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Rennaisongsman
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« Reply #1140 on: Dec 01, 2016, 12:17PM »

Hi I'm relatively new
My name is Anthony, you can call my Tony if u want idc
I have played for four years, started in fourth grade
And...yeah that's pretty much it Hi

Welcome, Anthony!  Great that you got started in 4th (that doesn't happen that much anymore, I don't think).

I'm Kevin, from the Joplin, MO area.  I'm a musical "jack of all trades, master of none", I'm afraid.  No excellence but lots of fun...

I took up trombone in 5th grade (was already studying piano) and have played off/on for 40 years.  Highlights include principal trombone with the Southwest Baptist University Symphonic Wind Ensemble for two years in the 80's, touring the Midwest and playing at the CBDNA in Chicago in '87, and playing lead in the Jazz Ensemble there for about 2 years.

I taught public school music during the 90's in Missouri.  During that time I played (2nd?) trombone with the Ozark Festival Orchestra, in Monett.  I am now working in IT (for about 16 years).

My dad also played trombone, so when he moved to be near me a few years ago we both joined the Heartland Concert Band (Joplin/Carthage area).  I was able to play almost two full seasons before dad went into the hospital.  He died in 2012.

My wife & I homeschool our daughter, and have all re-joined the Heartland Band to help her learn the flute faster.

You all have already been quite helpful to me in re-introducing me to the manufacturer landscape.  I hope to learn from the posts here and hopefully not be as much of a troll as I've been in a lot of other forums ... :)
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Bubblelord
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« Reply #1141 on: Aug 05, 2017, 03:29PM »

Hi, I'm a high school bass trombonist in Seattle. I play in the school's wind ensemble, jazz ensemble, and orchestra. I also do some combo stuff and play with a local youth orchestra. I'm hoping to get good enough to maybe major in music in college but who knows.
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BGuttman
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« Reply #1142 on: Aug 05, 2017, 03:49PM »

Welcome all.  I don't check this thread often so I owe quite a few welcomes (used to be RedHotMama was the Greeter).

If you haven't discovered it, the Beginners and Returning Trombonists has a lot of good stuff for you.  Practice Room tends to be more focused on individual problems.

The Search function on the Forum tends to be a little hokey, but using a Google Search with a /TromboneForum switch often will focus it into this Forum.  Sometimes I get a little testy when I get a pile of identical questions like "what kind of trombone should I buy" with no additional information.  Often there will be similar posts and you can find your information.

We have a lot of folks both professional and enthusiastic amateur who probably have worked through almost anything you may come up against.  Tap our collective knowledge.

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Bruce Guttman
Solo Trombone, Hollis Town Band
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Zandit75
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« Reply #1143 on: Sep 14, 2017, 04:57PM »

Hi everyone!
Just introducing myself from freezing cold Tasmania, way down Down Under!
I'm 42, Married, love long walks on the beach........with my dogs!! :D
After starting to play the trom in highschool way back in '87, I joined the local Brass Band and started improving dramatically.
I started on the Yamaha Student Tenor troms until I was given a brand new Besson Sovereign Bb/F in 1991 by the Band.
I stuck with the band until approx 2000 when I started loosing interest in playing the same stuff over and over again.
Throughout this time I competed in many State level solo comps, and was lucky enough to win several State championships.
I only had the opportunity to compete in one National Solo comp during this time, and I finished 6th, which I was extremely happy with.
Last year, my old Bandmaster passed away, and they held a memorial concert for all past and present members to participate in. There were over 60 players on stage ranging from 7-83 year olds! It was a massive sound with 9 Basses, and 8 Trom players, 3 of which were Bass Troms!
I continue playing with the band after the concert, and have been plugging away for last 12mths on the same old Besson Sovereign on the Bass Trom part.
This last week I have been upgraded to a S.E.Shires Bass Trom, and this will take some getting used to. The second trigger has me completely bamboozeled, and the lungs need some upgrades!
Anyway, thanks for having me on here, looks like I have some research to do!
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BGuttman
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« Reply #1144 on: Sep 14, 2017, 06:29PM »

Welcome! Hi

A Shires double plug horn is a great instrument.  I saw an awful lot of them at the Australian, New Zealand, and European Brass Band Championships last spring (fall for you ;-) ).

The second trigger will make either Eb below the staff appear in 1st position or (more likely) D below the staff appear in 1st position.

With both triggers in play, the positions are even longer than you had with your F plug.  In fact, there are really only 5 on the slide.  With a Bb/F/D, low C is approximately in 4th position (on the un-valved horn) which I would call Double Valve 3 (there is a Double Valve 2 about halfway between that and 1st).  Go out a bit further to find double valve 4, and low B.

If you have an independent version, using the second valve only gives Gb and Db in 1st position with the 2nd valve alone.  I have found this to be very useful for two things:

1.  F in 1st is generally flat, and using the Gb attachment it can be shortened since it now is in 2nd.

2.  Some runs in sharp keys (in orchestra, mostly) do well with C# in a close position.

Alan Raph published a great method for double valve bass and might be a good purchase.  Once you have your feet wet you can get the Aharoni books on bass trombone.
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Bruce Guttman
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Wasatch Oz

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« Reply #1145 on: Nov 13, 2017, 11:36AM »

I never did introduce myself and should.

