Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length

 
Advanced search

1080382 Posts in 71498 Topics- by 19054 Members - Latest Member: trombonejb
Jump to:  
Pages: 1 2 [All]   Go Down
Print
Author Topic: Joining a community orchestra  (Read 4089 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
davdud101
The Kid

*
Offline Offline

Location: Detroit, MI
Joined: Jun 20, 2014
Posts: 981
"Put yourself in the shoes of the listener."


View Profile WWW
« on: Jan 05, 2017, 03:51AM »

Hey guys!
I have planned to join my local community orchestra a couple of months after I get myself settled state-side. But the issue I need to work out is figuring out which instrument I should apply for. Anyone at ANY age above high school level is allowed to join this orchestra. I haven't really considered doing tenor trombone, but my sights are for the moment set on either trumpet OR playing bass on my large bore.
The big thing here is that my reading is not *very* good on trumpet, but it'll improve a LOT, FAST by joining this group (this I know, because my reading has always improved when I've been in a group, rather than alone in a practice room working on tone and technique without any tunes or goals). However, my bass trombone playing/low-range reading could also improve a lot - not that I have any SERIOUS needs for it, but it'd be fun to get better in that way anyway.

What are some thoughts on this? I don't really have so many goals with the trombone (or bass, even) at the moment, and I'm certain it'd be *more* useful for myself to join as a trumpeter, but what would you guys do?  :-P
Logged

Don't practice until you get it right.
Practice until you can't get it wrong.
Geezerhorn

*
Offline Offline

Location: PA
Joined: Feb 9, 2012
Posts: 5459
"Lego My Trombone"


View Profile
« Reply #1 on: Jan 05, 2017, 05:42AM »

I'm not sure what you should do. But what I would do would be first to scout them and find out what they needed the most, then see if I could fill that position. Otherwise, I would just present myself and let them figure it out. If I didn't like it, I have the option of either not going back or using it as a stepping-stone to something either within them or elsewhere that I really wanted.

...Geezer
Logged

LowrBrass

*
Offline Offline

Location: Philadelphia-ish, PA
Joined: May 17, 2015
Posts: 378

View Profile
« Reply #2 on: Jan 05, 2017, 05:44AM »

For local community orchestra?

If you want to play trumpet, play trumpet!

I can guarantee they'll be thrilled to have you, even if your reading isn't *very* good on trumpet. You may not be a great reader in your mind, but you're probably a savant by community standards.

Orchestral bass 'bone parts don't necessarily go that low, so it might not be a fruitful endeavor anyway.
Logged
harrison.t.reed
*
Offline Offline

Location: Colorado
Joined: Apr 5, 2007
Posts: 2555
"Spartan Brass Band!"


View Profile
« Reply #3 on: Jan 05, 2017, 05:47AM »

Are you sure it's fair to the group for you to knowingly join on instruments or reading levels that you are weak on?

Why wouldn't you improve the group and join on the instrument you are best at?
Logged

"My technique is as good as Initial D"
T-396A - Griego 1C
88HTCL - Griego 1C
36H - DE XT105, C+, D Alto Shank
3B/F Silversonic - Griego 1A ss
pBone (with Yellow bell for bright tone)
robcat2075

*
Offline Offline

Location: Dallas, Texas
Joined: Apr 19, 2009
Posts: 5920

View Profile
« Reply #4 on: Jan 05, 2017, 07:20AM »

If it's a community orchestra playing standard repertoire music you won't get much sight reading practice on any brass instrument. Lots of practice counting rests.

If they play adaptations or pop music you might get a bit more action.

If you want more sight reading practice, join a band.

Logged

Robert Holmén

Hear me as I Play My Horn


Get your Popper, Dotzauer, or Kummer play-alongs!
hyperbolica
*
Offline Offline

Location: Eastern US
Joined: Oct 19, 2014
Posts: 1357

View Profile
« Reply #5 on: Jan 05, 2017, 07:49AM »

You might also be surprised that even community orchestras sometimes have auditions, and they usually keep people for the whole season unless someone leaves. Orchestras generally don't have 8 trombones, they will limit it to 3 or 4. Community bands are more likely to take anyone who shows up.

Best of luck.
Logged
Geezerhorn

*
Offline Offline

Location: PA
Joined: Feb 9, 2012
Posts: 5459
"Lego My Trombone"


View Profile
« Reply #6 on: Jan 05, 2017, 07:54AM »

You might also be surprised that even community orchestras sometimes have auditions, and they usually keep people for the whole season unless someone leaves. Orchestras generally don't have 8 trombones, they will limit it to 3 or 4. Community bands are more likely to take anyone who shows up.

