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The Trombone ForumTeaching & LearningPractice Room(Moderator: blast) One corner is stronger than the other
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trb420
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« on: Jan 04, 2017, 06:39PM »

So when I play I try to keep my corners firm but I've noticed that one of my corners has more muscular structure and is easier to keep anchored in place than the other, which tends to stay farther backwards, as opposed to the stronger side which I can keep forward more easily. Aside from that I have a fairly well developed embouchiure. Is there nothing I can go to strengthen the other corner? Thanks
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Doug Elliott
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« Reply #1 on: Jan 04, 2017, 06:49PM »

It may not be important at all.  Faces and structure are not always very symmetrical.
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paulyg
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« Reply #2 on: Jan 04, 2017, 07:50PM »

I thought I had this problem, until I started buzzing with only the rim. I was applying uneven pressure to my face, due to the angle I was holding the horn. Make sure you're holding the instrument so that the slide sticks straight out from your face, and go from there.
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Father Odin
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« Reply #3 on: Jan 10, 2017, 12:26AM »

Perhaps your trombone is positioned slightly off center on your lips. This would mean that one of the corners has to work harder to be the same and thereby will look different than the other based on the amount the muscles have to tighten/firm up. I noticed lopsided corners in my own playing some months ago and obsessed over it for a while (I discovered during the process that my horn goes off to the left slightly), but I was eventually told that it doesn't make a difference. As long as you aren't leaking air and the lopsidedness isn't formed by stretching and molding your lips to the mouthpiece you should be fine.

I would like to know though, is your trombone slightly at an angle from your face or are you perfectly straight on? Most players I meet play straight on.

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