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The Trombone ForumTeaching & LearningHistory of the Trombone(Moderator: bhcordova) Top 10 Living Trombone Historians
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Corvus
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« on: Jul 21, 2016, 12:02PM »

Simple question here: who would you list as the top 10 living trombone historians?
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« Reply #1 on: Jul 21, 2016, 12:57PM »

Trevor Herbert would be the most obvious entry.
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« Reply #2 on: Jul 21, 2016, 01:02PM »

I would think Robert Reifsnyder would be on the list.
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« Reply #3 on: Jul 22, 2016, 03:57PM »

Christian Lindberg. None will ever be close to make it as a full time soloist.

Leif
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« Reply #4 on: Jul 22, 2016, 04:25PM »

Christian Lindberg. None will ever be close to make it as a full time soloist.

Leif

Leif, a soloist and a historian are two different things.

Ed Solomon has a massive knowledge of trombone use.  So does Howard Weiner.

Byron Pillow is trying to become the next one.
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Bruce Guttman
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« Reply #5 on: Jul 22, 2016, 06:37PM »

Leif, a soloist and a historian are two different things.

Ed Solomon has a massive knowledge of trombone use.  So does Howard Weiner.

Byron Pillow is trying to become the next one.

My vote is for Will Kimball.

 Christian IS a bit of a historian of the trombone. He has dug up and reorchestrated a LOT of repertoire.

He also has no shame in modifying historical works in order to make them more entertaining and exciting. The Mozart Trombone Concerto is a good example if this. Minus one history point ...

Anyways, we owe the Bis recording of the Shilkret concerto to him as well. One if the only recordings, anyway. The guy who owns the rights and won't publish it is a crook.

His goal was also to catalogue performances of the repertoire with BIS, and he has done that as well.
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« Reply #6 on: Jul 22, 2016, 06:55PM »

I'll second Will Kimball.  His trombone history timeline is quite an accumulation of research and still accumulating.
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« Reply #7 on: Jul 22, 2016, 06:59PM »

It's kinda fun to make a big bowl of popcorn and watch Kimball and Weiner duke it out over some bit of trombone trivia. :-P

We also have some specialists like John Lowe on Olds, Stewbones on Besson/Boosey, and a couple of guys on King.  And let's not forget Svenne and Blast (Chris Stearn) for their knowledge.
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« Reply #8 on: Jul 22, 2016, 07:07PM »

David M. Guion is worth reading. Good writing style.

As an undergrad I read "The Trombone: Its History and Music, 1697-1811" by Guion. It gave me lots to think about. This came as a well-needed slap upside the head, showing me that there are many facets of the trombone worth studying.  (At that stage in my development, all I was interested in was learning to play Carnival of Venice.) I see that he has also published "A History of the Trombone" (The American Wind Band). Looks like another book to put on the order list for our library.

I just did a quick Amazon search and found another Guion book that looks interesting.  Free on Kindle Unlimited, $4.99 on Prime.  "Carl Traugott Queisser and Musical Leipzig: Trombonist, Violinist, and Musical Leader in the Time of Mendelssohn."


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« Reply #9 on: Jul 22, 2016, 07:56PM »

Robert Wigness, University of Vermont

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« Reply #10 on: Jul 23, 2016, 02:44AM »

It's kinda fun to make a big bowl of popcorn and watch Kimball and Weiner duke it out over some bit of trombone trivia.


Yeah, it's the popcorn that's the fun bit.
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« Reply #11 on: Jul 23, 2016, 06:14AM »

In no particular order (and without checking whether any have passed on):
Trevor Herbert, Stewart Carter, Robin Gregory, David Guion, Henry George Fischer, Philip Bate, Anthony Baines.
I'm sure people will think of lots of others, but these are on my shelves at home.
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« Reply #12 on: Jul 23, 2016, 08:43AM »

Urbie?

Denis Wick?
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« Reply #13 on: Jul 23, 2016, 11:37AM »

dj kennedy of chester
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« Reply #14 on: Jul 23, 2016, 12:02PM »

Doug Yeo?
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« Reply #15 on: Jul 23, 2016, 12:36PM »

In no particular order (and without checking whether any have passed on):
Trevor Herbert, Stewart Carter, Robin Gregory, David Guion, Henry George Fischer, Philip Bate, Anthony Baines.
I'm sure people will think of lots of others, but these are on my shelves at home.

Those are certainly important figures, though it is worth noting that Baines (1997) and Philip Bate (1999) are unfortunately no longer with us.

If I had to spit out ten names the first ones that come to mind are, in no particular order: Doug Yeo, David Guion, Trevor Herbert, Stewart Carter, Will Kimball, Howard Wiener, Arnold Myers, D. Murray Campbell, Herbert Heyde, and Hannes Vereecke.


Byron Pillow is trying to become the next one.

Give it time Evil
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« Reply #16 on: Jul 23, 2016, 01:00PM »

Leif, a soloist and a historian are two different things.

Ed Solomon has a massive knowledge of trombone use.  So does Howard Weiner.

Byron Pillow is trying to become the next one.

Sorry Bruce, my wife tell my English is more and more wild.....but then I would also vote for you. Good!  And other trombonist on this site like Howard, Solomon and Pillow. History is always interesting.

Leif
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« Reply #17 on: Jul 23, 2016, 04:22PM »

Kurt Dietrich for his book "Jazz 'Bones: The World of Jazz Trombone" and also "Duke's 'Bones: Ellington's Great Trombonists". Highly recommended: Actually they are masterpieces of writing about the jazz trombone. I have both in my library of jazz books.

I read that he is a trombonist with Matrix, a jazz fusion group -

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Matrix_(jazz_group)

- and a professor at Ripon College, Wisconsin.

http://www.ripon.edu/faculty/dietrichk/

I also have to say that one should be one's own historian as far as jazz trombone style is concerned. You must listen to jazz recordings from early to modern times and pick out the jazz language and style adopted by all the top trombone players. Also study transcriptions - preferably done by yourself, but also the David Baker book "Jazz Styles & Analysis: Trombone is a good source. David himself is a great historian but does not qualify in terms of the way the question is phrased, having died in March only this year. Vale David Baker. 
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« Reply #18 on: Jul 25, 2016, 03:33PM »

We also have some specialists like John Lowe on Olds, Stewbones on Besson/Boosey, and a couple of guys on King.  And let's not forget Svenne and Blast (Chris Stearn) for their knowledge.

Thanks for the vote of (over)confidence, Bruce.

With the names that are coming up, I would be honoured to get into the top 100.

Cheers

Stewbones
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« Reply #19 on: Aug 07, 2016, 01:26AM »

Charles Toet? One of the people that actually re-introduced the use of sackbuts for historical performance..
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« Reply #20 on: Aug 07, 2016, 01:33AM »

Robb Stewart probably knows a thing or two.........
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