Best of luck.

True, but they also often times have a sub list. Not entirely sure how that works, but I would guess it involves having everyone at rehearsals and then picking the best available for a concert, with the "understudies" filling in and/or on reserve call-up? Anyone have experience with this scenario?

...Geezer
Logged

Steven

*
Offline Offline

Location: Bonistan, New York
Joined: Dec 12, 2007
Posts: 2301

View Profile
« Reply #7 on: Jan 05, 2017, 07:58AM »

The answer depends on so many factors. 

  • What parts does the orchestra need covered?  I sure wouldn't double a trumpet part, and leave a trombone part uncovered. 
  • How strong is the orchestra?  In community orchestras where I've played, the brass have always been solid.  I've got a trumpet and a tuba at home, but if I played them in this group, I would not be adding to the quality.  (I play in other groups that beg me to bring my tuba.) 
  • How many rehearsals does the group have for a given concert?  Plenty of community orchestras have dreadfully long rehearsal seasons for a single concert.  Why not play trumpet?  It takes plenty of the string players that long to get up to speed.


Talk to the music director.  They've always been honest and helpful to me.
Logged

Steven Cangemi
JohnL
Edge Monster

*
Offline Offline

Location: Anaheim, CA, USA
Joined: Aug 1, 2004
Posts: 7173

View Profile WWW
« Reply #8 on: Jan 05, 2017, 08:29AM »

If your sight reading on Bb trumpet playing Bb music isn't strong, you're really going to have trouble when they throw a part written in D at you.

That said, if you can get the music in advance, sight reading would be less of a problem. It seems to me that a lot of community orchestras get most of their repertoire off of IMSLP; if that's the case, all you need to know is what to download.
Logged

Question change.
Embrace progress.
Take the time to learn the difference.
Steven

*
Offline Offline

Location: Bonistan, New York
Joined: Dec 12, 2007
Posts: 2301

View Profile
« Reply #9 on: Jan 05, 2017, 09:20AM »

True, but they also often times have a sub list. Not entirely sure how that works, but I would guess it involves having everyone at rehearsals and then picking the best available for a concert, with the "understudies" filling in and/or on reserve call-up? Anyone have experience with this scenario?

I'm not sure there is is any typical when discussing community groups.  In groups I've seen, the subs, when needed, have been ringers.  They are highly capable players who are not usually members of the group.
Logged

Steven Cangemi
timothy42b
*
Offline Offline

Location: Colonial Heights, Virginia, US
Joined: Dec 7, 2000
Posts: 12135

View Profile
« Reply #10 on: Jan 05, 2017, 09:22AM »

If it's a community orchestra playing standard repertoire music you won't get much sight reading practice on any brass instrument. Lots of practice counting rests.

Much?  You shouldn't get any.  The rep is published and you should prepare it before the first rehearsal.  In fact, you should have listened to each piece and made an attempt to understand the music in entirety, not just the trombone part, before the first rehearsal.

That isn't always practical, but it should be the goal. 
Logged

Tim Richardson
Geezerhorn

*
Offline Offline

Location: PA
Joined: Feb 9, 2012
Posts: 5459
"Lego My Trombone"


View Profile
« Reply #11 on: Jan 05, 2017, 09:29AM »

I'm not sure there is is any typical when discussing community groups.  In groups I've seen, the subs, when needed, have been ringers.  They are highly capable players who are not usually members of the group.

Absolutely the case - in my experience with community bands. I hate it, although I bend over back'ards to help them by pointing out quirks in the music that popped out during rehearsals - quirks that may not be self-evident to even a skilled sight-reader. After all, the goal is to make good music via teamwork. I was hoping that community orchestras would operate at a higher level though <sigh>.

...Geezer
Logged

hyperbolica
*
Offline Offline

Location: Eastern US
Joined: Oct 19, 2014
Posts: 1357

View Profile
« Reply #12 on: Jan 05, 2017, 09:37AM »

True, but they also often times have a sub list. Not entirely sure how that works, but I would guess it involves having everyone at rehearsals and then picking the best available for a concert, with the "understudies" filling in and/or on reserve call-up? Anyone have experience with this scenario?

