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The Trombone ForumHorns, Gear, and EquipmentMouthpieces(Moderators: BGuttman, Doug Elliott) Zottola Mouthpiece - anybody know about them ???
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Dukesboneman

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« on: Sep 25, 2012, 03:02PM »

I just came into possesion of a Zottola trombone mouthpiece. It`s in great shape but all the plating is gone.
The writing is as follows

"Zottola"
   96B
    Z

Port Chester
New York

I remember these being advertised years ago in the Union paper but never bought one or ran into anyone that used one.
Anyone have any info on these or this model at all.
Thanks,
Dave
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Brass Menagerie

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« Reply #1 on: Sep 25, 2012, 03:08PM »

I saw a 90 or 90B on eBay. Said it has a "stepped back bore" that Zottola was famous for. No experience playing them, though...
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hassein
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« Reply #2 on: Sep 25, 2012, 08:19PM »

Frank Zottola lived in Port Chester NY. He had a shop behind his house where he filled orders for mouthpieces from all over. He would have a picture(hand drawn by him with the name of the person and the specs) hanging on a clothesline type setup hanging from lyres. He designed the so called "step" backbore,which he said came to him while watching water accelerate over rocks in a brook(I'm serious). I would take vintage mouthpieces to him to fix and prepare for plating. If you went in person,it was a real treat. It usually involved pizza and a lot of stories. He always did excellent work and would be happy to have you watch over his shoulder. All of his plating was done by Artcraft Silversmiths in Mount Vernon,NY,the same place used by Bach when they were there. He is survived by two trumpet playing sons-Glenn and Bob.
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Euphanasia

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« Reply #3 on: Sep 25, 2012, 08:22PM »

I've owned a couple. They're interesting at first, but I never found myself going back to one. They do seem to have a nice high range and no real negative characteristics, but I don't think the stepped backbore does much at all.
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Stewbones43

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« Reply #4 on: Sep 26, 2012, 01:07AM »

Here is a link to them  http://users.rcn.com/rakright/

I use a 93B in a Blues/Soul/Disco band I play in where I have taken over from the 2nd trumpet player. I read transposing treble clef so there is no problem with the part but I try to put as much as I can up the octave so that the voicing is the the same as the original. I play up to super F fairly happily. The gigs are either 2x60 minute sets with a 30 minute break or 1x90 minute set and the music is played non-stop. The mouthpiece works very well and is bright enough to hold its own with a line up of trumpet, tenor and bari' saxes, guitar, keyboard, bass guitar, drums and 4 vocalists. We are a LOUD :-0 Evil band!
So far the mouthpiece has proved to be the best in my considerable arsenal, so I can highly recommend it. The rim is comfortable and the sound suits the type of gig I use it for (not sure whether that is a recommendation or not! :/ ) I agree with Euphanasia about the merits of the stepped backbore but "If it works, don't fix it"

Cheers

Stewbones
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Trombone means big trumpet-does that mean it is louder?
BobM
« Reply #5 on: Sep 27, 2012, 03:09AM »

I had one years ago, very popular on Trumpets at the time, a "fat" rather than broad tone, as I remember.

Bob M.
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Stewbones43

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« Reply #6 on: Sep 27, 2012, 05:22AM »

Just a note to clarify; the number of the mouthpiece-99,96,93,- is the diameter of the cup in inches-0.99,0.96,0.93,- so your 96B is the equivalent of a Bach 14/15 or a Schilke 45 according to the chart I use  http://www.allbrassradio.com/bonempccharts.html

Cheers

Stewbones
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Trombone means big trumpet-does that mean it is louder?
hassein
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« Reply #7 on: Oct 01, 2012, 10:55AM »

Speaking of Zottola mouthpieces-Eddie Bert played on one.
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Dukesboneman

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« Reply #8 on: Oct 01, 2012, 02:20PM »

I`ve seen pictures of him with it. So that`s what his mouthpiece was. Thanks
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Bob Riddle

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« Reply #9 on: Oct 07, 2012, 07:46AM »

Tried one of those years ago for about 6 months.Rim always felt very comfortable,good flexibility,and attacks.I always felt that they lacked a certain depth of tone for me.I knew a few players who played on them and I certainly did not hear that in their playing.
Bob
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« Reply #10 on: Oct 07, 2012, 03:49PM »

Dr. Donald S. Reinhardt had Zottola make some mouthpiececs for him without the stepped backbore. I used one for a couple of years in the mid 1970's.
Good mouthpiece, just ended up on one of Doc's that was better.
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William E. Gibson
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