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The Trombone ForumPractice BreakFood and Drink(Moderators: RedHotMama, BFW) TTF Wine Snobs?? Anyone?
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NJSouth
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« on: Oct 25, 2015, 05:01AM »

   I've seen a lot of beer posts here but where are the TTF wine people. Who has what? Anything special sitting in that wine rack? I just got a 2002 bottle of "D Cubed" Zinfandel yesterday. Its gonna sit for another 5 years or so at least. My sister turned me into a wine snob. I'm a heavy Red wine guy myself. Currently exploring Chilean and Argentinian wines. How about you?
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chipolah

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« Reply #1 on: Oct 25, 2015, 02:17PM »

I live most of the time in the southern Rhone Valley, one of the finest wine producing areas in France.  There are so many big and small producers, I can visit a new one every day for probably 5 years.  I have some wonderful wines in my collection. (mostly reds, but also some great whites)  I have to say, A good California Zinfandel is one of my all-time favorites.  The selection of good Zins over here in Europe is quite limited. 
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« Reply #2 on: Oct 25, 2015, 02:28PM »

I am far from a wine snob but always have a few bottles of Franconian Silvaner or Müller-Thurgau in the fridge. Had some beautiful ones just last night matched with a Michelin starred degustation.
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« Reply #3 on: Oct 26, 2015, 12:04PM »

  Wow... I hit the jack pot with you guys over there. The French wines baffle me to this day. So many regions so many wines. I'm just getting around to a starter collection. This last purchase helped that quite a bit.

    Some of the German Rieslings have stood out in my memory. I don't drink it often but remember it when I do. This most recent purchase has several Spanish, Chilean, and Argentinian bottles. I have bottle of "Leo". Never heard of it but its apparently from an Argentine Soccer Players Vineyard.
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chipolah

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« Reply #4 on: Oct 26, 2015, 06:35PM »

Good choices...  I think the best wine values in the US are from Argentina and Chile.  Usually good wine for a good price.  Yeah... there are a lot of wine regions in France, but it's not that complicated.   Let me know if you want some advice.  I will say, that French wines are overpriced in the US.  Spanish wines are a good value for the money.
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« Reply #5 on: Oct 26, 2015, 06:58PM »

I am a beer snob, but when it comes to wine, I am just as happy with a $4 bottle from Aldi as just about anything else. I guess if I actually knew anything about it, I might develop better taste.
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« Reply #6 on: Oct 26, 2015, 09:32PM »

I think the best wine values in the US are from Argentina and Chile.  Usually good wine for a good price.

Agreed. I just stocked up on a lovely organic Chilean 2013 Carmenere (Chile's signature red grape) called Natura, from  Emiliana Vineyards, on sale for US$8/bottle (retail US$15/bottle). Considering the quality, the price just seems absurdly cheap.

The Layer Cake Malbec from Argentina is also an exceptional value, occasionally on sale for under US$15/bottle.

I really enjoy the southern Italian wines as well. Valpolicella's fit my budget, and Zenato vineyards is a favorite. One of my friends recently opened a magnum of Zenato Amarone at a dinner party, and it was to die for, but way out of my budget.
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chipolah

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« Reply #7 on: Oct 27, 2015, 03:26AM »

Agreed. I just stocked up on a lovely organic Chilean 2013 Carmenere (Chile's signature red grape) called Natura, from  Emiliana Vineyards, on sale for US$8/bottle (retail US$15/bottle). Considering the quality, the price just seems absurdly cheap.

The Layer Cake Malbec from Argentina is also an exceptional value, occasionally on sale for under US$15/bottle.

I really enjoy the southern Italian wines as well. Valpolicella's fit my budget, and Zenato vineyards is a favorite. One of my friends recently opened a magnum of Zenato Amarone at a dinner party, and it was to die for, but way out of my budget.
Carmeniere is a really good wine that was mistaken for many years as being Merlot. Because of that, it was picked too early and made kind of an ordinary wine. A French winemaker visiting a Chilean vineyard recognized it as Carmeniere, an old Bordeaux variety.  He suggested leaving it on the vine longer to mature.  They made wine with the more mature grapes and opened up a whole new wine world.  Carmeniere in Chile makes wine better than the Carmeniere in France where it still exists in small amounts, but it's normally only used for blending. I think that Chilean discovery was made about 15 or 20 years ago.  The same kind of thing happened with Zinfandel.  The origins of Zinfandel have been cloudy over the years, but not too long ago, it was discovered that the closest grape to Zinfandel is Primitivo from Puglia in Italy.  When it is made in the New World style, it's just like Zinfandel.

If you want to find some good everyday wines that won't cost you a lot, look for  FRONTERA Carmeniere or Malbec.  They come in regular size bottles or 1-1/2 liter bottles.  The larger size bottle should be about $10 in the States.   
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« Reply #8 on: Oct 27, 2015, 03:58AM »

Something that I do have a bit of a taste for is Tokaji Aszu. Any trip to Hungary is well worth extending by a couple of days to head over to Tokaj to sample and buy a much larger variety of better stuff for much lower prices than you'll find elsewhere.

And it lasts forever... Still got a couple of bottles that were a long way from new from a trip over in 2007, the oldest from 1972, considered the finest Aszu year of the 20th century.