...Geezer

In the groups where I play, ringers are used in sections where they just can't find enough amateur players, like the violin section. Subs are sometimes handled by the player who is going to be absent, or maybe the director, or a personnel manager. Some groups do have a formal sub list. Some don't.
Logged
BGuttman
Mad Chemist

*
*
Offline Offline

Location: Londonderry, NH, USA
Joined: Dec 12, 2000
Posts: 50824
"Almost Professional"


View Profile
« Reply #13 on: Jan 05, 2017, 09:39AM »

True, but they also often times have a sub list. Not entirely sure how that works, but I would guess it involves having everyone at rehearsals and then picking the best available for a concert, with the "understudies" filling in and/or on reserve call-up? Anyone have experience with this scenario?

...Geezer

I play in several orchestras in this area and can describe what most of them do:

"Solo" chairs, i.e. where one player plays a part, are filled with regulars if available.  If a regular is not available there is usually a list of preferred substitutes.  In my orchestra we have 4 trombone players; 3 are regulars and one is the sub.  The sub gets to play a lot since the regulars often have to bow out of performances due to external commitments.  This coming concert we had one regular and the sub bow out and I'm bringing in a promising youngster for some experience.

If you play an orchestral string (violin, viola, cello, bass) anybody is welcome, almost regardless of ability.  If instead of trumpet you decided to play viola, there is no limit on how many groups would take you in (depending on how well you can play).  I know of a few trombonists who learned an orchestral string in order to get known by an orchestra so when a trombone chair opened up they were there.

Community bands will often take whomever is available.  The trombone section in the Hollis Town Band has varied from 2 to 12 during the years I was there.  In some bands there is a limit.  For example, in the Nevers Band of Concord NH we only have 3 trombone folders and it's tough to read 3 players on a folder; 2 is the limit.  So Nevers limits the trombones to 6.
Logged

Bruce Guttman
Solo Trombone, Hollis Town Band
Merrimack Valley Philharmonic Orch. President 2017-2018
timothy42b
*
Offline Offline

Location: Colonial Heights, Virginia, US
Joined: Dec 7, 2000
Posts: 12135

View Profile
« Reply #14 on: Jan 05, 2017, 10:14AM »

Absolutely the case - in my experience with community bands. I hate it,
...Geezer

I'm with you there.  Though the ringers (in a band) are usually excellent players, they tend to do it their way and we end up accommodating them, so tempo and dynamic changes we worked on don't get used, etc.  One band I play in always has ringers show up at the concert, and it's always less than optimal. 

Sitting in an orchestra as an inexperienced trumpet?  I would never dare.  There's only one of you, you're very exposed, and they expect a level of professional expertise out of trumpet and trombone that isn't required on second desk violin or viola. 
Logged

Tim Richardson
SteveP
*
Offline Offline

Location: Arizona Desert
Joined: Sep 25, 2014
Posts: 33

View Profile
« Reply #15 on: Jan 05, 2017, 10:44AM »

Much?  You shouldn't get any.  The rep is published and you should prepare it before the first rehearsal.
What kind of community groups are you playing in?  I've been playing in various ones (orchestras and bands) for about fifty years and have never, ever been given the music before the first rehearsal.

As for the op's question, go where the need is.  If you don't know the group's personnel make-up then talk to the conductor.  You will probably be up to speed on any part in no time at all.
Logged

Steve
Lake Havasu Regional Orchestra
Lake Havasu Symphonic Winds
BGuttman
Mad Chemist

*
*
Offline Offline

Location: Londonderry, NH, USA
Joined: Dec 12, 2000
Posts: 50824
"Almost Professional"


View Profile
« Reply #16 on: Jan 05, 2017, 11:02AM »

What kind of community groups are you playing in?  I've been playing in various ones (orchestras and bands) for about fifty years and have never, ever been given the music before the first rehearsal.

As for the op's question, go where the need is.  If you don't know the group's personnel make-up then talk to the conductor.  You will probably be up to speed on any part in no time at all.

As an orchestra Librarian (in addition to trombonist) I will try to hand out the next concert's music when they turn in the current concert's music.  So I will have the May concert music at the March concert.  When I can I will have the March concert music at the Christmas Concert and usually most of the Christmas concert music at the November concert.  I don't hand out November concert music in advance.

