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The Trombone ForumHorns, Gear, and EquipmentInstruments(Moderators: tbone62, slide advantage) Shires Q&A, what would you like to know?
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Author Topic: Shires Q&A, what would you like to know?  (Read 168265 times)
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griffinben

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« Reply #20 on: Nov 19, 2013, 02:01PM »

Do you make wraps that are similar to the Morandini wrap for Rotor valves?

The Morandini wrap is unique to the axial valve.  The ports of the axial do not line up with that of any of our other valves and the wrap would not be compatible.

I hope that helps,
Ben
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Langheck

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« Reply #21 on: Nov 19, 2013, 02:03PM »

I guess I meant something that looked like it like many German trombones have just to avoid dents on the back of the wrap.
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griffinben

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« Reply #22 on: Nov 19, 2013, 02:35PM »

I've always wondered what valve type is the most popular?  Rotor, axial, or Trubore?  And does the answer differ on tenor vs. bass?  It wouldn't be the new dual bore valve because they are so new, but wow, that is a nice valve.

Axial valves are the most popular valve though we have seen much more interest in the past year in rotary valves, particularly the new Dual-Bore valve.  Bass trombones are mostly Axial and Tru-Bore, with a much smaller percentage opting for rotors.

No matter what is most popular with others we are most interested in getting you the valve that YOU want.

-Ben
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griffinben

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« Reply #23 on: Nov 19, 2013, 02:43PM »

I guess I meant something that looked like it like many German trombones have just to avoid dents on the back of the wrap.

If we had a customer that wanted a custom wrap (and was willing to pay for the time for a custom wrap) we would probably do it.  It takes a good amount of time and money to develop the wrap, and then build the tooling to do it right.  Until there is a significant demand for closed wrap instruments we will most likely not explore it.  But you never know, we often explore different options.

What we have done, is provide people with valves for their own projects.  They aren't cheap, and we usually go through a technician, but people have bought our valves for their own wrap on a different instrument.

I hope that helps,
Ben
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Livestrong50

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« Reply #24 on: Nov 19, 2013, 04:09PM »

I've had the pleasure of playing Mr. Bollinger's own Bollinger Model before, and his old Edwards as well (which also has what I'm about to mention).  His "improved linkages" make a huge difference in the throw of the standard axial flow valve.  Why is this not an industry standard? 

Too much torque not good?  Too hard to pull? 
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trombone addict

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« Reply #25 on: Nov 19, 2013, 05:30PM »

If you are at liberty to answer: what horn combo, size, part, etc is the most profitable or popular? This is just for satisfying my curiosity.
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TromboneMonkey

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« Reply #26 on: Nov 19, 2013, 06:50PM »

If you are at liberty to answer: what horn combo, size, part, etc is the most profitable or popular? This is just for satisfying my curiosity.

I would tend to bet that the Master Series is what it is because of its relative popularity to other options, but I could be entirely off-base. 
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« Reply #27 on: Nov 19, 2013, 06:51PM »

I would tend to bet that the Master Series is what it is because of its relative popularity to other options, but I could be entirely off-base. 

I'd put my money there and I am not a betting man...
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« Reply #28 on: Nov 20, 2013, 06:32AM »

Hey griffinben,
I was wondering what your current prices are for your custom tenor line? Also is it possible to ask for the bell to come unlacquered from you guys when ordering a custom horn? :/
« Last Edit: Nov 20, 2013, 11:53AM by Jvera95 » Logged
Matt K

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« Reply #29 on: Nov 20, 2013, 06:35AM »

Hey griffinben,
I was wondering what your current prices are for you custom tenor line? Also is it possible to ask for the bell to come unlacquered from you guys when ordering a custom horn? :/

http://seshires.com/tenor.html

Quote
$3,495 with Straight Neckpipe
$4,795 with Rotary or Axial Flow Valve
$4,995 with TruBore Valve

http://www.seshires.com/faq.html

Quote
We are happy to provide unlacquered trombone bells on request, but we recommend against leaving trombone valves or slides unfinished.

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What's in a name? that which we call a tenor-bass posaune
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griffinben

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« Reply #30 on: Nov 20, 2013, 07:42AM »

I've had the pleasure of playing Mr. Bollinger's own Bollinger Model before, and his old Edwards as well (which also has what I'm about to mention).  His "improved linkages" make a huge difference in the throw of the standard axial flow valve.  Why is this not an industry standard? 

Too much torque not good?  Too hard to pull? 

