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Author Topic: joining the "olds" crowd  (Read 48868 times)
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Arrowhead99
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« Reply #320 on: Jun 23, 2017, 01:18PM »

My dream car would be a '55 Olds. would love to then take a picture of my horn with THAT car.
Anyways, I just pulled out an L.A. Olds Super out of the closet. Somehow I overlooked this horn. I love the efficient build and compact tone this trombone has!  Idea!
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oslide

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« Reply #321 on: Jan 07, 2018, 08:57AM »

Actually I'm not new to Olds horns, having played a Recording many years ago.
Later, I also made acquaintance with Supers, a Studio, and even a P-16.

Not too long ago, a TTF thread mentioning Bill Pierce got me - once again - interested in Olds Operas. What a sound! Till then, I'd always shied away from large bore horns due to my chronic asthma, but finally I decided to have a go at it.

Okay - but where to get an Opera in good shape at a reasonable price? The answer - you guessed it - DJ Kennedy.

Not only did he have a very nice straight Opera 'at hand', he also found me an excellent case for it as well as a MV12 mouthpiece (what else?) that I had asked him for. Because at the moment he didn't have a fitting MP adapter, he himself made one for me from a sheet of sterling silver, with engravings and all it takes (that's why I call the horn my 'sterling Opera'). Kudos to DJ for his support and dedication!

So, since a few days, I'm getting to know this horn. A wonderful sound, like a bell, so clear and pure! On the other hand it couldn't feel much heavier if it really was made from sterling silver. Being used to playing lighweight .500 horns it's a challenge for my left shoulder. But certainly it's worth the effort and I don't regret my decision. What an adventure!
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sally
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« Reply #322 on: Jan 11, 2018, 12:40AM »

Hello everyone, after lurking for a while, this is my first post.
I am a member of the Olds Club now, as my LA Olds Standard arrived today! The serial number dates him to 1942. He has a 7 inch bell, dual bore and very sweet sound
"Stan" is my first real trombone, after a P-bone and then a loaner horn from the brass band I play in.
Now just to get the tuning slide unstuck (I've been reading past threads on this and I'm trying the WD-40 first).
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BGuttman
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« Reply #323 on: Jan 11, 2018, 11:50AM »

Is it stuck fully closed or partly open?  If it's a little open you can try to tap it closed (use a light soft hammer or crab mallet).  If it's fully closed there are a few tricks you can try.  It's really a quick fix for somebody who does brass repairs as it's a very common problem, and probably won't cost much.

Welcome to the Olds club.  Mine is a 1925 with tuning in the slide and an oddity: an 8" bell.  It really plays nicely and I love it for French orchestral rep.
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Bruce Guttman
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« Reply #324 on: Jan 12, 2018, 02:50AM »

Sounds like a nice beast. I'm loving mine. I think I might look at getting a counter-weight for him - he's a bit front heavy.

The slide is stuck fast in the fully-in position. WD-40 applied today.
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dj kennedy

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« Reply #325 on: Jan 13, 2018, 02:55PM »

this  trombone  was recently  owned   by CLARK GAYTON [in recording sessions all week w STING]   has the  look 
aaron chandler  did  slide  and dent workup  ////i  bought  another  opera  --to get  the case
 MV 12  --theres  one  on eBay this  week @ 200  !!!!!!--they are  a  BIG  HORN esp after  2b size
 horns  !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!  //



Actually I'm not new to Olds horns, having played a Recording many years ago.
Later, I also made acquaintance with Supers, a Studio, and even a P-16.

Not too long ago, a TTF thread mentioning Bill Pierce got me - once again - interested in Olds Operas. What a sound! Till then, I'd always shied away from large bore horns due to my chronic asthma, but finally I decided to have a go at it.

Okay - but where to get an Opera in good shape at a reasonable price? The answer - you guessed it - DJ Kennedy.

Not only did he have a very nice straight Opera 'at hand', he also found me an excellent case for it as well as a MV12 mouthpiece (what else?) that I had asked him for. Because at the moment he didn't have a fitting MP adapter, he himself made one for me from a sheet of sterling silver, with engravings and all it takes (that's why I call the horn my 'sterling Opera'). Kudos to DJ for his support and dedication!

So, since a few days, I'm getting to know this horn. A wonderful sound, like a bell, so clear and pure! On the other hand it couldn't feel much heavier if it really was made from sterling silver. Being used to playing lighweight .500 horns it's a challenge for my left shoulder. But certainly it's worth the effort and I don't regret my decision. What an adventure!

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XXXXooOOOOOXXXXXXXXX
LUCKY  LUCKY LUCKY  !!!!!!!!!!
dj kennedy

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« Reply #326 on: Jan 13, 2018, 03:01PM »

SO A LONELY VERY TARNISHED   olds  appeared  with  very unusual deco engraving
 and  at  first  glance  after  opening  the very simple shaped  case
   i knew  i had  struck GOLD !!!!!!!  --yes  GOLD  plated  cloudy tarnish --duo  bore
 also  an unmarked  lightweight  GOLD PLATED  MOUTH PIECE !!!  obviously  a  custom
  slip  joint  duo bore  nickle  plated inners   serial lo 7000s
   slide excellent  - Pant Pant Pant Pant Pant Pant Pant Pant Pant
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XXXXooOOOOOXXXXXXXXX
LUCKY  LUCKY LUCKY  !!!!!!!!!!
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« Reply #327 on: Feb 02, 2018, 06:37AM »

I'm giving serious thought to biting the bullet and joining the crowd. I figure if I want to learn about an Olds horn, this is the thread to ask in. Can anyone vouch for using an L.A. Super on lead bone in a big band?

I'm looking at a 1940s L.A. Olds Super with tone ring, not too pretty but the asking price is really good. My 1934 Elkhart Cavalier is just too hard to center above F, probably due to the really leaky slide. Playing lead bone parts in big band, it is not cutting the mustard in terms of sound or ease of playing. From what I've heard, a Super might be a good replacement, but of course I've never played an Olds before.
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« Reply #328 on: Feb 02, 2018, 10:25AM »

Can anyone vouch for using an L.A. Super on lead bone in a big band?

Super could be a good choice for lead bone if the trombone is in good playing shape with a good slide.  Just be aware that the mouthpiece receiver is undersize, so unless you get an Olds mouthpiece (the Olds 3 - roughly 12C size - was standard for the Super), your small-shank mouthpieces may not drop in as far, slightly affecting intonation, etc.  Some Olds players shave down the shank of their favorite mouthpiece to match the receiver taper.  But I've had pretty good success with some (but not all) off-the-shelf small-shank mouthpieces. 

Try it - you may love it!   Good!
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Nanook

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« Reply #329 on: Feb 02, 2018, 11:48AM »

I'm giving serious thought to biting the bullet and joining the crowd. I figure if I want to learn about an Olds horn, this is the thread to ask in. Can anyone vouch for using an L.A. Super on lead bone in a big band?

I'm looking at a 1940s L.A. Olds Super with tone ring, not too pretty but the asking price is really good.




I'm not yet good enough to answer your question, but I can pass on to you what my instructor told me...I have a gold tone ring model (no lacquer), and the sound is far superior to the silver tone ring I also have...I was told that my Super can be a great lead trombone, as well as blend in with the community band....The greatest endorsement was when he said that he wants my gold ring tone bone when I die...

Nanook
« Last Edit: Feb 03, 2018, 07:56AM by Nanook » Logged

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JohnL
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« Reply #330 on: Feb 02, 2018, 11:57AM »

Gold tone ring Supers apparently date from right after WWII. S/N's are around 17,000-20,000.

Sure, you can play lead on a Super. As mentioned earlier, some people do have issues with finding the right mouthpiece.
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« Reply #331 on: Feb 04, 2018, 09:57AM »

It is official, I am now the owner of a 1950 L.A. Olds Super! I can't wait for it to arrive so I can give it a blow! Especially happy because I think I got a really good deal. Also glad that I don't have to hunt down an Olds 3... one came included!
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Brer Cottonmouth

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« Reply #332 on: Feb 11, 2018, 12:46PM »

Congratulations and welcome to the club. Let us know what you think of your Super.
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« Reply #333 on: Feb 11, 2018, 02:19PM »

Congratulations and welcome to the club. Let us know what you think of your Super.

It is incredible! The slide on mine needs some work, but it's playable. The high range slots almost effortlessly, and the Olds 3 is way more comfortable than I expected. The sound is gorgeous, though it's hard to change color. I also like the thin handgrip, to my surprise. I wish my large bores had it!
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Brer Cottonmouth

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« Reply #334 on: Feb 13, 2018, 06:43AM »

I also like the thin handgrip, to my surprise. I wish my large bores had it!
Yeah, I really like the thin handgrip, too. And I always figured in the cost of a cleaning/slide alignment when I bought a vintage horn. Glad you like the Super. I sure love mine.
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But the nights av Saint Patherick's Days in Athlone
Folks dare not go by the ould graveyard alone,
For they say that McCarty sits on his tombstone
And plays this sad tune on a phantom trombone
MikeBMiller
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« Reply #335 on: Feb 13, 2018, 06:48AM »

I picked up an Olds Special trumpet from the 60's over Christmas break on Ebay for $350. It is a very nice instrument. It would be even nicer if I could play it worth a hoot.
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