When I can, I will refer to IMSLP so players can get a head start on their parts if they are so inclined.  String players tend to be pretty finicky on bowings and often will want their real parts and have to wait.  With a new piece I try to give the Conductor and the Concert Master parts to work out the bowings in advance (mostly for major works; Pops stuff is done ad hoc).
Logged

Bruce Guttman
Solo Trombone, Hollis Town Band
Merrimack Valley Philharmonic Orch. President 2017-2018
Geezerhorn

*
Offline Offline

Location: PA
Joined: Feb 9, 2012
Posts: 5459
"Lego My Trombone"


View Profile
« Reply #17 on: Jan 05, 2017, 11:11AM »

Good discussion points, guys!

The other thing I dislike about a band calling in it's "ringers" is getting passed over for a higher part that I could easily play. Not fair. That said, I totally don't mind their calling in someone to fill in the bottom part(s).

...Geezer
Logged

BGuttman
Mad Chemist

*
*
Offline Offline

Location: Londonderry, NH, USA
Joined: Dec 12, 2000
Posts: 50824
"Almost Professional"


View Profile
« Reply #18 on: Jan 05, 2017, 11:28AM »

I joined a community orchestra where all the first parts were filled by ringers.  Meant that all the rehearsals the key solos were silent.  Drove me nuts.  Then the ringers would come in for the last rehearsal and the concert.  We might as well have skipped all the rehearsals before.

Fortunately, that conductor got sacked after she "fired" me and the next one promoted the best players of the regulars to the Principal chairs.

I don't mind being picky about the principal players, but if you are a principal player in one of these organizations you should be at all (or at least most of) the rehearsals.
Logged

Bruce Guttman
Solo Trombone, Hollis Town Band
Merrimack Valley Philharmonic Orch. President 2017-2018
bubba7753
*
Offline Offline

Location:
Joined: Jan 13, 2009
Posts: 98

View Profile
« Reply #19 on: Jan 05, 2017, 11:32AM »

and i'd bet the ringers got paid
Logged
BGuttman
Mad Chemist

*
*
Offline Offline

Location: Londonderry, NH, USA
Joined: Dec 12, 2000
Posts: 50824
"Almost Professional"


View Profile
« Reply #20 on: Jan 05, 2017, 11:45AM »

and i'd bet the ringers got paid

You betcha.

In my current groups the Principals are not paid extra (except for the Concert Master).  The MVPO gives all the adult musicians an honorarium per concert, which was based on an agreement with the AFM (originally you had to be an AFM member to get the honorarium).  Other groups are unpaid.  When I am asked to sub at the last minute I usually get a small amount of money; especially if I'm not a regular member of the group.
Logged

Bruce Guttman
Solo Trombone, Hollis Town Band
Merrimack Valley Philharmonic Orch. President 2017-2018
stephenkerry

*
Offline Offline

Location: Reading, Old England
Joined: Nov 9, 2001
Posts: 366

View Profile
« Reply #21 on: Jan 05, 2017, 11:58AM »

Orchestra presents different challenges to band; just because there may not be a lot to play doesn't mean it will be easy, even if the notes look easy on paper. They have to to be pretty perfect and you have to know not just your own music, but what the others are doing, otherwise you will miss entries.
Really a lot depends on the standard of the orchestra, I joined an amateur orchestra not long ago; they are a good standard and ambitious, and commission quite a bit of new music, as well as standard repertoire - the last concert was Mahler 2, which got a 10 minute standing ovation and I was immensely chuffed to get the cance to play 1st Trom in such a great piece, something I never expected as it's the fist orchestra I've joined, and I'm not so young.
I've also played trumpet with them quite a few times with them in the past (as a dep).  So regarding reading; on bass trom you may not be needed all the time. On tenor you will encounter bass, tenor and alto clefs with some frequency. On trumpet you will have to transpose many parts; Trumpet in F or E are quite common.  This orchestra has intense all day rehearsals for two or three weekends (daytime) before a concert, but not weekly rehearsals, which would not appeal to me on brass; the schedule (ie when you are required in a rehearsa) is also published.   
I like the challenge and the discipline, it isn't for everyone. You will also find that you cannot rely on colleagues in the section to play at the same time or pattern as yourself, so it helps to be reasonably confident. It is not normal to have two players on a part.  
Logged

Trinity Concert Band, Earley, Reading UK
Aldworth Philharmonic Orchestra, Reading
Greyfriars Church Reading; Music Group
4Bones trombone quartet; 5T Brass Quintet
ex Millstones Dance Band, Wokingham
Geezerhorn

*
Offline Offline

Location: PA
Joined: Feb 9, 2012
Posts: 5459
"Lego My Trombone"


View Profile
« Reply #22 on: Jan 05, 2017, 12:10PM »

and i'd bet the ringers got paid

 >:(  >:(  >:(  >:(

...Geezer
Logged

ronnies
*
Offline Offline

Location: Edinburgh, Scotland
Joined: Jul 18, 2016
Posts: 111

View Profile
« Reply #23 on: Jan 05, 2017, 02:23PM »

Meant that all the rehearsals the key solos were silent.

When we played Mahler 1 just before Christmas, the first time I heard the tuba solo in the third movement and the magnificent low F in the first was at the performance.  I'd been filling them in at every rehearsal. :-)

Ronnie
Logged

--
Slowly getting back into it...
robcat2075

*
Offline Offline

Location: Dallas, Texas
Joined: Apr 19, 2009
Posts: 5920

View Profile
« Reply #24 on: Jan 05, 2017, 03:23PM »

Worst attitudes I've encountered have been paid ringers. "Just gimme my check so I can get out of here!"
Logged

Robert Holmén

Hear me as I Play My Horn


Get your Popper, Dotzauer, or Kummer play-alongs!
davdud101
The Kid

*
Offline Offline

Location: Detroit, MI
Joined: Jun 20, 2014
Posts: 981
"Put yourself in the shoes of the listener."


View Profile WWW
« Reply #25 on: Jan 06, 2017, 04:53AM »

Oi- didn't do my research  :-0 the group is ACTUALLY a community band, not an orchestra - no string players. Sorry if that caused a bit of confusion! That opens up the possibilities a bit more, I'd think, although I cant necessarily count on them hurting for trumpet players.

In my mind, in regards to joining a group like this, that's "just for fun" and anyone can join- I've got aspirations and goals that I want to reach as a trumpet player that are FAR above my trombone playing- not to say that I could smoke (or even come close to) any of the trombone players in a community band at ALL, but rather that I have aims that I want to achieve on trumpet that can't necessarily be reached by sitting alone in a practice room with little practice material and little contact with other players.
I will of course NOT allow an open trombone seat to remain empty in favor of chasing my own 'dream', but if I get the chance to join as a trumpeter, then it'll be to far more use for me personally. It seems rather self-centered and narcissistic now that I write it down.  Amazed

When you guys are looking to join groups like these for fun and HAVE the chance to play other instruments, would you grasp at the opportunity to improve your skills in a weaker area, OR are aim improve the quality of the group by playing an instrument you're already proficient at?

I'm sending an email to the director to see what they'd be most in need of for the coming season, and what kind of audition material they have for high school students (then i could at least scope out what level they're playing at).
Logged

Don't practice until you get it right.
Practice until you can't get it wrong.
Geezerhorn

*
Offline Offline

Location: PA
Joined: Feb 9, 2012
Posts: 5459
"Lego My Trombone"


View Profile
« Reply #26 on: Jan 06, 2017, 04:59AM »

Oi- didn't do my research  :-0 the group is ACTUALLY a community band, not an orchestra - no string players. Sorry if that caused a bit of confusion! That opens up the possibilities a bit more, I'd think, although I cant necessarily count on them hurting for trumpet players.

In my mind, in regards to joining a group like this, that's "just for fun" and anyone can join- I've got aspirations and goals that I want to reach as a trumpet player that are FAR above my trombone playing- not to say that I could smoke (or even come close to) any of the trombone players in a community band at ALL, but rather that I have aims that I want to achieve on trumpet that can't necessarily be reached by sitting alone in a practice room with little practice material and little contact with other players.
I will of course NOT allow an open trombone seat to remain empty in favor of chasing my own 'dream', but if I get the chance to join as a trumpeter, then it'll be to far more use for me personally. It seems rather self-centered and narcissistic now that I write it down.  Amazed

When you guys are looking to join groups like these for fun and HAVE the chance to play other instruments, would you grasp at the opportunity to improve your skills in a weaker area, OR are aim improve the quality of the group by playing an instrument you're already proficient at?

I'm sending an email to the director to see what they'd be most in need of for the coming season, and what kind of audition material they have for high school students (then i could at least scope out what level they're playing at).

