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The Trombone ForumPractice BreakPolls(Moderators: bhcordova, RedHotMama, BFW) When our language is not english.....
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Question: Is it ok to join this forum when your  primary language is not english?
Yes - 59 (98.3%)
No - 1 (1.7%)
Total Voters: 60

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timothy42b
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« Reply #40 on: Jun 09, 2016, 10:41AM »


I still hate answering machines don't speak english at all (except with my wife) anymore.

I used to be in your neighborhood.  I worked at Faulenberg Kaserne and Leighton Barracks 2003 - 2006, lived in Kitzingen.  (well, Grosslangheim)   When we moved to Wuerzburg we stayed at the Dorint Hotel until we found a house.  Great hotel, VERY scarey parking garage for an American with a big vehicle.

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Tim Richardson
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« Reply #41 on: Jun 09, 2016, 12:21PM »

People who know three languages are called trilingual.
People who know two languages are called bilingual.
People who know only one language are called Americans. :D

However, research shows that About One in Four Americans Can Hold a Conversation in a Second Language

That's still less than Europe, where Most Europeans can speak multiple languages. UK and Ireland not so much

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...Almost everyone in Luxembourg (98%), Latvia (95%), the Netherlands (94%), Malta (93%), Slovenia and Lithuania (92% each), and Sweden (91%) are able to speak at least one language in addition to their mother tongue.

Countries where people are least likely to be able to speak any foreign language are Hungary (65%), Italy (62%), the UK and Portugal (61% in each), and Ireland (60%).
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Robert Holmén

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« Reply #42 on: Jun 09, 2016, 02:19PM »

My family is Arab and I can speak both Arabic and English.  Only my grandparents speak Arabic to me not the other grandchildren as they only know English.  I'm also the only one to be born outside the US. 
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Ethan Wadie
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« Reply #43 on: Jun 09, 2016, 02:57PM »

I used to be in your neighborhood.  I worked at Faulenberg Kaserne and Leighton Barracks 2003 - 2006, lived in Kitzingen.  (well, Grosslangheim)   When we moved to Wuerzburg we stayed at the Dorint Hotel until we found a house.  Great hotel, VERY scarey parking garage for an American with a big vehicle.



I love würzburg. Unfortunately I don't live there anymore. After winning a job in another orchestra I moved. I really should update my profile.

At least in Würzburg there are enough students that english is common enough for tourists to get around. Kitzingen must have been something else.
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Eastcheap

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« Reply #44 on: Jun 09, 2016, 04:20PM »

I made the topic a little stupid, the question should be only for me who cant Express myself in English.

I think we got that, and the response has been overwhelmingly in your favor.

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I hoped my English would be better after some time but its not, my wife tells its even worse because I started blend in some Norwegian Words.. :D

Feel free.  It makes things mer interessant.


One of our friends commented that English is taught in schools.  Then he asked the group of adult Americans how many of them could still do their high school geometry problems.

If every other TV program were about geometry, I bet the results would be different.  Scandinavians take English really seriously, but there's a, sometimes stark, generational divide.



I'd guess that it's considerably higher in Dallas.

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Multiple languages often means multiple closely related languages...plus English.  For various political reasons, English was never divided up in the same way, so its closest relation that unambiguously counts as a separate language is probably Dutch.  Dansk/norsk/svenska are also closer than you might think.  But none is all that close.

Also, consider that you can get on a commuter flight most anywhere in Europe and, after a half hour in flight, stand a good chance of landing in a different country with a different language.  Try that from Love Field and you'll land in San Antonio.

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UK and Ireland not so much

Well, the next-door neighbor is France.  Need I say more?

(The other British languages are another topic; one waaay beyond the scope of this conversation.)
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gregs70

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« Reply #45 on: Jun 09, 2016, 06:35PM »


I read the Gallup poll.  55% of those one in four speak Spanish.  I would wager that a large majority of the 25% are immigrants or children of immigrants, not people who grew up here and made an effort to learn another language.   
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« Reply #46 on: Jun 09, 2016, 07:57PM »

I read the Gallup poll.  55% of those one in four speak Spanish.  I would wager that a large majority of the 25% are immigrants or children of immigrants, not people who grew up here and made an effort to learn another language.   

I would wager that most of them are people who grew up here, living with elders who speak the old language but also living in the English-speaking society.
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« Reply #47 on: Jun 10, 2016, 02:03AM »

I always figured it´d be cool to join a forum about a topic that IS in a different language. Might help me build some norsk-skills...

I´ll tell you from most of the Norwegians I know... some Norwegians take NORWEGIAN really seriously Evil

But in all honesty, I (as many Americans) tend to COMPLETELY overlook most English mistakes as long as whats being said is understandable. There´s a point at which one admits that one CAN speak/write a language, and as far as I know, every non-native English speaker on the this forum who post frequently is far, far above that point.

For my own part, I say I CAN speak Norwegian, but the thing that holds ME back is that I´m a natural mumbler so I freak out in social situations for fear that folk won´t understand or will take it for "bad norwegian" (it´s happened many times!) Amazed
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« Reply #48 on: Jun 10, 2016, 03:57PM »

I´ll tell you from most of the Norwegians I know... some Norwegians take NORWEGIAN really seriously Evil

Den norske språkstriden is most likely also beyond the scope of the conversation.  :D

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But in all honesty, I (as many Americans) tend to COMPLETELY overlook most English mistakes as long as whats being said is understandable.

Economic and cultural hegemony aside, I think that's what drives the popularity of English. Let's face it, speakers of some languages (and I'm thinking of a couple of common Romance languages in particular) can be absurdly intolerant of foreign accents and idioms, even (okay, especially) when the foreigners are native speakers of the language.
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timothy42b
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« Reply #49 on: Jun 10, 2016, 05:43PM »

Let's face it, speakers of some languages (and I'm thinking of a couple of common Romance languages in particular) can be absurdly intolerant of foreign accents and idioms, even (okay, especially) when the foreigners are native speakers of the language.

I've heard that of France but didn't have enough words to even try it.  In Germany they were very tolerant of my attempts to speak German.  Of course, I had no choice, and there were a few incidents where there was a reason they pretended to not understand.  My boss had an interesting theory.  Most of our employees didn't speak English though the supervisors had some.  Anyway, he told me he tried to always mumble a bit when he spoke German.  He said if he mumbled they usually did what he wanted, but if he spoke really clearly sometimes they did what he said literally, and ended up not what he intended. 
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Tim Richardson
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« Reply #50 on: Jun 10, 2016, 06:32PM »

French people talk French. They learn English and german in school, but they have a common rule.... never use it.  Amazed

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« Reply #51 on: Jun 11, 2016, 06:37AM »

French people talk French. They learn English and german in school, but they have a common rule.... never use it.  Amazed

Leif

I learned that first hand.  I was sent to work at a circuit board manufacturing shop my company owned outside of Paris.  The company had sent a guy who spoke no French to try to straighten out the operation.  I got a 2 week assignment to work with the silkscreen department, which was great for me since my wife has cousins who live in Paris and environs.  I had learned a little French in High School and practiced my awful French with the production workers.

We needed to get some stuff from an American company shipped to France.  Our American director was having no luck talking to the Purchasing Manager.  So I went in and tried in my broken French to explain what I needed.  The Purchasing Manager suddenly stood up and said "Don't worry, sonny boy, I'll have it by morning".  In perfect English!  What I discovered was that a feeble attempt to speak French in France is more appreciated than sign language or shouting.
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Bruce Guttman
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« Reply #52 on: Jun 11, 2016, 11:01AM »

 I travelled in Korea in 1974. At that time there were still many who had been forced to learn Japanese during the occupation. I was traveling with a small group of American and Japanese students. The older Koreans, if asked a question in Japanese would obviously understand but ice over. Asked a question by the same student, Japanese or American, in any semblance of Korean they would instantly become open hearted and welcoming to guests in their country. Student age Koreans were dying to be helpful and use their English skills.

Which is to say, language carries a lot of history which effects how people use it.

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« Reply #53 on: Jun 11, 2016, 01:53PM »

See today's posts on the "Shire" thread.
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« Reply #54 on: Jul 01, 2016, 02:44PM »

If your main language is not English but you have some fluency you are welcome.  I have had some problems with people who write in their language and have Google Translate put it in English, then take our responses and try to have Google Translate translate the answers back into their language.  In most cases we won't understand the question and the requester won't understand the answers.

If you want to start a Forum in Norwegian, Russian, Swedish, or even Esperanto, that's great.  But make the people converse in the Forum language.

Try a game called Lost in Translation:

1. Translate a passage from one language to another using Google Translate
2. Translate it back to the original language.

They had a segment on Canadian radio where they did this with song lyrics, and they sung the output of the second step to the original tune. It was pretty funny.
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Martin Hubel
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« Reply #55 on: Jul 01, 2016, 02:55PM »

On the old Jack Paar Tonight Show he used to have a funny variant of the old game of Telephone.

Paar's band leader was Jose Melis, who spoke great Spanish but somewhat fractured English.  Paar would invite a number of international stars who were multilingual (usually female) like Anna Maria Alberghetti, Zsa Zsa Gabor, etc.  Paar would tell a joke to one of the ladies, who would translate it into another language for the next, and into a third for the next, up to the last one who would translate it into Spanish for Melis.  Then Melis would have to translate what he heard back into English.  The result was often a riot.
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Bruce Guttman
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