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Author Topic: joining the "olds" crowd  (Read 43899 times)
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Mandalf
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« Reply #300 on: May 10, 2017, 11:44PM »

I have an Olds Superstar V-20, got it about 5 years ago and I love it. The slides have a bit of rust on the stocking (came with the horn) so it is occasionally scratchy, and the bell has a few dings (my bad), but is otherwise a beaut. 
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Brer Cottonmouth

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« Reply #301 on: May 11, 2017, 08:54AM »

Not a lot of mention of the Studio model.  Any thoughts on this version of the old OLDS?   Good!

I picked up an LA-era Studio on eBay a few years back. Basically, I bid on it because it was going for far less money than I thought reasonable and just wanted to see this vintage instrument get the respect it deserved. I have two Supers and a Recording also from that era and love them all. But I find myself reaching for the Studio most often. It's a really fun horn. And I too am curious about them. I assume there weren't as many made as Supers, Recordings, and Ambassadors (Specials, even), because I rarely see them listed on eBay.

I also notice that the Studio seems lighter than the Super—it's not as surprising that it's also lighter than the larger Recording.
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« Reply #302 on: May 13, 2017, 07:30PM »

I've noticed that the Olds Self Balancing trombone, just says the "The Olds" on the bell. From what I can tell, this is the only Olds that doesn't have the model name engraved on the bell(?). I'm wondering why....is it because the name is too blasé? It's like having a car named "The Chevrolet"
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Doug Elliott
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« Reply #303 on: May 13, 2017, 08:29PM »

I have a flat wrap .547/.562 TIS bass trombone that also just says "The Olds"
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BGuttman
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« Reply #304 on: May 13, 2017, 08:41PM »

I've noticed that the Olds Self Balancing trombone, just says the "The Olds" on the bell. From what I can tell, this is the only Olds that doesn't have the model name engraved on the bell(?). I'm wondering why....is it because the name is too blasé? It's like having a car named "The Chevrolet"

My 1925 TIS model just says "F. E. Olds and Son" on the bell.  Not even "The Olds".  But it has the engraving of the bear playing the trombone.
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Bruce Guttman
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JohnL
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« Reply #305 on: May 13, 2017, 09:45PM »

Olds tended not to engrave model names on trombones in the pre-WWII era. TIS Standards, Self-Balancings, and early Supers (pre-tone ring) usually just marked with the company name or "The Olds". Radio, Radio City, and Military Models, along with Supers with tone rings, have the model name engraved.
When all they made was the TIS Standard and the Self-Balancing, it was pretty obvious which was which.
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Arrowhead99
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« Reply #306 on: May 15, 2017, 03:03PM »

Anyone have any experience with the O-25 horn? I read somewhere-maybe it was an older thread- a glowing review of the horn
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« Reply #307 on: May 15, 2017, 07:40PM »

Forum Member Macbone has either an O-23 or O-25 (can't remember which).  Send him a PM or E-mail.
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Bruce Guttman
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Arrowhead99
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« Reply #308 on: May 20, 2017, 01:23PM »

Thanks. He said doesn't know about the O-25. Anyone have any experience with this horn?
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Posaunus
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« Reply #309 on: May 20, 2017, 06:08PM »

I have an Olds O-25, made in 1974 and purchased a while ago from a Trombone Forum member (thanks Tyler) that I like very much.  As far as I can tell, this is the same instrument that was labeled "Opera" when I played one in the early 1970's.  (Nostalgia trip for me!)  Now sometimes called "Symphony" but mine is only engraved O-25. 
[Large-bore tenor trombone w/closed wrap F-attachment, 0.554" bore, 0.565" bore F-attachment, single rotor, 8.5" red brass bell]

It's a little quirky - the mouthpiece that came with the trombone (an Olds 15) is quite small with a small-diameter throat).  The larger Olds 20 mouthpiece is a much better match.  The mouthpiece receiver is not "standard" size (a little small), so other large-bore mouthpieces will not insert as far.  And the ergonomics of the rotor lever ("trigger") leave something to be desired - but I'm getting used to it.  The trombone plays very nicely, with a large full sound (as you would expect from such a large bore) with the right mouthpiece.  (I'm still experimenting.) 
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Arrowhead99
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« Reply #310 on: May 20, 2017, 06:48PM »

Does the Olds 20 MP have a 25.65mm rim? That's what I usually play on
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« Reply #311 on: May 20, 2017, 07:30PM »

The rim of the Olds 20 mouthpiece is about 25.6mm inside diameter (hard to measure precisely), with a rather V-shaped cup; the throat is ~6.70mm.  Sort of the same size as a Bach 5GS - but different.  You may be accustomed to a somewhat larger throat, but otherwise may be comfortable with the Olds 20.  I think the Olds O-25 trombone would be quite happy with a larger mouthpiece.  As I said, I'm still experimenting. 
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« Reply #312 on: May 21, 2017, 04:49AM »

I recently purchased a beautiful Wedge Delrin plastic mouthpiece for my S-23 bass.

