a really good one. It's actually much like what Bonehed recommends. If you get up in your sixth partial,(the F above the second ledger line), you can start slurring in very small intervals. If you can get the B-flat, you can get a three note slur: F-Ab-Bb. Do that up and down a few times slurred, and then ARTICULATE it, with just a light tongue. Then do Ab-Bb-C, Bb-C-D, and so on ad nauseam.

I've found that I can slur a lot higher than I can tongue, which I'd imagine is the case for most people. On a great day, I can slur right up to a double F or G and hold it out with decent tone, but if I have to tongue those notes or jump up to them, I don't even come close. Do slurs up as high as you can and then do the exact same pattern with tongue. That will get you really focusing the air and feeling where the note is in your muscles. I think that is the most difficult part for me - feeling where note is. Tonguing them each in turn will let you feel exactly where your lips need to be to produce the note.

Also, there's a great exercise for extending your endurance, which is important if you're wanting to play up high. I believe it was created by Carmine Caruso, but I could be wrong. Anyway, it's the "ho-ho-toe" exercise. Set your embouchure and start playing a chromatic scale. You can start on low Bb or middle F, whichever you prefer. Now, this is important. Once you put the horn on your face, don't take it off. Breathe through your nose...this is one of the only times you'll get told to do that. ;-) So, on each note, you're going to say "ho-ho-toe". Air attack the first two notes and articulate the third. Keep going up until you feel like you're losing control of the corners of your mouth. Take a break, around a minute or so, and then start again, a partial up. Do it starting on three partials, and then stop. Be aware that it will wear you out, so you might want to save it for the end of a practice session. Don't do it every day - maybe every other or even every third. But I promise you it works for extending your endurance, and for strengthening your corners, which will carry over and help your high playing.

Good luck!

Jessica
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« Reply #10 on: Mar 17, 2004, 07:59PM »

Kleinhammer's _The Art of Trombone Playing_ seldom gets mentioned in the forum, but it has some good range developing exercises.  Pages 47-48 go up to      and you get to read some tenor and alto clef, too.  Page 76 goes up to     .  It works well as a warm-up, too.  Also, page 83 is rather fun for its octave jumps.  Start at the bottom of the page and work up.
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« Reply #11 on: Mar 17, 2004, 08:17PM »

theotherbob,

You have been getting a lot of great suggestions, from other Forum members. Just do not get discouraged, as you can see, from others, we all have been in this same situation.

I really like the suggestion (being a bass trombonist) concerning building into your lower register, also. I always had a weak upper range, when I was a tenor trombone player; and, I made a switch to bass trombone, and whenever I would go back to tenor, I found my high range was greatly improved on tenor. Looks like I can attribute the improvement to the things I learned on bass trombone, like improved air supply and that important relaxation in the low register, which we all have to carry over into the upper register.

There is one short, inexpensive method book, which I have used with my private students, in the past, and I still hope is might be available for trombone (I recently ordered one for trumpet, from www.hickeys.com) and is is called "Embouchre Builder" by Lowell Little. This book will give you some great basic lip slur studies, to get this whole process started. All of the exercises are fairly easy and are well organized, for a first attempt.

Later, a method like the Emory Remington Warm-UP (Hunsberger edition) or any of the other suggested books will continue what you have begun, with the Lowell Little book.

Good luck, go slow and listen to what you are doing. Don't be afraid to go over and over these exercises. I have been doing the same Remingtons for 30 years, almost daily. If I have limited time to practice, I still try to get in a few minutes of Remington, before a gig or concert.
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« Reply #12 on: Mar 18, 2004, 11:55AM »

you might want to listen to some of the suggestions the tastte bros have.

http://www.tasteebros.com/high.htm

 Grin
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« Reply #13 on: Mar 18, 2004, 09:54PM »

I have a range problem with anything higher then       My lower range is much stronger then my high one so I'm using my own set of warm-ups to develope higher ranges.
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« Reply #14 on: Mar 19, 2004, 05:17AM »

Quote from: "Migsbone"
you might want to listen to some of the suggestions the tastte bros have.

http://www.tasteebros.com/high.htm

 Grin


Just so it's clear to some impressionable students, most of the suggestions on this web site are actually jokes, not honest advice.  I would look elsewhere for real advice.

Dave
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