Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length

 
Advanced search

1087255 Posts in 72010 Topics- by 19242 Members - Latest Member: simonvd
Jump to:  
Pages: [1] 2  All   Go Down
Print
Author Topic: Best way to clean a mouthpiece?  (Read 16197 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
Bassbone4life

*
Offline Offline

Location: Orlando, Florida
Joined: Oct 21, 2011
Posts: 28

View Profile
« on: Nov 10, 2011, 01:38PM »

I have a mouthpiece that was given to me by a friend and the shank was just caked in grime and food matter I did the best I could with paper towels, soap, and hot water, but there is still a layer of nasty stuff stuck on the shank. Should I just buy a MP brush and scrub the junk out of it or does any one have any suggestions?
Logged
BGuttman
Mad Chemist

*
*
Offline Offline

Location: Londonderry, NH, USA
Joined: Dec 12, 2000
Posts: 51143
"Almost Professional"


View Profile
« Reply #1 on: Nov 10, 2011, 01:45PM »

A soak in hot water with some dish detergent works well.  Overnight if it's really cruddy.  Not getting touched?  Try something like Simple Green.

If you have a dishwasher, you could put it through a cycle.  Put it on one of the tines for holding plates in place.

You can use a mouthpiece brush, but I have had good success with a baby bottle nipple brush.  It also gets in there.

Good luck.
Logged

Bruce Guttman
Solo Trombone, Hollis Town Band
Merrimack Valley Philharmonic Orch. President 2017-2018
Scooter

*
Offline Offline

Location: Calabasas, California
Joined: Aug 1, 2011
Posts: 102

View Profile WWW
« Reply #2 on: Nov 10, 2011, 01:47PM »

I have a mouthpiece that was given to me by a friend and the shank was just caked in grime and food matter I did the best I could with paper towels, soap, and hot water, but there is still a layer of nasty stuff stuck on the shank. Should I just buy a MP brush and scrub the junk out of it or does any one have any suggestions?

I recommend that you soak it in soapy warm water.  Defintely use a mouthpiece brush.  I have also gotten great results from using a gentle non-abrasive silver polish cream. (About $5 at a hardware store)

I just received a vintage horn today with an in tact old mouth piece.  I kid you not--- it looks like the guy ate caramels in 1951, played the trombone a bunch---then stuck the horn and mouthpiece in the closet for 60 years!  [Mouthpiece is soaking now . . . . Yuk!] :-0
Logged
bonearzt

*
Offline Offline

Location: Denton-Dallas/Ft.Worth TX
Joined: Oct 23, 2004
Posts: 4108
"UTEP Alumni/Legend in my own mind!"


View Profile WWW
« Reply #3 on: Nov 10, 2011, 02:39PM »

HOT soapy water should dissolve the gunk,  and a follow up with the brush.
You can also use a disinfectant mouthwash like Listerene or Scope as an added cleaning,  but be sure to rinse well with hot water.

DO NOT use bleach!!!!!!  That will trash the silver in a big hurry!!

I don't recommend the dishwasher route,  that detergent is too harsh and sometimes contains pumice which will damage the finish.

The mouthpiece is the only thing on the horn you can and SHOULD clean with HOT HOT HOT soapy water on a REGULAR basis.

Thanks!

Eric

Logged

Eric, Leandra, Sara, Jared & Lily
Edwards
"The bitterness of poor quality remains long after the sweetness of low price has faded!"
"If you're doing something a certain way ONLY because it's always been done that way,  you're probably doing it wrong!"
John Beers Jr.

*
Offline Offline

Location: Houston, TX
Joined: Dec 8, 2002
Posts: 3528

View Profile
« Reply #4 on: Nov 10, 2011, 03:16PM »

Eric,

How do you go about polishing a mouthpiece out of curiosity? My Greg Black (like many Greg Blacks I've seen and some of the older Schilkes, I think it has something to do with the very high quality of the silver plating) has started to go a bit black, but I dislike the idea of A. taking material off of the mouthpiece that I love so dearly already, and B. putting abrasive chemicals where I put my mouth.

Should I just leave it as is?
Logged

"Progress is just another word for making bad things happen faster" - Granny Weatherwax
BassBoneFL

*
Offline Offline

Location: Tampa/St.Petersburg,FL
Joined: Aug 31, 2005
Posts: 2267

View Profile
« Reply #5 on: Nov 10, 2011, 03:35PM »

I've found tooth paste to be a good mouthpiece cleaner. It removes gunk and tarnish. One probably shouldn't rub too vigorously on the exterior as tooth paste is a mild abrasive.... and it leaves your mouthpiece 'minty fresh'. :D
Logged

Harold Van Schaik
Bass Trombone
The Florida Orchestra

S.E. Shires Artist

"Having Yo-Yo Ma give a masterclass to brass players is like hiring Picasso to paint your garage." - Gene Pokorny
daveyboy37

*
Offline Offline

Location: New Jersey, USA
Joined: Nov 24, 2005
Posts: 4400

View Profile
« Reply #6 on: Nov 13, 2011, 05:37PM »

If you've got an ultrasonic jewelry cleaner, that should work well.

