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Author Topic: Suggestions on trombone stands?  (Read 7063 times)
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Bret Steed

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« Reply #20 on: Mar 19, 2015, 12:51PM »

I would never buy anything other than the K&M stand - GREAT stand!! Good!
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« Reply #21 on: Apr 08, 2015, 11:36AM »

If your looking for something a bit different, I use the Hercules DS520B, and really like it.  This stand grips your trombone on the handslide (like you'd grip it if you were holding it).  Somehow I've always felt a bit nervous about denting the bell with the traditional trombone stand setup.  Of course one of the drawbacks to this design is that it takes up more space, so it doesn't always work if your performing on a crowded stage.
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« Reply #22 on: Jun 23, 2015, 06:23PM »

Only the old ones' legs will sit flat on the floor. The new ones are not the same. If you have an old one keep it and look after it, they are much better than the new version.....

I got a Hamilton stand about 5 years ago, it lays fairly flat to me (not sure how flat those old ones you're talking about are) but the legs have maybe 2 inches height off the ground maximum. I have not had any problems or issues with the stand, and I appreciate how low the legs lay. I have a sock over the top and it works fine, pretty easy to adjust and fairly portable.

That said, I am currently buying a K+M 14990 for my bass bone, as my Hamilton stand far too risky for long term use with a bass bone. I've gotten several positive recommendations in person for this stand and I see that many others have on the forum also.
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MikeBMiller
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« Reply #23 on: Jun 23, 2015, 08:09PM »

I have had 4 Hamiltons over the years and all have failed in one way or another. Got a K&M a couple of years ago and love it.
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« Reply #24 on: Jun 23, 2015, 11:56PM »

This is another vote for the Hercules stand that grips by the slide hand-grips. Admittedly they're not for everybody but they are great if you ever need to leave a mute in for a quick change and they hold your trombone very securely.

The negatives are there however. Most notably is that bass trombones with the second trigger actuated by your middle finger won't fit on the Hercules stand, the trigger gets in the way. And if your trombone is of a weird size; (Bigger than the wide Bach slides or smaller than a 2B) It won't fit onto the stand.

Good luck with your quest!
-Jared
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« Reply #25 on: Jun 24, 2015, 12:36AM »

I'm on my second Hamilton (old style, flat legs).
The first lasted almost 10 years until I stood on one of the legs on a gig and it broke at the joint (totally my own fault).
My current one has lasted over 20 years.
Of course you can get stands which fold up smaller for storage, but they are never as sturdy and I know which attribute I'd rather have. Hamilton is simple, safe & sturdy to use, built to last & reasonably priced.
It's also by far and away the nicest looking stand out there IMHO.

One final word about their aftersales... After 20 years of use, I managed to lose one of the rubber foot caps off my stand.
Annoying, as I have polished hardwood floors at home. On the off-chance, I fired off a quick email to Hamilton explaining things, asking if they had any foot caps, and could I please buy a couple. A few days later a box arrived containing a bag full of foot caps, plastic bell cups, rubber centre-pole tips. Enough replacement parts for several stands to last several lifetimes. Totally free of charge & fast-shipped to me here in the UK at zero cost. Also in the box was a note - "Glad you like the stand, here's to the next 20 years". Absolutely brilliant.
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Remo

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« Reply #26 on: Jun 24, 2015, 01:36AM »

I've had a Hamilton stand for close to 40 years now, and no problems with it at all.  A bit small for a bass trombone though.  I also have a UMI - K&M 14990, about 8 years and it's been great.  And I have an older K&M from the early '90's that is very similar to the UMI version, but not quite the same.  I think it may just be an earlier version, the legs are a bit shorter, have rubber cones as feet, a bigger rubber tip on top and it's chrome.  I found this pic of it, anyone got an idea about the K&M model number?




I've had a couple things go wrong with it.  The bottom lock screw stripped out long ago, (brass threads against steel threads, duh) which I just replaced with a thumb screw from the hardware store.  However, the lock screw at the middle for the extension froze up.  Could not get it un-stuck or out at all.  Could not even drill it out!  So a buddy and I fixed it by extending full length, drilling a hole all the way through, and using a cotter pin to keep it in place.  Works fine, just strange how the lock screw froze up like it did.  My only concern on the 14990 is since it's the same lock screws, that it doesn't develop the same problems.
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« Reply #27 on: Jun 24, 2015, 01:36PM »

I have 4 K&M 14990 - two black and two silver. 

Bought the silver one first and loved it.  I use it at home.  Bought a second one to throw in my gig bag.  This one was black because they didn't make the silver ones anymore.  Then someone local (Craig's List) sold me a used black one in perfect shape for under $20 - too good to pass up.  I threw that one in my car for when I forget to put the stand in my gig bag.  Finally, I found someone who had some of the silver ones on clearance and bought one just because I like the silver ones slightly better and I figured I'd never see one for sale again.

I think I'm stocked for life.  Or a trombone party.

BTW, there's also a 50 year old Hamilton sitting in the corner which is perfectly functional too, but the K&Ms handle heavier horns better.

I checked the silver ones for a model number but couldn't find one.
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« Reply #28 on: Jun 24, 2015, 04:05PM »

I still have a couple of 40 year old Hamiltons. They're perfect as far as I'm concerned: sturdy, flat to the floor so less chance of some clumsy sax player tripping over them, easy to adjust and they stay adjusted, and, easy to set up and pack up. I even used one with my 72H back in the day, and it was perfectly secure. I wish I had more of them.

I recently bought a couple of super cheap Mainline stands, figuring they would be good enough to sit in the practice room and never see a bandstand. I can't recommend them at all. They're awkward to adjust; the bell sits on a hard plastic flare; and the ball on top is so big I'm afraid it will get stuck in the bell if I extend it up too far. AND, they tend to tilt over slightly when you put a horn on them, because the connections are sloppy and loose. They're trash ... affordable trash, but still trash.
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« Reply #29 on: Apr 20, 2017, 09:49AM »

Sorry to resurrect this old thread, but we have so many threads on trombone stands, I didn't want to start another. I've got a collection of stands for my horns, and I've recently acquired a few more, so I have several different ones to compare side-by-side. Just thought I'd write a short review of my thoughts on each. These aren't all the stands that exist, just the ones that I have.

Unknown in-bell - I got this used on ebay. It's extremely light and compact, and surprisingly sturdy, and really does fit safely inside the trombone bell while it's in the case. Not sure I'd use it on a rickety stage, or for anything but a small bore non-f-attachment horn, but if I had to travel with an instrument stand, this would be the one. It doesn't have any name on it, can someone help me identify it?


On-Stage - cheap, but I really dislike these. The spring is a bad idea, and the round height adjuster grips aren't stiff enough to allow you to tighten it down enough


Hercules hand brace stand - these are nice if you have a horn that you rest with a mute in it (?!) or a horn without a slide lock. Also the only way to make sure you don't stress the slide or the bell - both of which are damaged frequently on conventional stands. Also, these are a lot heavier than they look, and they don't fold down very compactly, so this is a stay at home stand for me.


Hamilton standard - I've had one of these for 40 years. It works. Doesn't break down or set up very easily. Don't like to travel with it. It's cheap.


Aida - high quality, high cost, light weight, works ok, but not excessively stable. Looks like high end photographic equipment. Great to travel with, packs small, but I wouldn't put a bass trombone on it.


K&M 14985 - These are my favorite general use stands because they have low profile round legs that don't threaten your slide crook, and they're easy to tear down and set up. Relatively inexpensive. I know other people prefer the heavy duty UMI stands, but I find those completely overkill, plus the plate stock legs have sharp corners, which are a danger to your slide crook.


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BillO
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« Reply #30 on: Apr 20, 2017, 12:21PM »

K&M 14990 Good!

If you get one, immediately put a little grease on the all the locking knob threads .. and only on the threads.  As well, do not over tighten them.  This will stop the stripping of the threads that some people talk about.  You will have to re-apply the grease every 3 or 4 years.
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BillO
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« Reply #31 on: Apr 20, 2017, 12:38PM »

Only the old ones' legs will sit flat on the floor. The new ones are not the same. If you have an old one keep it and look after it, they are much better than the new version.....
Why would the legs being flat on the floor make it more stable?  As soon as it tilts from vertical even slightly it will be on the ends of two of the legs, no?  Wouldn't the span of the legs be a more important contributor to stability than the ability to lie flat?

