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Author Topic: Reading Room  (Read 12272 times)
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RedHotMama
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« Reply #20 on: Oct 09, 2013, 03:21AM »

I read that recently. Probably my favorite King novel overall.

I haven't come across that one. Seems worth hunting up!

My favourite King to date is The Stand, his apocryphal novel about a post-plague world. There are two versions, one of which is the author's equivalent of the "director's cut", which is the version I prefer (and obviously so does the author!). However, this makes an already long novel even longer. It's enormous.... Eeek!

Odd, though. In the version which was first published (the shorter version, as decreed by the publishers), the original ending was omitted. You'd think an author might object to that!
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Christine (red hot - that's what!)
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« Reply #21 on: Oct 09, 2013, 04:24AM »

I've not been able to get on with King, for a couple reasons (none of which I expect would sway anyone away from his writing).

I recently read The Foundation series by Asimov. All the way through I was thinking "I should be bored by this", but I kept turning the pages. It really is an incredibly slow series, and I'm still not sure why I found it palatable.

I guess if I would have to pick a favorite author it would be Vonnegut. Player Piano is my favorite book title (having favorite books is so passé). This might be because when I started reading the book I didn't know what a player piano was, and when I found out I thought there could be no better title considering the theme of the book. I don't know how the title is experienced by a native speaker.
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RedHotMama
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« Reply #22 on: Oct 09, 2013, 05:03AM »

I'm not a big fan of Asimov. I read the Foundation series many years ago, but it's set too far in the future for my taste. And he does go on a bit....

My least favourite SF author is Arthur C Clarke, who I know is extremely popular. It's just that he spends so much time showing off his knowledge of science and I'm thinking, get ON with it!!!
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Christine (red hot - that's what!)
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« Reply #23 on: Nov 03, 2013, 01:09PM »

I'm going to come out and say T.H. White's "The Winter King" it's a great interpretation of the Arthurian legend and really deals with the character of King Arthur as a person than a mythical being who could do no wrong.

And of course any of Tolkien's books relating to Middle Earth are a blast, I'm working my way through LOTR again and it's just as engrossing as I remember.
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bhcordova
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« Reply #24 on: Nov 15, 2013, 12:23PM »

I'm currently reading Quo Vadis.  It offers a realistic view of the Roman life under Nero.
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Billy Cordova, MBA
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Andrew Meronek

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« Reply #25 on: Nov 15, 2013, 03:02PM »

I've gotten into nonfiction a lot lately. Currently, I'm making my way through "The Better Angels Of Our Nature: Why Violence Has Declined" by Steven Pinker. I enjoyed the other book of his enough, I decided to give this one a try. So far, it's pretty darn good. It's incredibly well-researched and offers a very interesting and nonstandard way of looking at history.

The latest fiction books I've gotten into is Jim Butcher's Dresden series. I think it's considered one of the best "urban fantasy" style series out there.
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« Reply #26 on: Nov 15, 2013, 08:16PM »

I'm reading another Oliver Sachs book, this time it's Awakenings.  Very interesting. 
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Tim Richardson
garrymcl
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« Reply #27 on: Oct 16, 2014, 08:45PM »

I like Robert Ruark, Hemingway, Raymond Chanler ( my 6th cousin), and of course my own books.

Garry-
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Martin Trombone have owned since 1950
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« Reply #28 on: Oct 17, 2014, 08:20AM »

"Adventures of Huckleberry Finn" is the novel I've most enjoyed reading. I loved the way Twain evokes the setting of the mostly undeveloped river and the people who live around it.
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Robert Holmén

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« Reply #29 on: Oct 17, 2014, 09:00AM »

I've been reading more fiction lately, but I did just finish
http://www.amazon.com/Faraday-Maxwell-Electromagnetic-Field-Revolutionized/dp/1616149426

It continues to amaze me how the scientific pioneers figured out so much with the absence of the modern tools (not just computers and lab instruments, but basic calculus, etc.) we take for granted.

Faraday and Maxwell are an interesting contrast.  Faraday did the experiments that laid the basis for our modern understanding of electricity but he lacked the math skills to develop them into a theory.  Maxwell laid the mathematical groundwork over a long period of time and established the nature of electricity through equations. 

By the way, are any of you on Shelfari?  One of my kids insisted I get an account, and I now track all my reading there.
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Tim Richardson
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« Reply #30 on: Nov 09, 2014, 07:07PM »

If you have Kindle you can get my book .... those that have read tell me it is good and has a good story line ... I haven't published it in book form yet as it is much more expensive and time consuming. If you don't have a kindle you can download a FREE program from my page and read it on the computer or other device. It is an adventure w/ political overtones, and show how easy it would be to conquer and lock up everyone in the USA, with them almost begging you to do so. I write in an old style of the 30s and 40s ... but moves right along. No sex, no drugs and very little booze. has a military tone to it. And if nothing else it tells you what the government can do to you ... if they so desire.

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00O3V6TOI

My favorite line from Hemingway came when he delivered "The Old Man and the Sea" to his publisher. The publisher read through it and called him, saying, "you need to change a bunch of things it your book". Hemingway responded, " Like hell I will, you are the only publisher around." And the book was published the way it was written.

