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Author Topic: Trombone High Notes  (Read 1340 times)
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Derek13
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« on: May 27, 2012, 07:40PM »

I've been playing trombone since August of 2010. Recently I learned Bb second octaves. I can play up to the high high A but when I get to the Bb it kinda wavers in sound. How can I improve my sound on high notes? 
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Matt K

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« Reply #1 on: May 27, 2012, 08:12PM »

First:

Find a teacher who knows enough to tell if you are doing the right things with your embouchure.

Secondly:

Play.  I've found that after doing even the most rigorous of routines for a long time, comparatively... nothing helps my high chops more than just playing through etudes for an hour or two a day. 

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What's in a name? that which we call a tenor-bass posaune
By any other name would smell as sweet;
Derek13
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« Reply #2 on: May 27, 2012, 08:18PM »

I have two but ones a school teacher who I don't know how to contact. The others a high school student I don't want to disturb they're summer. But I'll see if he can help.

Thanks for the tip on etudes will have to find me some
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BGuttman
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« Reply #3 on: May 27, 2012, 08:25PM »

First get this:

http://tromboneforum.org/index.php/topic,62067.0.html

Then do a little searching on "range building" (or rangebuilding).  We must have DOZENS of threads with almost the same suggestions.
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Bruce Guttman
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Matt K

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« Reply #4 on: May 27, 2012, 08:39PM »

What state are you located in?  People on the forums can point you in the right direction.  If you're anywhere near Maryland, Doug Elliott wholeheartedly gets my endorsement. 
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What's in a name? that which we call a tenor-bass posaune
By any other name would smell as sweet;
TromboneMarie97

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« Reply #5 on: May 28, 2012, 02:00AM »

Every day I play glissando upwards from    and I go as high as I possibly can. I have done this as long as I remember (I am 15 now) and I have never had trouble with high notes. If you do this every day you will get better, but make sure you have a good sound all the time, if not I don't think it will help. Now I can go up to c3in a good day  :D
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Derek13
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« Reply #6 on: May 28, 2012, 05:55AM »

Thanks for all the help. I've never seen a remigton like that so I'll have to try it.
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Schwalbz

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« Reply #7 on: May 29, 2012, 09:00PM »

I am also a younger trombonist (A Junior in highschool), and I know what you're going through ha!

I always had trouble playing high.  But after about a year of doing the same routine, my flexibility is probably my greatest attribute in my playing.

I what I did was I just did simple arpeggios starting on Low E 
I would do this starting with just two octaves up to the two ledger line E.  Tenor Clef
now once I felt comfortable enough to go to the G#, I would for it!  It started out pretty bad.  But got consistently better. and before I knew it.  High B naturals  Alto Clef felt very natural!

Now start on the Low E and do Major, and minor.  Once those are solid try also doing,  Major 4 arpeggios and Minor 4 arpeggios.  and once those are good! go for Diminished and augmented arpeggios.  And soon you will be able to do them all!.  I would each of these starting on the low E on a set embouchure with a constant air stream go up as high as I could play and would often try to go as low as I could on a set embouchure as well.  Then I would Do F then F# and so on up to Bb..  This is just how I PERSONALLY improved my range, i've had a handful of people confront me saying that that is exactly how people damage their embouchure.  But I obviously disagree.  Give it a try!
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Eat, Sleep, Trombone
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« Reply #8 on: May 30, 2012, 08:17PM »

The reason it didn't damage your chops is because you were most likely doing it correctly.

Rangebuilding can be great if your doing it right, but very harmful if you are doing it wrong. The only way to know if you are doing it the right way is to get a teacher that knows what they are talking about. Also, the rule of thumb "If it hurts, stop." is a great one to follow.

Have fun.  :)

http://www.joedixonstudio.com/downloads.html

Check out this site. Mr. Dixon is a master brass pedagogue. His exercises have helped my playing immensely (so have his masterclasses...I'm such a lucky guy  Pant ) anyway, try his upper register rangebuilding exercises, and after ya think that's easy, try the Upper register tuning exercises and major+minor calisthenics. If your chops aren't finished (and believe me....you will need to rest when doing rangebuilding), then try his alto trombone calisthenics (yes, on tenor)

I'm still going through these things...I suspect I always will be using these to improve my own playing....they work.
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