I don't think it's narcissistic at all. Keep this in mind: you are a volunteer. You are doing volunteer's work - that happens to provide entertainment to people. There is no moral law that states you must be miserable while you are volunteering your time, energy and ability. So if what motivates you to do volunteer work is self-improvement, there is nothing wrong with that. It's as good a reason as any.

In casual conversation with people who inquire what I am doing with all the free time I have now that I am retired, I tell them I do volunteer work. When they ask what and where, I tell them I provide entertainment to people free of charge via the various public bands I am involved with. When I see the puzzled look on their faces, I tell them there isn't anything wrong with having fun while I am volunteering my time.

Everyone wins. But what really drives me to do it is the fun, the sense of social involvement AND the prospect of learning new things as a musician.

...Geezer
Logged

timothy42b
*
Offline Offline

Location: Colonial Heights, Virginia, US
Joined: Dec 7, 2000
Posts: 12135

View Profile
« Reply #27 on: Jan 06, 2017, 05:03AM »


When you guys are looking to join groups like these for fun and HAVE the chance to play other instruments, would you grasp at the opportunity to improve your skills in a weaker area, OR are aim improve the quality of the group by playing an instrument you're already proficient at?

Either, both, depending on the group.

I would not play something so badly it hurt the group.  But if I were adequate I could see using the opportunity to improve.  Adequate by the standards of that group, I mean, not adequate at a pro level.

The other consideration might be your reputation.  If you are known as skilled on trombone first, and play as a beginner on trumpet, you'll be seen one way.  If you are unknown and play trumpet badly, they will just see you as a bad trumpet player.   
Logged

Tim Richardson
LowrBrass

*
Offline Offline

Location: Philadelphia-ish, PA
Joined: May 17, 2015
Posts: 378

View Profile
« Reply #28 on: Jan 07, 2017, 06:05AM »

What the Tims said.

When you guys are looking to join groups like these for fun and HAVE the chance to play other instruments, would you grasp at the opportunity to improve your skills in a weaker area, OR are aim improve the quality of the group by playing an instrument you're already proficient at?

Personally: I like balance myself by playing in some groups that I'm underqualified for AND some groups I'm overqualified for.
'Underqualified' is an opportunity to improve myself! I love playing with better musicians!
'Overqualified' is an opportunity to be that better musician for others!

The only way to get better at something is to DO it.
If we shouldn't bring our instruments out in public until we play at a pro level, then what's the point of community bands?

I got a bass trombone last year, and I'm still not as agile on it as I am on tenor. I woodshedded for five months before I felt comfortable agreeing to bring it out in public for a community orchestra sub (no $$$, and I went to all the rehearsals [on the subject of ringers]). As clumsy as I am on bass, they were still THRILLED with me. I now play bass regularly with two other bands.

You're already a pretty good musician. Trumpet or not, people will respect your playing, and you'll be fine. Don't worry about the self-centeredness. We all do this because WE WANT TO. 

There's no substitute for playing with people. If you want to play trumpet, YES, play trumpet!
Logged
Geezerhorn

*
Offline Offline

Location: PA
Joined: Feb 9, 2012
Posts: 5459
"Lego My Trombone"


View Profile
« Reply #29 on: Jan 07, 2017, 06:32AM »

What the Tims said.

Personally: I like balance myself by playing in some groups that I'm underqualified for AND some groups I'm overqualified for.
'Underqualified' is an opportunity to improve myself! I love playing with better musicians!
'Overqualified' is an opportunity to be that better musician for others!

The only way to get better at something is to DO it.
If we shouldn't bring our instruments out in public until we play at a pro level, then what's the point of community bands?

I got a bass trombone last year, and I'm still not as agile on it as I am on tenor. I woodshedded for five months before I felt comfortable agreeing to bring it out in public for a community orchestra sub (no $$$, and I went to all the rehearsals [on the subject of ringers]). As clumsy as I am on bass, they were still THRILLED with me. I now play bass regularly with two other bands.

You're already a pretty good musician. Trumpet or not, people will respect your playing, and you'll be fine. Don't worry about the self-centeredness. We all do this because WE WANT TO. 

There's no substitute for playing with people. If you want to play trumpet, YES, play trumpet!

Well-stated!

It's all good if it's done out of love and respect. If and when that is no longer the case, time to leave.

...Geezer
Logged

Steven

*
Offline Offline

Location: Bonistan, New York
Joined: Dec 12, 2007
Posts: 2301

View Profile
« Reply #30 on: Feb 01, 2017, 07:50AM »

It's all good if it's done out of love and respect. If and when that is no longer the case, time to leave.

To be honest, I'm running out of love and respect for my large ensemble, but it's not quite time to leave.
Logged

Steven Cangemi
Geezerhorn

*
Offline Offline

Location: PA
Joined: Feb 9, 2012
Posts: 5459
"Lego My Trombone"


View Profile
« Reply #31 on: Feb 01, 2017, 08:21AM »

To be honest, I'm running out of love and respect for my large ensemble, but it's not quite time to leave.

You will know when it is.

In one night, I fell completely out of love with a band, quit and never went back. Sometimes it's not about the music.

...Geezer
Logged

Graham Martin
Purveyor of 'HOT' Jazz

*
Offline Offline

Location: Redland Bay, Queensland, AUSTRALIA
Joined: Nov 5, 2000
Posts: 11391
"Dixieland/Mainstream/Big Band"


View Profile
« Reply #32 on: Feb 01, 2017, 03:37PM »

If you don't enjoy it, don't do it.

Community bands work in different ways but they must have a good organising committee and good conductors. The musicians come and go and tend to be of varying talent. In my experience, the quality of the band also varies over the years, mainly depending on the above.

I think with a community band you have to be prepared to put in a lot compared with what you might get out of it.

I very much appreciate the organisers and the musicians in my local community band and thank most of them for their dedication. Actually it is more than just a band. It is really five bands consisting of: Beginner's Concert Band, Jazz Improvisation Beginner's Band, Big Band Way cool, Wind Ensemble (Concert band) and the #1 Concert Band. Sometimes there are special interest bands formed and I once ran a vintage Ellington band, after the style of the Cotton Club Orchestra, which is what we called it.

This is my community band, The Redland City Bands:

http://redlandcitybands.org.au/
http://redlandcitybands.org.au/our-bands-2/big-band/

The Redland Big Band is the only community band I play with these days but there have been times when I was playing with four community bands at the same time. All part of this mainly Trad Jazz player's bucket list item to play 1st Bone in a big jazz/swing band, which I did for all of them. Pant They were also well organised bands with some terrific musicians Good! :

Kate Street Mob:  http://www.brizwestensembles.org/kate-street-mob

Urban Swing:  https://www.bandmix.com.au/mike1664/

With community bands it is very like I said, "You only get out of it what you put into it". Clever There are a few musicians who are only in a community band for what they can get out of it and I must say I have at times been slightly guilty of that approach. But really my advice is "Go in boots and all!" with the instrument you prefer. I personally do not think that trumpet and trombone is ever a good double from an amateur's embouchure point of view. But maybe that is an oldie with some lip problems talking.
Logged

Grah

"May God bless and keep you always
May your wishes all come true
May you always do for others
And let others do for you
May you build a ladder to the stars
And climb on every rung
May you stay......forever young."
uncle duke
*
Offline Offline

Location:
Joined: Jan 15, 2017
Posts: 105

View Profile
« Reply #33 on: Feb 01, 2017, 04:26PM »

To be honest, I'm running out of love and respect for my large ensemble, but it's not quite time to leave.
Showing up with a different horn can be a welcome change for a few months.  If you're o.k. with the old saying "if you don't do it, someone else will" and don't mind someone else taking your stand then yes, you can say you've had enough and walk away. 
Logged
Steven

*
Offline Offline

Location: Bonistan, New York
Joined: Dec 12, 2007
Posts: 2301

View Profile
« Reply #34 on: Feb 16, 2017, 06:19PM »

Showing up with a different horn can be a welcome change for a few months.  If you're o.k. with the old saying "if you don't do it, someone else will" and don't mind someone else taking your stand then yes, you can say you've had enough and walk away. 

In this particular group, if I leave there will be nobody to take the part.  That's part of the problem, and part of why I stay.  There aren't that many ensembles within a reasonable commute.  Just a few years ago, this community orchestra had an excellent trombone section.  Then one player moved away, and another transferred to a four year school.  That leaves me, and two years later, it's still just me.  In the same city, there is a superior wind ensemble.  I would love to play in this group, but I have a hard time justifying leaving a group that is desperate for trombones to double a part in a different group.  Barring something unexpectedly terrible, I will finish the spring in this orchestra.  I should spend some of the summer thinking about where to play come fall.
Logged

Steven Cangemi
Pages: 1 2 [All]   Go Up
Print
Jump to: