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The Trombone ForumHorns, Gear, and EquipmentRepairs, Modifications and Maintenance(Moderators: john sandhagen, BGuttman) interesting diagrams and instructions on care of instruments
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sly fox
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« on: Sep 10, 2011, 05:09AM »

of course, I was looking for something else, but here is what I found.  Frankly I think the diagrams with the indications of what is called what is enough to have this listed but there are also cleaning instructions and tips on figuring out problems as well.  you need to look at both, the first has info applicable to slide trombones as well.  Not sure of the original source.

http://cderksen.home.xs4all.nl/images/Art25-HowToCare-Piston.pdf

http://cderksen.home.xs4all.nl/images/Art25-HowToCare-Trombone.pdf

not sure I would follow the recommendation to use gasoline as a solvent tho, it would work, but the  fumes are highly flamable.

so TECHs what would you recommend as a substitute?
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Allen
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BGuttman
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« Reply #1 on: Sep 10, 2011, 05:17AM »

Christine Derksen is the maintainer of the Conn Loyalist site.

A lot of the pictures have been abstracted from articles that have appeared in The Instrumentalist over the years and do represent a good description of the parts.

Very useful set of documents; thanks for the post, Sly.
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Bruce Guttman
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JimArcher

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« Reply #2 on: Sep 10, 2011, 05:22AM »

It's dated by the references to oil on the slides and the T.I.S. bass.  Still good info, IMO.  I ran across a similar pub.: one of my AZ directors is a retired music prof., he wrote a text in the 50s, as I recall, that has that kind of info and detail.   
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arynearson
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« Reply #3 on: Sep 10, 2011, 07:33AM »

I think this dates it pretty well:
Quote
Avoid buffing or use of abrasives to remove discoloration, as this removes the precious protective shell of nickel or chromium and once this has worn through, it may be impossible for the duration of the war to replate.


Or is this some sort of word play that's wooshing right over my head?
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Euphanasia

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« Reply #4 on: Sep 10, 2011, 07:44AM »

I like the recommendation of mutton tallow for tuning slide grease. Mmmmm!!
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arynearson
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« Reply #5 on: Sep 10, 2011, 07:50AM »

Quote
Don't go through a revolving door, holding your case by the center handle. Carry the case
approximately parallel with your body and avoid getting one end of it caught in the door. If
you have a formed case, carry it by hugging the bell end in the crook of your arm, close to
your side.

This happens frequently enough to warrant mentioning?

Maybe revolving doors are more common elsewhere in the world-there's only one that I know of 'round these parts...
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Justin Cooper

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« Reply #6 on: Sep 10, 2011, 08:42AM »

I especially love the section under slide lubrication where the cold cream "fad" is discussed and then followed up with "Nothing...takes the place of a good trombone oil."  Good!

I would recommend against using kerosene or gasoline as solvents/cleaning solutions.  Not sure that they would necessarily damage your instrument, but you would have to clean things off really well to avoid inhaling the fumes.  I prefer de-natured alcohol for cleaning out valve casings, slide tubes, tuning slide tubes, etc.  It works well for light to moderate buildup.

There's definitely some good stuff in here, but it would also be nice to see an updated version.

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Justin Cooper
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sly fox
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« Reply #7 on: Sep 10, 2011, 10:16AM »

as far as how current some (all) of the info is, I happen to think that there is enough info to warrant posting it.

one of the things I like is the detailed diagrams, so you can determine what you may be discussing.

also some of the older methods may still be good.

as far as updating, well, that is why there are other posts more recent with advice on how to clean/maintain your trombone.

I think we should thank the person behind Connloyalist who put it on the web. I don't deserve any thanks, like I said, I was looking for something else and found this instead.

I believe she is a member of ttf as well

<and dispite any rumours to the contrary that may be out there, I did not pose for the diagram relating to the thickness of a human hair>

 Evil  :D

"That's a jokes, son" - Foghorn Leghorn
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Allen
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Justin Cooper

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« Reply #8 on: Sep 10, 2011, 03:23PM »

I agree completely, I think this is a great resource and I'm glad you posted it.  As a repair tech there are few things as frustrating as having someone try to describe a problem to you when they have no knowledge of the proper nomenclature.  The diagrams in both of these articles are very thorough.  Having these types of resources available is fantastic.

As for my earlier comments, just because certain parts of these articles are outdated doesn't mean that they aren't valuable or informative.  I was just stating my desire for a fully updated version.  I know there are several threads regarding maintenance and care, I just think it would be convenient to gave it all codified in one spot, perhaps in a downloadable .PDF like this.

Regardless, this is a great resource and my thanks go out to it's creator and to sly for posting it here. Good!

Justin
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Justin Cooper
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sly fox
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« Reply #9 on: Sep 10, 2011, 03:25PM »

 Embarrassed!  :/

although the "valve" diagram I wonder about. 

is it an f attachment tenor or as they say a bass???

it does have TIS
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Allen
First and foremost I'm a proud Dad & lucky Husband.  They say great minds can differ (not that I claim to have a great mind).  Remember that $ and my opinion buys coffee at the diner.
Justin Cooper

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« Reply #10 on: Sep 10, 2011, 04:47PM »

Embarrassed!

Didn't read that caption. :/

Looked it up on the Conn Loyalist site and these articles are from 1942, so I believe it is a bass as the caption says, although it is probably pretty close to a modern day tenor, save the TIS.  That being said I still think the nomenclature in the diagram is perfectly valid.  If someone said they were having an issue with their "rotary valve action key" I would know what they were talking about, even if that's not exactly what I would call it.

Justin
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Justin Cooper
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« Reply #11 on: Jul 28, 2013, 03:32PM »

I think this dates it pretty well:
Quote
Avoid buffing or use of abrasives to remove discoloration, as this removes the precious protective shell of nickel or chromium and once this has worn through, it may be impossible for the duration of the war to replate.

Or is this some sort of word play that's wooshing right over my head?

Yes, that was a long time ago... back when wars actually ended at some point. Yeah, RIGHT.
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Robert Holmén

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« Reply #12 on: Nov 28, 2013, 07:19AM »

Thanks for the post
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sabutin

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« Reply #13 on: Nov 28, 2013, 10:03AM »

---snip---

not sure I would follow the recommendation to use gasoline as a solvent tho, it would work, but the  fumes are highly flammable.

---snip---

I duuno about that...



Looks like fun to me!!!

S.
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Visit <http://samburtis.com/>. Lots of information on that site in the form of articles plus a link to my method book "Time, Balance & Connections-A Universal Theory Of Brass Relativity" which includes several chapters of the book.
bonearzt

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« Reply #14 on: Nov 28, 2013, 10:36AM »

Now THAT"S some hot playing!!!!  hehe

I must add that you should NEVER use a cleaning rod & cloth in the inner slide assembly!!!!!
Just too delicate & VERY easy to mis-align!


Happy Thanksgiving All!!!!


Eric
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« Reply #15 on: Nov 29, 2013, 02:49AM »

Is this a hot chem cleaning?  Yeah, RIGHT.

 Clever Remember to inhale BEFORE bringing the mouthpiece to the lips!!!

Iain
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Graham Martin
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« Reply #16 on: Nov 29, 2013, 02:40PM »

Excellent information. A set of these PDFs should be given to every student of a brass instrument. I am constantly horrified by the lack of knowledge displayed by younger folks on how to handle their horn, and how to assemble and clean it properly - not to mention the lack of hygiene. Eeek! Teachers please note!

Also some older folks never seem to have picked up on this either. Yeah, RIGHT.

I know this is an old thread but it should be revived on a regular basis. Good!
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