Garry-
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Martin Trombone have owned since 1950
3 Yamahas: 200, 354, & 445
2 Getzens: 351 & 451
Several: Bachs, Conns, Kings, Bundy, Selmer, & half doz or so old collector horns
Graham Martin
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« Reply #31 on: Dec 05, 2014, 09:16PM »

I have to confess that I do not read many books these days, other than for reference purposes. However, I recently came across a book sale at a local retail centre where a huge stock of new books was available at $2 each. It seems to me that the publishers must be in a lot of trouble if they have to dump them at such a low price.

The $2 book that caught my attention was “Anyone Who Had A Heart”, My Life and Music, Burt Bacharach - actually put together by Robert Greenfield using various sources, but it is largely the memoirs of Burt himself. A lot of the content is written by his ex-wives, lyric writers, musicians and other workmates. The date of publishing is 2013, so it is not as though it is an old book.

I love Burt’s tunes; largely because they have such distinctive melodies, a sometimes different form to the norm, interesting progressions and different rhythms. Also of course he worked with some of the best-ever lyric writers: Hal David, Bob Hilliard, Carole Bayer Sager, Elvis Costello,

Some of the best ones were huge hits in the UK in the 1950s and 1960s; and sung by the pop stars of those days, notably Perry Como, Frankie Vaughan, Dionne Warwick, The Beatles, Gene Pitney, Cilla Black and Dusty Springfield, Jack Jones, Sandie Shaw, Tom Jones and Herb Alpert. That is not to say there were not many other distinguished performers and that he did not write some good tunes later. But the 60s in the UK, mainly recorded by Brits are what I appreciate most:

Singles
"Magic Moments”
"Tower of Strength"
"Baby It's You"
"Only Love Can Break a Heart"
"Don't Make Me Over"
"Make It Easy on Yourself”
"Twenty Four Hours from Tulsa"
"Anyone Who Had a Heart"
"(They Long to Be) Close to You"
"Wives and Lovers"
"Wishin' and Hopin”
"Walk On By"
"I Just Don't Know What to Do with Myself"
"(There's) Always Something There to Remind Me”
"You'll Never Get to Heaven"
"What the World Needs Now Is Love"
"What's New Pussycat?"
"Here I Am"
"Promise Her Anything"
"Trains and Boats and Planes"
"My Little Red Book"
"I Say a Little Prayer"
"The Look of Love"
"Casino Royale"
"This Guy's in Love with You"
"Raindrops Keep Fallin' on My Head"
"I'll Never Fall in Love Again"

If you want a comprehensive list of the tunes he wrote, when he wrote them, by whom they were recorded, and where they got to in the various hit charts around the world, go to:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Burt_Bacharach

That is enough about the tunes because, although I thought I would be less interested in his personal life, he certainly lived through some highs and lows whilst married to Paula Stewart, Angie Dickinson, Carole Bayer Sager and Jane Hanson. At first he worked basically as a pianist and music director for Vic Damone and Marlene Dietrich, before concentrating on the song writing.

Although he always tries to appear the ‘nice guy’, I sometimes get the impression he was not always quite that to his family and associates and maybe he is/was a bit full of himself. On the other hand it was probably his work ethic that often got in the way of family and other relationships. It is difficult to say. What can you say bad about a guy who fell in love with music after sneaking into a Manhattan jazz club to see the legendary Dizzy Gillespie?

The book is an interesting read, particularly for musicians, and I recommend it. After a bout of pneumonia and a long recovery period, Burt said this about song writing - but it applies equally to playing:

“What I learned was that the longer you stay away from your craft, the harder it is to re-enter. What I Would say to people who write music is that if you stop for a while and think you can pick it up again anytime you like, it’s really not that easy. There is something to be said for going to your piano or guitar every day, even if you don’t write anything, just so you can keep in touch with your music. If you do that, there will be days when something magical happens, but you have to do it on a daily basis.”
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Grah

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May your wishes all come true
May you always do for others
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May you build a ladder to the stars
And climb on every rung
May you stay......forever young."
Ellrod

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« Reply #32 on: Dec 05, 2014, 10:19PM »

I find I don't have time, or my eyesight is crap, or the light is bad, etc.

I feel as if life is a re-write of Catch 22. I expect I'm Major Major. "Some men are born mediocre, some men achieve mediocrity, and some men have mediocrity thrust upon them. With Major Major it had been all three." I do not, however, resemble Henry Fonda.
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MikeBMiller
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« Reply #33 on: Feb 03, 2015, 02:18PM »

In the past year, I read the whole Fire and Ice series on my Kindle app. Close to 5,000 pages. And only about half of it was very interesting. Mr. Martin never uses one word when 5 will do. It's a great story though, and I hope he eventually finishes the darn thing.

Other good reads lately - The Guns of August - The story of the run up to WW I and the first month of the war. Hellhound on his Trail by Hampton Sides - a fascinating account of the MLK assasination and how the James Earl Ray almost got away with it and ended up in Africa. He was arrested in London trying to board a plane with a gun. The Martian by Andy Wier. An astronaut gets accidentally left on Mars and has to fend for himself while NASA tries to figure out how to rescue him.
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