Or just a nice long soak in water with soap to help loosen the grime.

Another good thing to do is rinse out your mouthpiece, brush out the backbore, and dry it off EVERY time you put it away. That should prevent gunk from ever building up in the first place.

Also, as always, make sure you have brushed your teeth well since the last time you ate before you use your horn. Lots of food matter ends up stuck in your mouth and when you play, some will end up going into the mouthpiece, and then into the horn, where it helps those lovely nasty deposits in your slide grow faster.
Logged

David Sullivan
Bass Trombone - Livingston Symphony Orchestra
Horns: Bach 39, King 3B, Yamaha YSL-640, Bach 42T, Kanstul 1570CR, Kanstul 1588CR, Yamaha YBL-612RII
MPCS: Faxx 7C, Hammond 11ML, Laskey 59MD, Laskey 85MD.
DaveBb
*
Offline Offline

Location: New Zealand
Joined: Jun 1, 2010
Posts: 489

View Profile
« Reply #7 on: Nov 13, 2011, 06:04PM »

For silver-plate:

Hagerty Silver Foam seems to do the job well but is a lot gentler than other silver cleaners like Goddard's liquid or silver cloth.  It cleans up the surface without generating a lot of black residue which I think is the indicator of surface loss.

http://hagertyusa.com/silver/products/silver_foam.htm

It doesn't smell as unpleasant or as strongly as the more aggressive products.  A quick rinse with some dishwash detergent and then clean water, then I can't smell or taste it on the mouthpiece.


Dave





Logged
mgladdish
*
Offline Offline

Location:
Joined: Aug 4, 2017
Posts: 8

View Profile
« Reply #8 on: Aug 19, 2017, 09:29AM »

Don't know quite what the etiquette is here with bumping old threads, but does anyone have any advice on how to get this any more clean?



This is after I soaked it in boiling soapy water for 36 hours, then scrubbed it with a stiff brush and toothpaste.

What should I try next?
Logged
Matt K

*
*
Offline Offline

Location:
Joined: May 6, 2010
Posts: 7185

View Profile
« Reply #9 on: Aug 19, 2017, 09:42AM »

 Eeek!  Probably an exorcism!
Logged

What's in a name? that which we call a tenor-bass posaune
By any other name would smell as sweet;
Geezerhorn

*
Offline Offline

Location: PA
Joined: Feb 9, 2012
Posts: 5557
"Lego My Trombone"


View Profile
« Reply #10 on: Aug 19, 2017, 10:35AM »

I wonder what the techs will think of this: I soaked one like that in CLR and it dissolved all the mineral deposit build-ups. Then I washed it with hot soapy water and shined the mpc with some Wright's Polish. It didn't apparently hurt the mpc in any way that I could tell. Techs?

...Geezer
Logged
sabutin

*
Offline Offline

Location: NYC
Joined: Sep 26, 2005
Posts: 5423
"A professional freelance NYC lower brass player."


View Profile WWW
« Reply #11 on: Aug 19, 2017, 10:50AM »

Don't know quite what the etiquette is here with bumping old threads, but does anyone have any advice on how to get this any more clean?



This is after I soaked it in boiling soapy water for 36 hours, then scrubbed it with a stiff brush and toothpaste.

What should I try next?

You could try a metal cleaner of some sort...silver cleaner if it's plated. (Remember to thoroughly clean out the chemical residue...I'd put it in a dishwasher myself.) If that doesn't work, it's probably corrosion. You could have a brass tech buff/chem-clean it, of course...it might ruin the m'pce, but on the other hand, it might make it better. Who ever really knows with these sorts of things until they're done?

Not me... :/ :/ :/

S.
Logged

Visit <http://samburtis.com/>. Lots of information on that site in the form of articles plus a link to my method book "Time, Balance & Connections-A Universal Theory Of Brass Relativity" which includes several chapters of the book.
oslide

*
Offline Offline

Location: Switzerland
Joined: Jul 3, 2005
Posts: 322

View Profile
« Reply #12 on: Aug 19, 2017, 11:11AM »

I'd
|: deep freeze it and throw it into boiling water :|
Perhaps repeated temperature shocks will help destroy the incrustation.
Logged
Full Pedal Trombonist

*
Offline Offline

Location:
Joined: Jun 16, 2009
Posts: 2983

View Profile
« Reply #13 on: Aug 19, 2017, 01:43PM »

I don't know how mouthpieces get this bad. Or what gets in there that can't be dissolved by boiling water and soaking for 36 hours. Try metal polish, rubber gloves, and the hottest water you can handle while brushing out the inside with a mpc brush. And lots of elbow grease. If you have CLR go that route, too. As long as you can put it on your face and not get a bad reaction after and you can polish the finish back to how it should be I can't see the harm.
Logged

We don't just embrace insanity here, we feel it up, french kiss it and then buy it a drink.
norbie2009

*
Offline Offline

Location:
Joined: May 12, 2009
Posts: 196

View Profile
« Reply #14 on: Aug 19, 2017, 02:02PM »

Eric,

How do you go about polishing a mouthpiece out of curiosity? My Greg Black (like many Greg Blacks I've seen and some of the older Schilkes, I think it has something to do with the very high quality of the silver plating) has started to go a bit black, but I dislike the idea of A. taking material off of the mouthpiece that I love so dearly already, and B. putting abrasive chemicals where I put my mouth.

Should I just leave it as is?

I use a Blitz silver polishing cloth. It has an inner and outer cloth sewed together. You rub the silver with the inner and then polish it with the outer. No nasty residue left over either. It works like a charm!
Logged

Still, the only certain thing for sure is what I do not know. -Lyle Lovett
ChadA
*
Online Online

Location: Ohio
Joined: Jul 16, 2010
Posts: 317

View Profile WWW
« Reply #15 on: Aug 19, 2017, 02:18PM »

For completely non-abrasive polishing, I've done the tinfoil/baking soda/salt/boiling water thing.  You can google and find many versions of how-to's.  Of course, thoroughly rinse everything when you're done.
Logged

Chad Arnow, DMA
Bass Trombone, Dayton Philharmonic Orchestra
Assistant Professor of Trombone, University of Dayton
http://chadarnow.com/
http://go.udayton.edu/music
mgladdish
*
Offline Offline

Location:
Joined: Aug 4, 2017
Posts: 8

View Profile
« Reply #16 on: Aug 21, 2017, 12:27AM »

I wonder what the techs will think of this: I soaked one like that in CLR and it dissolved all the mineral deposit build-ups. Then I washed it with hot soapy water and shined the mpc with some Wright's Polish. It didn't apparently hurt the mpc in any way that I could tell. Techs?

...Geezer

That sounds like the next thing to try.

What's CLR?
Logged
Geezerhorn

*
Offline Offline

Location: PA
Joined: Feb 9, 2012
Posts: 5557
"Lego My Trombone"


View Profile
« Reply #17 on: Aug 21, 2017, 04:19AM »

That sounds like the next thing to try.

What's CLR?

Available basically everywhere in the US. It's a somewhat caustic lime and scale remover solution, considered safe enough to sell over-the-counter in supermarkets, big-box stores, etc. I filled up a glass jar with it, dropped the mpc into it and watched it fizzle a little as it neutralized the lime/scale deposit build-ups inside the stem. It didn't seem to hurt my mpc, but I would advise trying it on a very used one that you could stand to lose to see if it reacts with the metal in any way.

I'm thinking this stuff is basically the same stuff techs use when they do a "chemical flush". Uh-oh. Did I just let the cat out of the bag? lol

I am also very careful to thoroughly wash the mpc off with hot, soapy water afterwards as well, so there won't be any fear of it chaffing my chops and to get the yucky smell off it.

I use it in my bathroom all the time to remove lime/scale build-up from around the tub faucet, etc.

...Geezer
Logged
mgladdish
*
Offline Offline

Location:
Joined: Aug 4, 2017
Posts: 8

View Profile
« Reply #18 on: Aug 22, 2017, 12:21PM »

Available basically everywhere in the US. It's a somewhat caustic lime and scale remover solution, considered safe enough to sell over-the-counter in supermarkets, big-box stores, etc. I filled up a glass jar with it, dropped the mpc into it and watched it fizzle a little as it neutralized the lime/scale deposit build-ups inside the stem. It didn't seem to hurt my mpc, but I would advise trying it on a very used one that you could stand to lose to see if it reacts with the metal in any way.

I'm thinking this stuff is basically the same stuff techs use when they do a "chemical flush". Uh-oh. Did I just let the cat out of the bag? lol

I am also very careful to thoroughly wash the mpc off with hot, soapy water afterwards as well, so there won't be any fear of it chaffing my chops and to get the yucky smell off it.

I use it in my bathroom all the time to remove lime/scale build-up from around the tub faucet, etc.

...Geezer

I guess any old limescale remover will do, then. But first I'll need a backup mouthpiece just in case it all goes wrong (yes, I've got this far with only owning the one mouthpiece that came with the trombone when I bought it).
Logged
timothy42b
*
Offline Offline

Location: Colonial Heights, Virginia, US
Joined: Dec 7, 2000
Posts: 12307

View Profile
« Reply #19 on: Aug 22, 2017, 01:15PM »



I'm thinking this stuff is basically the same stuff techs use when they do a "chemical flush". Uh-oh. Did I just let the cat out of the bag? lol
 

...Geezer

It is, but they dilute it very precisely and also time the exposure.  I suspect if you left a mouthpiece in there too long it would dissolve.
Logged

Tim Richardson
Pages: [1] 2  All   Go Up
Print
Jump to: