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Author Topic: Elon Musk  (Read 971 times)
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Zuschlag
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« on: Oct 03, 2016, 08:31AM »

What do you think of the man? What do you think of his endeavors, in Tesla and in space?
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robcat2075

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« Reply #1 on: Oct 03, 2016, 09:43AM »

I think Tesla will fail. Inadequate sales and excess competition. If oil skyrocketed again that might help them but also enable competitors who can make a cheaper electric car.


I think SpaceX will work if they can get closer to the 100% reliability of their competitor, old-school United Launch Alliance.


I think the Mars thing is dumb. A million people in space suits on Mars? They think it's going to be like a Star Trek utopia and it's really going be like living in a labor camp in Antarctica.


The brain power would be better spent on saving the Earth which is far more interesting and habitation-ready.
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Robert Holmén

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Zuschlag
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« Reply #2 on: Oct 03, 2016, 09:58AM »



The brain power would be better spent on saving the Earth which is far more interesting and habitation-ready.

And the money, of which there is oodles.
(Technical term)
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robcat2075

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« Reply #3 on: Oct 03, 2016, 11:16AM »

I like the story that Elon Musk started out just wanting to buy a Russian rocket for some kind of space probe stunt, but they wouldn't take him seriously, so he decided to develop his own.

My main gripe about SpaceX is not what they do but the emerging myth that somehow it is all private-enterprise-built from scratch without any of that pesky government stuff slowing them down or that they're doing things that NASA could never figure out.

The reality is they are hugely dependent on seven decades of government rocket R&D and the experts who got trained under it.

Soft landing a rocket? NASA had that checked off in the 60s.  That's how you land on the Moon.

Launch a rocket at all? Not without the huge cooperation of NASA and it's conveniently already-built-at-tax-payer-expense launch site and tracking infrastructure.
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Robert Holmén

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« Reply #4 on: Oct 04, 2016, 12:16PM »

Sabotage speculation gathers around SpaceX explosion
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Robert Holmén

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« Reply #5 on: Oct 05, 2016, 01:19PM »


Soft landing a rocket? NASA had that checked off in the 60s.  That's how you land on the Moon.
Get out of here with that logic nonsense.
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« Reply #6 on: Oct 05, 2016, 01:34PM »


Soft landing a rocket? NASA had that checked off in the 60s.  That's how you land on the Moon.


Yes... but you can't pretend that landing in a vacuum in .25G is little different than landing one on Earth.
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« Reply #7 on: Oct 05, 2016, 01:46PM »

This is the way to go:

http://mars.nasa.gov/mer/mission/spacecraft_edl_airbags.html
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BGuttman
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« Reply #8 on: Oct 05, 2016, 02:13PM »


You mean each rocket comes with its own "bouncy tent"? :-P
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« Reply #9 on: Oct 05, 2016, 05:23PM »

Yes... but you can't pretend that landing in a vacuum in .25G is little different than landing one on Earth.

I'll note that a SpaceX booster landing has the advantage of aerodynamic effects to slow it, stabilize it and guide it on the way down.  You get none of that on the Moon. The rocket has to do everything.

The gravity is indeed less on the moon  but starting from 50 miles up it's still going to be a pretty serious impact if your rocket doesn't work.

I see it mostly as a matter of scale rather than a paradigm shift.
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Robert Holmén

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« Reply #10 on: Nov 08, 2016, 11:26AM »

Your forgetting about heat build-up due to friction.
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« Reply #11 on: Nov 08, 2016, 12:21PM »

Your forgetting about heat build-up due to friction.

The SpaceX rockets seem not to be highly outfitted with heat shielding. 

They are not like a capsule returning from orbit that slams into the atmosphere at high speed. They do a big deceleration burn outside the atmosphere to eliminate most of the horizontal motion.

Doing a bit of math from available numbers, the remaining downward vertical travel of the rocket from 1st stage separation to landing (45 mi in 7.5 minutes) is an average of 348 mph, much less than an airliner endures without needing heat shielding.





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Robert Holmén

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