Sorry, read a little further, now it makes sense.
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« Reply #32 on: Apr 20, 2017, 12:41PM »

http://www.kolberg.com/products/en_GB/152/product/4928.html


This is what we use in the pit. Heavy beasts but solid. At home I use 3 K&Ms and am quite happy (alto, spare tenor and bass).
Kolberg are a percussion company and make the best percussion stands around so you can trust their work. The 330 price point may turn you off though.
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BillO
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« Reply #33 on: Apr 20, 2017, 12:46PM »

http://www.kolberg.com/products/en_GB/152/product/4928.html


This is what we use in the pit. Heavy beasts but solid. At home I use 3 K&Ms and am quite happy (alto, spare tenor and bass).
Kolberg are a percussion company and make the best percussion stands around so you can trust their work. The 330 price point may turn you off though.
Wow, they look impressive.  So is the price!!!!
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sabutin

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« Reply #34 on: Apr 20, 2017, 09:45PM »

Does that depend on the vintage of the Hamilton stand?  I have a very old one (50+ years) that will sit flat on the floor.  But I think recent ones may not be able to do that.

Yes.

The new ones are crap.

S.
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BillO
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« Reply #35 on: Apr 20, 2017, 09:57PM »

Yes.

The new ones are crap.

S.
You could say , "The new ones are Trump".  Same thing.

All that aside ... I have a 25YO Hamilton that is of the Trump kind.  I've never liked it much, but it is still doing the same sub-standard job.  I recently bought a couple of the K&M 14990 stands, and they are Obama good.

All foolishness (not really) aside, the K&M are head and shoulders above the current Hamilton in terms of quality, design, stability and usability.  Either way, remember to put a little grease on all the locking screws.
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Never look at the conductor. You just encourage them.

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« Reply #36 on: Apr 21, 2017, 01:26AM »

Sorry to resurrect this old thread, but we have so many threads on trombone stands, I didn't want to start another. I've got a collection of stands for my horns, and I've recently acquired a few more, so I have several different ones to compare side-by-side. Just thought I'd write a short review of my thoughts on each. These aren't all the stands that exist, just the ones that I have.

-----

Aida - high quality, high cost, light weight, works ok, but not excessively stable. Looks like high end photographic equipment. Great to travel with, packs small, but I wouldn't put a bass trombone on it.


-----


The K&M 14990 has been my long-time favorite and most secure feeling stand. Stable and simple design, a little bulky though.

I recently acquired the Aida stand through Horn Guys and have tested it out in rehearsals, transportation, and concert settings.

Rehearsals -
Using it with my Edwards T-350CR, it works like a dream. Stable and balanced with the slide just above the stand leg.
Using it with my Edwards B-502i, it can be a little scary. I set it low so my slide sits just above the stand leg level, this helps to keep it slightly more stable. If the slide sits between the legs of the stand, it has a higher chance of tipping over.

Transportation -
Very light and folds compactly. I have a Marcus Bonna Double Bass and Tenor case and I strap the Aida stand to the case with no problems.
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« Reply #37 on: Apr 21, 2017, 06:20AM »

Just make sure you get one with five legs and your fears of tipping over are over. 

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Matt K

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« Reply #38 on: Apr 21, 2017, 09:43AM »

K&M 14990. 100%.  Mine got ran over and still works fine! Anybody wants to trade me their 14990 for Hercules or Hamilton stands, let me know. I've got several of those but only one 14990 and I'd like a few more!

Side note: the herclues ones that fit the slides don't work particularly well with the narrow Shires instruments.  (Presumably Conn 88 width too).  They have several "clicks" that determine how wide they are. Basicaly with that width, they are too wide to be fit on one setting but then not wide enough on the immediately narrower setting. You can get around it by making it too narrow and then putting the horn on it, then making it wider again. But not the most optimal solution.
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« Reply #39 on: Apr 21, 2017, 10:21AM »

Only the old ones' legs will sit flat on the floor. The new ones are not the same. If you have an old one keep it and look after it, they are much better than the new version.....

I'm still using the old Hamilton I got back in '73. Only problem is the rubber caps keep falling off the feet. Guess I'll break out the Gorilla Glue! I also have a Hercules in bell travel stand for a couple of years now and have had zero problems with it.
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