A really interesting taste if dessert wines are one of your things.
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NJSouth
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« Reply #9 on: Nov 06, 2015, 09:41AM »

   Just opened a very nice bottle of Simi "Alexander Valley" Cab Sav.  Very nice. Should be a good weekend for wine here. Anyone else?
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« Reply #10 on: Nov 06, 2015, 10:10AM »

Affordables -

2 buck chuck is surprisingly good for a sub $3 bottle of plonk. They have it in Nebraska, my buddy brings a case back each time he visits family up there.

Santa Christina's offerings are awesome - their sangiovese is my go to - I love italian wines, they are not too expensive and taste great, more than hold their own against french wines.

A mendoza malbec is always gathering dust somewhere when an impromptu steak dinner wants to happen.

Not so affordable:

For special occasions it's going to be the Caymus Cabernet - the regular one is usually between 60 and 90 a bottle and I actually prefer it to the special edition (ltd. edition?) that is in the 125 range. The Caymus Cab Sav is the wine i'd be buying cases of if I were a rich man.
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« Reply #11 on: Nov 06, 2015, 02:11PM »

I'm not a wine "snob," but I am definitely a wine drinker. And...I both refuse to pay for over-hyped, over-expensive wines nor will I drink the plonk that is foisted on U.S. drinkers by the mass-produced California crowd. (I can't even imagine being able to buy the truly great wines of the world and then put them away for however many years until they mature. That's for the wealthy. Sigh...)

I use the subscription option on the site "Wine Searcher" and over the years have found...oh, maybe 5 wine sellers in the NYC area who are in it for the wine as much as the money. I also pay attention to what the CA wine store  "K&L" has to say. Honest and knowledgeable. I get almost daily emails from those stores and when I see a bargain...to me, anything between about $10 and $15 that is truly drinkable is a bargain...I buy one. The bigger stores often have as many as 12 wines that I might like in that price range, at which point I buy a mixed case of the most likely suspects. If I like one I put it on my list for that store and often buy a case of it. When they run out I wait for the next vintage and try one of them.

Over the years I have found several wines that are widely available in my area and also very consistent vintage to vintage. When one of my wine stores has a sale...like Astor Wines, which regularly offers 20% for a day on some region or style of wine...I see if any of my faves are being offered and I get a case.

I often pay as little as $10/bottle for world-class French, Spanish and Portugese wines this way. Not the suoerstars, just good stuff that goes with how I cook and eat. I have also recently discovered S. African and CA chenin blancs that just knock me out at that price range.

Drink well.

You know what Ben Franklin said, right?

"Wine is proof that God wants us to be happy."

Yup.

S.
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« Reply #12 on: Nov 06, 2015, 03:06PM »

I'm in 'The Wine Society'. You buy in as a share holder and any profit is put back into the society so nobody is skimming off profit. They source wines from all over the world. This is in the UK, but I'm sure you must have something like that in the US.
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« Reply #13 on: Nov 07, 2015, 09:26AM »

I enjoy wine, but I've never been an enthusiastic wine drinker.  I just returned from a week in France, where we drank fine wine several times daily.  I discovered I have no palate for it at all.  Apparently I can't tell a fine wine from rotgut.  It was actually kind of embarrassing!
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« Reply #14 on: Nov 07, 2015, 09:42AM »

   Just opened a very nice bottle of Simi "Alexander Valley" Cab Sav.  Very nice. Should be a good weekend for wine here. Anyone else?


Yes, this Simi "Alexander Valley" Cab is the red wine that I keep stocked at home.  The whites are Cakebread Cellars and Frogsleap Chardonnays. 

Also try 7 Deadly Zins.  It's a nice wine to take when invited somewhere as it's name is a fun conversation starter and it's a fine drinking wine.  I was a converted guest and I've converted a lot of hosts.  Evil Good!
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« Reply #15 on: Nov 08, 2015, 04:49AM »

I enjoy wine, but I've never been an enthusiastic wine drinker.  I just returned from a week in France, where we drank fine wine several times daily.  I discovered I have no palate for it at all.  Apparently I can't tell a fine wine from rotgut.  It was actually kind of embarrassing!

     That's one of the saddest posts I've ever read....I think we here at TTF should hold a prayer vigil and trombone derge for you. J/K Well that palate of yours will save you A LOT of money in the long run. Unless of course you tell us your a single malt guy or something like that.
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« Reply #16 on: Nov 08, 2015, 05:42AM »

I enjoy wine, but I've never been an enthusiastic wine drinker.  I just returned from a week in France, where we drank fine wine several times daily.  I discovered I have no palate for it at all.  Apparently I can't tell a fine wine from rotgut.  It was actually kind of embarrassing!

Good for your bank balance, if not your liver!

Drink to enjoy the wine, not the label.

I am a definite Francophile and have spent many holidays in France-easy access from the UK. My favourites are some of the lesser known wines; Montlouis from the Loire Valley, just across the river from Vouvray and a similar white wine using the Chenin Blanc grape. Not easy to get in the UK and the home stock is almost gone, so we have another trip planned for early summer. I also like the wines from SW France-the Basque Region. Try Jurancon and Irouleguy if you can.

Cheers

Stewbones
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