The shorter throw also means more effort to actuate the levers.  Not everyone is up to this.  These valves also require a bit more care and looking after than a standard axial, not much more but a bit more oiling and care to be sure.  Our experience is that most customers are not willing to sacrifice the ease of care for the added performance.

We would be willing to put together a lever with a shorter throw on a different axial as a custom order should someone be interested.

I hope that helps!
Ben
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griffinben

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« Reply #31 on: Nov 20, 2013, 07:48AM »

If you are at liberty to answer: what horn combo, size, part, etc is the most profitable or popular? This is just for satisfying my curiosity.

As I am sure you can appreciate, I am not at liberty to speak publicly about our profits and margins, etc.

I can tell you that our most popular tenor trombone is a 7YLW/Axial/TY/TW47.  This combination just plain works for most players.  Also, these individual parts appear frequently on other horns in different combinations.  The biggest variable seems to be the valve, followed by the bell, then tuning slide. 

The Master Series is a new product and we are hopeful its popularity will continue to grow. 

I hope that helps,
Ben

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daveyboy37

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« Reply #32 on: Nov 20, 2013, 09:36AM »

7YLW/Axial/TY/TW47 just sounds like a good combo. Kind of "bach-like" but with a lighter bell.

Do a lot of people who come in for a custom horn usually start of with a "standard" spec horn and work from there, or do most come with specific ideas about what kind of options they want?
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David Sullivan
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Matt K

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« Reply #33 on: Nov 20, 2013, 09:45AM »

7YLW/Axial/TY/TW47 just sounds like a good combo. Kind of "bach-like" but with a lighter bell.

Do a lot of people who come in for a custom horn usually start of with a "standard" spec horn and work from there, or do most come with specific ideas about what kind of options they want?

And how close are people's opinions compared to what they walk out the door with?
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What's in a name? that which we call a tenor-bass posaune
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cigmar

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« Reply #34 on: Nov 20, 2013, 09:54AM »


I can tell you that our most popular tenor trombone is a 7YLW/Axial/TY/TW47.  This combination just plain works for most players.  Also, these individual parts appear frequently on other horns in different combinations.  The biggest variable seems to be the valve, followed by the bell, then tuning slide. 

I hope that helps,
Ben


What does the TY refer to?  I'm guessing it's the tuning slide, but I haven't seen that label before.
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BassBoneFL

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« Reply #35 on: Nov 20, 2013, 10:27AM »

Hi Ben

Is Steve any closer to the long awaited BII 5 bells? Be sure to duck if you have to ask him!! ;-)
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Harold Van Schaik
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« Reply #36 on: Nov 20, 2013, 10:37AM »

What does the TY refer to?  I'm guessing it's the tuning slide, but I haven't seen that label before.
Most likely either Tuning slide Yellow, or Tenor Yellow tuning slide. It's a drawn tuning slide, not a seamed one, which would be TYS, I think.
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David Sullivan
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Matt K

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« Reply #37 on: Nov 20, 2013, 11:04AM »

Most likely either Tuning slide Yellow, or Tenor Yellow tuning slide. It's a drawn tuning slide, not a seamed one, which would be TYS, I think.

Correct. They're listed on the tenor page, not the tuning slide page.

http://seshires.com/tenor.html
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What's in a name? that which we call a tenor-bass posaune
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« Reply #38 on: Nov 20, 2013, 08:27PM »

The shorter throw also means more effort to actuate the levers.  Not everyone is up to this.  These valves also require a bit more care and looking after than a standard axial, not much more but a bit more oiling and care to be sure.  Our experience is that most customers are not willing to sacrifice the ease of care for the added performance.

We would be willing to put together a lever with a shorter throw on a different axial as a custom order should someone be interested.

I hope that helps!
Ben

Sorry, you'd be willing to do this for Shires valves?  Or do you really mean any axial on the market?  I'm not quite certain what you meant.  I'd certainly be interested if you're suggesting any valve can have this type of conversion...

Thanks for the info 
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SilverBone
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« Reply #39 on: Nov 20, 2013, 09:33PM »

Couple questions for the expert:

Is there an upcharge for the long (Bach-length) slides?

I have a TW47L and a TW47G (no L on the latter).  I bought the gold-brass slide new, and it's still basically new because I much prefer the longer slide.  Does Shires ever have trade-in programs that would allow me to trade the TW47G (+ some cash, presumably) for a TW47GL?

Thanks for offering to answer our questions, Ben!
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