Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length

 
Advanced search

1092893 Posts in 72336 Topics- by 19432 Members - Latest Member: joshealejo
Jump to:  
The Trombone ForumTeaching & LearningPractice Room(Moderator: blast) Hybrid Crossover Mouthpiece
Pages: [1]   Go Down
Print
Author Topic: Hybrid Crossover Mouthpiece  (Read 3435 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
Flakey
*
Offline Offline

Location: London England
Joined: May 4, 2006
Posts: 173

View Profile
« on: May 05, 2012, 02:02PM »

Bought one of these mouthpieces recently. I got a trumpet and cornet shank too. I have been using my daughters old cornet (an Olds Special...nice horn) and I have to say it makes a nice change from practicing the trombone. Because there is so much more back pressure and you have to you use loads of breath support, when I go back to my trombone it has quite some benefit!!

I originally got the mouthpiece so I could practice getting my valve work up to speed and be able to take a small horn away on holiday rather than a trombone, to keep my chops in shape. It appeals to me that I could do the odd simple song on flugel (another instrument of my daughters) too from time to time.  Denis Wick in the bible (the Denis Wick Trombone Technique)....everyone should have a copy....says it is good for your trombone playing to pick up something different from time to time like a euphonium as it makes you work your chops. I am definitely finding this with the hybrid mouthpiece and the cornet. Even if I never do a gig on it I am convinced that the extra effort I am having to use is helping my trombone playing!!


Logged

"Its better than working"
CSO

*
Offline Offline

Location: Washington, DC
Joined: Jan 22, 2007
Posts: 26

View Profile
« Reply #1 on: May 10, 2012, 01:29PM »

Which size did you get?  Also, do you think the average audience member would be able to tell this mouthpiece is a little different than the other trumpet players?
Logged

"Tone quality is earned. It's not part of the purchase price of ANY bass trombone."  - Mike Suter
Exzaclee

*
Offline Offline

Location: Edmond, OK
Joined: Mar 8, 2008
Posts: 6590
"Check out my new website!"


View Profile
« Reply #2 on: May 10, 2012, 01:57PM »

Depends.

Playing one in tune on a trumpet takes a lot of work... it's not like playing a trombone, it's not like playing a trumpet.  Seriously, it's a lot of work.  You won't just plug one into a trumpet and find your doubling issues are solved.

You'll have to work on it just like anything else.  It's for guys that have a real problem with playing on small pieces.

It still sounds like a trumpet, though.
Logged

Music is my mistress, and she plays second fiddle to no one!
www.zacleemusic.com
JGordon

*
Offline Offline

Location: Boulder, CO
Joined: Jun 23, 2011
Posts: 77

View Profile
« Reply #3 on: May 10, 2012, 03:06PM »


I got one of these too.  I was at a concert by Wycliffe Gordon and noticed that he was using one and sounded great on a trumpet.  Of course, he also sounded great on a slide trumpet, trombone, bass, piano and drums that day.  Then he played his Sousaphone! 

I had one of my father's old trumpets and I really couldn't do much with it using a trumpet mouthpiece, so I got on Wycliffe's site and was re-directed to http://www.chasonsmusic.com/home.cfm, where I was able to purchase a hybrid mouthpiece endorsed by Wycliffe Gordon.  While Chansons sells similar mouthpieces with changeable shanks, so one could use them also on a cornet or flugelhorn, the one I bought has a fixed shank.

My experience was similar to the one noted above.  I had to go to work with the mouthpiece.  After using it a while, I can now play tunes and sound like a trumpet player -- within reason.  My range on the mouthpiece is not terrific for a trumpet player.  I can play up to about a high C (the one a couple of ledger lines above the treble clef) but while I can hit that note, it is not particularly strong and I get tired playing in that range.  Most real trumpet players can play substantially higher than what I can do and have substantially more endurance.  Still, I have enough range to play some tunes and fondly remember the great sounds my father was able to make with this horn.

Other trombone players who want to double just learn to do it on a trumpet mouthpiece.  But I was struggling with that.  So, I got this hybrid and I am having a good time playing with it.  I have not, however, considered playing trumpet in public.   
Logged
Flakey
*
Offline Offline

Location: London England
Joined: May 4, 2006
Posts: 173

View Profile
« Reply #4 on: May 11, 2012, 02:43AM »

As Exackly says, you have to work on it. Don't expect to suddenly get called for trumpet gigs!! The range definitely is reduced. I too can get up to a high C but feel more comfortable up to a G (our F) sitting on two ledger lines. As I said, the benefit of it is the effect it is having on my trombone playing. My chops are starting to feel a little more focused from the concentrated practice on the hybrid.
Logged

"Its better than working"
fluor

*
Offline Offline

Location: norway
Joined: Oct 3, 2005
Posts: 1021

View Profile
« Reply #5 on: May 11, 2012, 04:35AM »

I am intrigued by the possibility to double on horn, but the company says the tone isn't especially horn-y... What if one could double on horn on theatre gigs with this? I sure can't play a normal horn mouthpiece...
Logged
Matt K

*
*
Offline Offline

Location:
Joined: May 6, 2010
Posts: 7256

View Profile
« Reply #6 on: May 11, 2012, 05:02AM »

Trumpet shanks are too large for horns. You'd need a horn shank for that to work, and I'm not entirely sure that would work at all... Horn mouthpieces aren't as similar as trumpet/trombone as far as I can tell.
Logged

What's in a name? that which we call a tenor-bass posaune
By any other name would smell as sweet;
Exzaclee

*
Offline Offline

Location: Edmond, OK
Joined: Mar 8, 2008
Posts: 6590
"Check out my new website!"


View Profile
« Reply #7 on: May 11, 2012, 07:19AM »

They make them for Horns too, Matt.
Logged

Music is my mistress, and she plays second fiddle to no one!
www.zacleemusic.com
Matt K

*
*
Offline Offline

Location:
Joined: May 6, 2010
Posts: 7256

View Profile
« Reply #8 on: May 11, 2012, 07:27AM »

Ah I stand corrected  Eeek!

I can't imagine that sounds good, but the closest I've came is using my alto sacbut shank on a trumpet which was surprisingly not bad... other than making me super flat.
Logged

What's in a name? that which we call a tenor-bass posaune
By any other name would smell as sweet;
MikeBMiller
Best trombone player on my street.
*
Offline Offline

Location:
Joined: Sep 18, 2009
Posts: 1161

View Profile
« Reply #9 on: Dec 20, 2017, 01:49PM »

I know this is an old thread, but I just got a $40 trumpet off of CL and one of those $200 Wycliffe mouthpieces. I have never had much luck playing trumpet with a trumpet piece, but I can get a decent sound with this thing. My range for now tops out at a high G (F on bone). I am hoping that will improve with time and practice. Maybe after playing this for a while I can try to use a regular trumpet piece. I don't see myself getting any trumpet gigs soon, but it is nice to try something new for a change.
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
Print
Jump to: