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The Trombone ForumPractice BreakFood and Drink(Moderators: RedHotMama, BFW) How about a nice cup of tea?
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Roebird37

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« on: May 08, 2016, 05:31AM »

I'm a 'milk in first' person, and it seems that an actual real-life scientist agrees with me.

http://www.theguardian.com/uk/2003/jun/25/science.highereducation

You 'milk in last' people can't argue with science.  Or can you?
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« Reply #1 on: May 08, 2016, 07:13AM »

"Matters of taste are beyond disputation."
 - David Hume

Practically speaking, I find the cups are much easier to clean if you put the milk in first.

I think the tea is a bit smoother milk-first but — you know what? — sometimes I get a hankering for tea-first tea too.
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« Reply #2 on: May 08, 2016, 07:24AM »

May I suggest a poll attached to this thread?

And an option for depends on the tea!

It is of course personal preference, like mouthpieces & horns...

I prefer with the suitable tea brewed in a teapot, to put tea in first thereby the cold milk cools the tea...as opposed to hot tea into milk thus warming the milk!
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« Reply #3 on: May 08, 2016, 08:07AM »

I prefer my tea black, but for the milk crowd it has always been drummed into my head by a catholic Irish mother that God intended that the milk should be in the cup first, that way there is less chance of scalding the milk. Bad dog.  No Biscuits.

My atheist beliefs require that I dispense with the milk. Evil

No, not really, it just tastes better to me without milk. Good! 
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« Reply #4 on: May 08, 2016, 09:45AM »

I enjoy arabic style tea (شاي ).  With no milk and with sugar and have it with kahi (كاهي ) which is an arabic sweet.  Perfect combo for me. :)
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« Reply #5 on: May 08, 2016, 10:26AM »

I tried to attach a poll, but you have to do that when you set up the thread.

As a Yank, I like my tea black.  I'll brew it with a bag if necessary, but a teapot using 3 teaspoons of tea is just fine.

I also like it with ice and maybe a lemon wedge.

No milk or sugar for me.

And some teas really don't go with milk.  Gunpowder in milk tastes like milk with hot water in it.  Lapsong Souchong is such a strong tea it overpowers the milk.

I also like Constant Comment (orange and spice) tea.  Again, no milk.
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« Reply #6 on: May 08, 2016, 10:36AM »

Drink it like they do in Poland: a good black tea with lemon and sugar - yum!
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« Reply #7 on: May 08, 2016, 10:37AM »

From the BBC show " The Detectorists"

" Tea without sugar is soup."

Also, the reason for tea with lemon and honey is so that the tanic acid did not stain the fine bone china cups. The lemon bleached the tea before you drank it, and kept the cup clean!
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« Reply #8 on: May 08, 2016, 11:20AM »

I agree with just about everything the scientists said in the article including "milk first".  IMHO, Ceylon BOPF (Broken Orange Pekoe Fannings) makes a better cup of tea than Assam.  It has more tea flavour and less tannin.

Here's a tip for those people who have tea-stained cups...  My Irish Mother-in-law taught me to stick a wet finger in some bi-carb and rub the stain in the cup until it's gone.  Rinse out the cup and voila, the cup is clean.
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« Reply #9 on: May 08, 2016, 01:35PM »

I rarely have tea with milk. It gets into the 100s pretty regularly here in the summers so my tea is usually an Earl Grey with honey poured over ice. As much as my English friends like to laugh at me for this, they tend to agree with the ice when it's 110º outside.

I like it Брайтон Бич style when I'm in the mood - strong black tea with a lot of sugar... I can't hold the cubes in my teeth while I drink it, though, my teeth ache when they get that close to raw sugar (I'm sure the ache is all in my head...)

Occasionally I'll do the milk and tea and add honey and spices.
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« Reply #10 on: May 08, 2016, 05:59PM »

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/fGoWLWS4-kU" target="_blank">https://www.youtube.com/v/fGoWLWS4-kU</a>

This is the "clean version". I accidentally had the not clean version up for two seconds. Whoops.
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« Reply #11 on: May 08, 2016, 06:05PM »

Black Orange Pekoe with lemon over ice (no sugar of any kind) is astounding in the heat of the day.  Works well if the heat extends into the night too.  Just add a little vodka..(seriously, just a little!)..and up the lemon a tad.
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« Reply #12 on: May 08, 2016, 07:06PM »

Black Orange Pekoe with lemon over ice (no sugar of any kind) is astounding in the heat of the day.  Works well if the heat extends into the night too.  Just add a little vodka..(seriously, just a little!)..and up the lemon a tad.

I wanna drink tea with you...
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« Reply #13 on: May 09, 2016, 11:07AM »

I learned about that mix from two separate southern gentlemen in Savannah and Lake Charles.  I guess I hang around with the right kind of tea-totaler.
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« Reply #14 on: May 10, 2016, 12:51AM »

I agree with just about everything the scientists said in the article including "milk first".  IMHO, Ceylon BOPF (Broken Orange Pekoe Fannings) makes a better cup of tea than Assam.  It has more tea flavour and less tannin.


I'm pretty stuck in my ways, always have Assam, but will try some Ceylon BOPF and let you know how I get on.

Life on the wild side!
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« Reply #15 on: May 26, 2016, 03:47AM »

Chipolah, I've been trying the Ceylon for a couple of weeks.  It's very nice, but I think I'll be keeping it for the afternoons, and go back to Assam in the mornings.  I was brought up on tea brewed so strong that you could stand the spoon up in it, and I just can't get the Ceylon strong enough to wake me up.

I just wasn't bred for the finer things in life.  Don't know
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« Reply #16 on: May 26, 2016, 07:13AM »

Chipolah, I've been trying the Ceylon for a couple of weeks.  It's very nice, but I think I'll be keeping it for the afternoons, and go back to Assam in the mornings.  I was brought up on tea brewed so strong that you could stand the spoon up in it, and I just can't get the Ceylon strong enough to wake me up.

I just wasn't bred for the finer things in life.  Don't know
I can get it strong.  I use loose tea, water really boiling and I brew it for six minutes minimum in a tea pot. In a small pot I use 3 heaping spoons of tea. I think the Assam seems stronger because it has a lot of tannin where the Ceylon has less tannin and more actual tea flavour.

Don't sell yourself short.  Go for the GOLD !!   Good!
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« Reply #17 on: May 26, 2016, 10:15PM »

I brew the same way, I think maybe the tannin flavour is what my tastebuds want.
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« Reply #18 on: May 27, 2016, 04:43AM »

Maybe it's addictive.  Evil  Pant
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« Reply #19 on: May 27, 2016, 07:12AM »

I'm with you Roebird... when I drink black teas, I want high tannin. Ceylon doesn't really do it for me. I associate those tannins with "tea flavor"

I got a lovely tin of Earl Grey at a shop in King's Lynn (UK) several years ago that smelled so strongly of bergamot and clove that my horn case still had the smell months later. It was strong! That was the tea that convinced me that milk is a necessity - I drank a cup of it straight one morning and it nearly made me ill... with milk it was perfect.
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« Reply #20 on: May 27, 2016, 08:50AM »

Tannins make me sick. Someone made me a tea using a teabag once and without me knowing they squeezed the last drops out of the bag against a spoon into the cup before giving it to me. About ten minutes later I was sorry I was even alive.

I'm pretty sure most of the tannins and oils shoukd stay inside the black tea away from humans.
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« Reply #21 on: May 27, 2016, 10:08AM »

Every morning I have a big cup of PG tips, milk first. Latter I have very strong coffe, thenn it is coffe first and milk latter.
I really don´t know why.
In the evening I often have tea, Builders, black. (Or a glass of vine.)
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« Reply #22 on: May 27, 2016, 11:46AM »

I know the Brits don't think ice tea is tea, but...

I like more tannins in ice tea, but for hot tea medium tannins are best on my tongue.  I need to taste them, but not enough to make the tea unbalanced and bitter.

I really like green tea too.  I usually make that so strong it has more kick than coffee. The flavor is very mild to begin with so I just go a bit mad with it.
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« Reply #23 on: May 27, 2016, 12:12PM »

For our Canadian friends, is Red Rose the Budweiser of teas or is there something to it?  I do use it in a bag from time to time although when we brew a pot it's PG Tips.
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« Reply #24 on: May 27, 2016, 12:42PM »

For our Canadian friends, is Red Rose the Budweiser of teas or is there something to it?  I do use it in a bag from time to time although when we brew a pot it's PG Tips.
RED ROSE... Very nice tea !!
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« Reply #25 on: May 27, 2016, 12:54PM »

Red Rose black is not a bad tea.  Quite nice.  My wife dose does not like it, but I do.  I have not tried the breakfast blend.
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« Reply #26 on: May 28, 2016, 11:20PM »

Tomorrow (30 May) at 12:04 on Radio 4, The Curious Cases of Rutherford & Fry will tackle some of these vital issues. Or you can listen on the website now (http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b07ctt11).
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« Reply #27 on: May 29, 2016, 06:48AM »

I'm with you Roebird... when I drink black teas, I want high tannin. Ceylon doesn't really do it for me. I associate those tannins with "tea flavor"

I got a lovely tin of Earl Grey at a shop in King's Lynn (UK) several years ago that smelled so strongly of bergamot and clove that my horn case still had the smell months later. It was strong! That was the tea that convinced me that milk is a necessity - I drank a cup of it straight one morning and it nearly made me ill... with milk it was perfect.

There are worse things for a case to smell of!

I do love Earl Grey, but again it's an afternoon tea.  It just doesn't have enough welly for me first thing in the morning.
Before lunch I don't just need to tickle my tastebuds, I have to give them a proper belt.
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« Reply #28 on: Jun 06, 2016, 01:52PM »

I am English. I always have been and I guess I always will be.

I DON'T LIKE TEA!

I can't stand the smell of it and can't get near it.

I don't like beer either (or the foreign lager stuff)

I think I might start a topic about my favourite tipple:-

Anybody here like SCRUMPY?

Cheers

Stewbones

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« Reply #29 on: Jun 06, 2016, 02:24PM »

Stewbones43
I am English. I always have been and I guess I always will be.

I DON'T LIKE TEA!

(Probably too late to suggest seeking professional help to resolve those childhood issues which have left you in such a condition...)

I think I might start a topic about my favourite tipple:-

Anybody here like SCRUMPY?

(Now there's a real English beverage. It predates all those nasty foreign influences like Chinese cha or German beer.)

Cheers

Stewbones

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Ive taken the pledge so lift a pint for me, scrumpy not sweet.

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« Reply #30 on: Jun 06, 2016, 02:54PM »

I am English. I always have been and I guess I always will be.

I DON'T LIKE TEA!

Anybody here like SCRUMPY?

Stewbones


Being a typical clueless Yank, I have never heard of scrumpy, and had to look it up:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scrumpy

As for me - I am not English, but I do like tea - preferably high-quality, loose-leaf, 1 teaspoon tea leaves/8 ounces of boiling water, steeped in a pot for ~4 minutes.  And I drink it straight up - no milk, sugar, lemon, etc.! 
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« Reply #31 on: Jun 06, 2016, 03:05PM »

I live in San Francisco where there is a large Asian and particularly Chinese community.  And I married into a Chinese family.  So, I have been exposed to some teas that I never knew about growing up in New England.  

My two favorites are Bo-Nay (aka Pu-Erh) and Hoji-Cha.  Bo-Nay is a fermented black tea that has a very unique flavor and is sometimes marketed as Dim-Sum tea.  Dim-Sum places here seems to either serve Bo-Nay or Jasmine.  And Hoji-Cha, my current tea of choice, is a roasted green tea.  I don't usually go for green teas but this one is great.  These are both worth trying.  Cheers!
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« Reply #32 on: Jun 06, 2016, 07:16PM »

Green tea, over ice, with half a lemon squeezed into it.

I don't understand the attraction of boiling hot beverages.

I don't like milk in either tea or coffee.

I like milk as milk.
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« Reply #33 on: Jun 06, 2016, 07:46PM »

I never really understood the appeal of PG Tips, which always tasted sort of "dirty" to me. And chrysanthemum tea tastes like you just did a faceplant into a dandelion field. And don't even get me started on Southern iced sweet tea, which I suspect is basically brown corn syrup. But some teas that I do like would include:

South African rooibos - nice and woodsy without being harsh or bitter
Really thick matcha green tea - the kind your spoon might stand up in, great in ice cream too
Iced Korean bori-cha (barley tea) - served by the pitcher in L.A.'s K-town restaurants; clean grainy taste makes it perfect on a hot day's lunch with Korean BBQ
Lapsang souchong (smoked black tea) - great on a cold night; this is like the tea equivalent of putting on a paisley velvet robe and lighting a pipe after dinner
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« Reply #34 on: Jun 06, 2016, 10:51PM »

I am English. I always have been and I guess I always will be.

Anybody here like SCRUMPY?

Cheers

Stewbones



Oi, start your own cider thread!  :D

Actually, I'm rather partial to a bit of scrumpy myself when I'm off duty.

We live close to Rich's so we used to buy from them.  Then my husband started visiting Thatchers as it was on his way home from work - the Cheddar Valley Red is my favourite but I also like the Heritage.

Recently he's discovered Crossmans at Hewish (North of Weston Super Mare on the A370).  They have a very good medium cider, but the strength varies considerably from week to week, so it's a bit of Russian roulette.

Where do you get yours from, what's the best farmhouse cider in the Taunton area?
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« Reply #35 on: Jun 07, 2016, 05:50AM »

Milk first, but only because it fits me brewing routine. Wouldn't go so far as to call it a ritual...

King Cole, stringless bags of Orange Pekoe from New Brunswick. French press, only ever used for tea, brought over to the kettle just as it clicks off. Screen plunged at about the ninety second mark when things are falling nicely into place. Three minutes, maybe OK; but five minutes is stewed, IMO. I imagine a bag of King Cole would make a nice builder's tea.

Occasional Lapsang Souchong, what the drummer in my wife's band calls "burned log tea," brewed loose in a mug, strained into another. Does anybody put milk in that? I take it black.
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« Reply #36 on: Jun 07, 2016, 06:19AM »

Milk first, but only because it fits me brewing routine. Wouldn't go so far as to call it a ritual...

King Cole, stringless bags of Orange Pekoe from New Brunswick. French press, only ever used for tea, brought over to the kettle just as it clicks off. Screen plunged at about the ninety second mark when things are falling nicely into place. Three minutes, maybe OK; but five minutes is stewed, IMO. I imagine a bag of King Cole would make a nice builder's tea.

Occasional Lapsang Souchong, what the drummer in my wife's band calls "burned log tea," brewed loose in a mug, strained into another. Does anybody put milk in that? I take it black.
Never milk in Lapsang Souchong !!
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« Reply #37 on: Jun 07, 2016, 09:02AM »

I don't like milk in any tea, but particularly Lapsang Souchong.

We don't do scrumpy on this side of the pond, but in the fall most of the local apple orchards do their own apple cider which I really like.
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« Reply #38 on: Jun 07, 2016, 09:17AM »

I wonder if the variety of opinions on PG is due to it being blended for different markets, like Gusiness varies regionally.

Years back it was good. My wife bought a large box of bags recently and it's awful. Luckily I had just read an article linked from a National Health site which recommended strong tea for an antifungal foot bath. A dozen bags in a gallon or so of water with a teaspoon of ground cinnamon works very well. Although it stains your feet and nails...

For a strong morning cup (rotgut in wine speak) I'm finding cheap teas packaged for the Muslim market to be a good buy. Al Wazah is a FBOP from Sri Lanka I can buy locally for less than U$ 10.00/500g.

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