Born in California I moved to Utah when I was young. Still live here now and love the outdoor opportunities Utah offers. I just wish that Californians would STOP moving to Utah, now.

I started playing trombone in Jr High. In High School I had some decent talent and thought that's all you needed. I was always in or near 1st chair and didn't have to work terribly hard to be there. I got a music performance scholarship to the University of Utah. That was the real eye-opener. There were _very_ good trombone players there and they all took it very seriously and practiced a lot. That wasn't me so I was middle of the pack and didn't care to work hard enough to change the fact that I would struggle financially playing a trombone professionally as a mid-level talent.

I ended my music performance degree but stayed in the marching band and pep bands at the University of Utah. I had so much fun playing in those. I was drum major my last two years in the U's marching band.

I also was in the Phantom Regiment Drum & Bugle corps for 5 seasons. It's not trombone, so does't apply here, but shows you my commitment to marching music and interest in music entertainment. My last 2 season with Phantom Regiment I was one of the conductors as well.

After college, I played trombone in a local funk band make up mostly of high-school friends. To this day we are in a group that calls itself a half-dozen different names. We play original pirate music, have an Esquivel cover band, still play some funk, cover 80's new wave tunes with a horn section, have a disco band and a couple sets of original steam-punk stuff. We do a dozen or so shows a year, mostly during the Halloween season since we have some interesting costumes.

I'm also active playing in several community orchestras. It's just a blast to play and I will continue to do so until I can no longer lift my trombone.

My dad was a tool/mold maker so I grew up around an industrial machine shop. I enjoy building things and trombone repair has turned out to be a great deal of interest to me as well, although my dads health forced him to leave his shop and I no longer have access to a mill or lathe. I do what I can with hand tools for now.
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Doctookawalk
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« Reply #1146 on: Nov 18, 2017, 01:24PM »

Hi.  I'm Jim and I play trombone in the Saint John New Brunswick Canada Second Chance Band.   I played euphonium in Jr High and High School......over 40 years ago.   Really loving the chance to make music again and our conductor pushed me to try trombone .  I have a Jupiter slide and a Jupiter valve trombone.   In my band I am JBone but that user name is taken here! 

Happy to join this forum and read and learn.   I am considering switching to base trombone....any recommendations of what to buy? 
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Diesel B

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« Reply #1147 on: Jan 15, 2018, 12:19AM »

Hi all, Paul from Northern California.

Just bought my first trombone, a Holton Collegiate after coming from playing alto sax and bass guitar.

I played sax in elementary school. Fell in love with bass guitar and have played since high school.

I got a bug to pick up some kind of horn again. Thought about trying to get chops back up on sax again. But I guess tastes change and trombone seemed to be a natural fit, especially for being on the bass clef.  After reading so long on that scale I wanted to find something with a shorter learning curve.

I love big band, boogie woogie, bebop and the trombone gives me different side of that style. It's a fun instrument for sure.
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« Reply #1148 on: Jan 18, 2018, 06:34PM »

Not new but I might as well be...

Haven't logged on in years! Joe from Michigan. Currently teaching MS and HS band, still playing the occasional gig when I can.
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Joe Guarr
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Slavbassbone
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« Reply #1149 on: Jan 26, 2018, 08:58PM »

 Hi my name's Josh and i play bass trombone with my school band in Louisiana and I'm working towards my own bas shorn but for now I'm using a school bach 50b3 from 1978, though I've been playing for a few years on tenor on a jupiter straight horn and then a getzen f attachment
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gregs70

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« Reply #1150 on: Jan 26, 2018, 09:03PM »

Hi my name's Josh and i play bass trombone with my school band in Louisiana and I'm working towards my own bas shorn but for now I'm using a school bach 50b3 from 1978, though I've been playing for a few years on tenor on a jupiter straight horn and then a getzen f attachment

Welcome, Josh!
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« Reply #1151 on: Jan 28, 2018, 09:39AM »

 Hi all, it’s been a long time since I was here.  I played in high school, college, and community band.  I own two trombones and a euphonium.   Hi
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BGuttman
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« Reply #1152 on: Jan 28, 2018, 10:28AM »

It's been quite a while, Sandy.  Welcome back.  Also to Joe Guarr.  Always nice to see familiar old faces.
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Bruce Guttman
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« Reply #1153 on: Feb 07, 2018, 12:17PM »

 Forgive me fellers. I have a confession. I am not a trombonist, But I am interested. Can someone please tell me why it is that when you shorten the slide you start off by raising the pitch of the note sounded (C, D, E, F) but to get G you have to lengthen the tube again. Same question applies to the transition from A to B. I doesn't make sense.
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BGuttman
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« Reply #1154 on: Feb 07, 2018, 12:34PM »

Forgive me fellers. I have a confession. I am not a trombonist, But I am interested. Can someone please tell me why it is that when you shorten the slide you start off by raising the pitch of the note sounded (C, D, E, F) but to get G you have to lengthen the tube again. Same question applies to the transition from A to B. I doesn't make sense.

Actually it's quite simple.

The trombone is a tube of approximately 9 feet (2.7 meters) in length.  Its basic pitch is Bb.

The lip acts as a vibration source and the trombone resonates with different integer multiples of the fundamental wavelength.

So as we move up in pitch multiples, the notes are Bb, F, Bb, D, F, Ab, and Bb (and more).

When we select the partial for Bb (top of the bass staff) we can now lengthen the tube to get the notes A, Ab, G, Gb, F, and E (respectively).  We don't really need to use that partial for F and E since they are available in much closer positions when we are using the partial that has F on the closed tube.

I hope this makes some sense.
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Bruce Guttman
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« Reply #1155 on: Feb 14, 2018, 10:41AM »

A lot of players will wonder why I asked this question and think the answer is obvious. But I don't think it is. I know it has something to do with partials and overtones, the series of resonant frequencies in a tube, but those frequencies occur in a tube of fixed length and a trombone playing a scale has variable length. Since the lowest note in the scale is a resonant frequency of the tube why isn't this sort of thing correct all the way up as the tube's length is reduced? In other words why doesn't the trombone play all the way up the scale without lengthening the tubing as the pitch of the note increases?
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BGuttman
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« Reply #1156 on: Feb 14, 2018, 12:12PM »

Once you get above the 8th partial, the resonant frequencies of the tube get so close that you can really play a scale on just partials.  This is how a French Horn works.  The original ones had no valves and you could make minor adjustments in pitch by putting a hand in the bell and moving it around.  Trombones, trumpets, and tubas work on lower partials so we need to lengthen the tube with the valves to get notes between the partials.
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Bruce Guttman
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« Reply #1157 on: Feb 17, 2018, 06:14AM »

Once you get above the 8th partial, the resonant frequencies of the tube get so close that you can really play a scale on just partials.  This is how a French Horn works.  The original ones had no valves and you could make minor adjustments in pitch by putting a hand in the bell and moving it around.  Trombones, trumpets, and tubas work on lower partials so we need to lengthen the tube with the valves to get notes between the partials.
I'd understand this if we were talking about a fixed length tube but taking the lowest note in a scale as example, whatever the tube length happens to be. Call it L1. It can resonate several partials, I get that. But when we shorten the tube we have the same pattern again except for the actual tube length and the pitch of the note. The shorter length case is an exact model of the longer one. The new length will have the same set of partials but all will be at a correspondingly higher frequency. Why wouldn't we therefore play the same partial we were using previously for the longer tube only at a different frequency? And so on, all the way up the scale. Why therefore must we switch to another partial halfway up so to speak?
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BGuttman
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« Reply #1158 on: Feb 17, 2018, 07:12AM »

You've never had a course in Physics, I'll bet.

First, we have a tube.  The tube resonates at different frequencies.  The actual source of the vibrations is the "lip reed", caused by vibrating lips.  When we vibrate the lips at a frequency the tube resonates at, we get a proper sound.  You can actually get almost any pitch at any position but most of them won't sound very good.  An extreme case of this is when you buzz the mouthpiece since we are nowhere near where that tube resonates.

So it's possible to play all the resonances at, say, 6th position and all those notes.  But we find that playing a longer tube is harder than playing a shorter tube.  There may be a physical reason for this but take it as 500 years of experience being passed down.

There is one constant in this system.  It's called the speed of sound.  The product of the frequency and the wavelength is always the speed of sound.  Unlike the speed of light, which is generally accepted as a constant, the speed of sound can vary depending on the density of the air (in our case) which can be a function of the atmospheric pressure, temperature, moisture content, and several other factors.  The tube can resonate at an integral number of wavelengths (or half-wavelengths) only.  So each partial corresponds to a different number of wavelengths.  It's an integral series: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, etc.  Every time we double the number of wavelengths, the pitch goes up an octave.  So partials 1, 2, 4, and 8 are all octaves (Bb in 1st position: pedal, low, high, and altissimo).  3 and 6 are also octaves (F and high F).  5 is D, and 7 (poor soul) is really badly out of tune -- would have been Ab but it's way too flat to use.

Have I sufficiently confused you yet?
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Bruce Guttman
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« Reply #1159 on: Feb 17, 2018, 07:31AM »

You've never had a course in Physics, I'll bet.

Or maybe he has and that's the problem.  :)

The physics classes I had in high school and college dealt with sound and resonance in the most over-simplified and "ideal body" sort of way.

Lacehole's question and its presumptions are not unreasonable given the basics and formulas that are taught in an Intro to Physics.

Want to hear some howlers? Let a physics teacher start talking about music for a while.  Yeah, RIGHT.

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Robert Holmén

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