Using black wet/dry P400 silicon carbide waterproof abrasive paper ( AKA SANDPAPER) I was able to reduce the shank to a perfect vintage Olds large shank size. This is to replace my #20 mouthpiece that came with the S-23.

It takes awhile, but Wedge delrin mouthpieces can be adapted for less than $2 to any vintage Olds leadpipe.

The main reason for reducing the shank was to also shorten it to bring the horn up to 440, as there is nowhere to cut an S-23 to get it up to pitch.
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John McKevitt
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« Reply #313 on: May 21, 2017, 05:40AM »

Before cutting your instruments,You could always try pulling the Olds leadpipe and trying one of the more standard ( Morse Taper?)leadpipes which will accept a modern standard large shank mouthpiece.
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« Reply #314 on: May 21, 2017, 08:28AM »

John,

  For most players any stock vintage Olds mouthpiece will play very well and up to modern pitch ( 440+) on a vintage Olds bone.

All of the vintage original pre-1970 Olds bones made with pre-WWII R&D are flat with modern mouthpieces. The shanks stick out too far, and my own theory is that they were designed and made for players with smaller oral cavities.
How could there be smaller oral cavities? Adult males were significantly smaller then. Shorter and slighter in the rib cage.

To get a vintage Olds small bore horn up to pitch the use of a 12C or the like is a cheap fix. The use of a Wedge Delrin mouthpiece shimmed down is the perfect and permanent fix. Especially if you trim 2" or more off of tuning slide length and add the Olds shank mouthpiece.

My S-23 is tuning-in-the-slide. Drastic measures needed to be taken. Especially since my S-23 has a 10 1/2" bell. (stock....10 1/2").
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JohnL
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« Reply #315 on: May 21, 2017, 08:43AM »

Before cutting your instruments,You could always try pulling the Olds leadpipe and trying one of the more standard ( Morse Taper?)leadpipes which will accept a modern standard large shank mouthpiece.
Been there, done that. Most standard large-shank leadpipes do not seat all the way into a .554" Olds inner slide. Of course, if you like the way the Olds plays, messing with the leadpipe isn't really an option, anyway.

Best to attack it from the mouthpiece side. Most large-shank mouthpieces have enough meat on the shank that they can be turned down.

I've toyed with the idea of having some mouthpieces made up in common sizes to fit Olds, but it would entail a substantial initial investment that I would probably never recoup. I did have three "special" mouthpieces scanned by Kanstul - a custom Plimpton/Jameson bass mouthpiece, an original Olds "G", and an original Olds F alto. To the best of my knowledge, Kanstul has had no calls for further copies beyond the ones they originally made for me.

My best suggestion? Contact Doug Elliott. He has the dimensions for the common Olds large and small shanks, along with the F alto, and doesn't charge a fortune to make them. He can also help you find the combination of backbore, cup, and rim that works for you and your trombone.
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« Reply #316 on: May 21, 2017, 11:29AM »

Are there any Olds players on the forum who also drive an Olds? Idea!
(I'm referring to any pre-1972 cars)
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« Reply #317 on: May 25, 2017, 09:14PM »

I had an Olds F-85, the predecessor to the Olds Cutlass. Awesome car for a yute in his late teens.
 I just rejoined the "OLds Crowd" with the purchase of a TIS 10"bell Fullerton 297XXX  double valve all original Bass Bone. S23? Sweet and Dark... just the Way I like my Women.. Purchased for $200.00  HaHa
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« Reply #318 on: May 25, 2017, 09:42PM »

I had a 1970 Olds Delta 88 in the mid-90's.  Two-door, hard top, white...  What a car!

And I have owned several Olds.  But not at the same time...
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BGuttman
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« Reply #319 on: May 26, 2017, 10:52AM »

Are there any Olds players on the forum who also drive an Olds? Idea!
(I'm referring to any pre-1972 cars)

My first car was a 1967 Cutlass Supreme with the large 8 cylinder engine, air conditioning, 4 Bbl carb, and automatic transmission.  Ate gas like it was candy.  And it had to run on Premium (at 40 cents per gallon).  Not quite a land yacht like my fathers later Cadillac, but close.  I also learned on my fathers F-88.  Big.  Square.  Scary to drive the West Side Highway.
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Bruce Guttman
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