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Poll
Question: What do you call your daily practice?
Warm-up - 2 (22.2%)
Daily routine - 7 (77.8%)
Total Voters: 9

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Author Topic: Daily routine or warm-up  (Read 828 times)
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bonenick

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« on: Jan 07, 2017, 12:05AM »

At trumpetmaster we had this big discussion...

The point is...the facial muscles do not need warming up in the way the abs or other big muscles in our body do.

As long as we cover the basics every day, we don't need to do a whole lot of playing before getting ready to play a gig.

Most professional are able to get ready to play in 5 min, sometimes even less. Do you agree with that?

So, daily routine or a warm-up?

or...do you need a lengthy warm-up before starting your daily routine?
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Doug Elliott
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« Reply #1 on: Jan 07, 2017, 12:23AM »

I do not view "warming up" as most people do.

I view it as a time to establish your personal proper form so that it will carry over into the rest of your playing day.

That may include "warming up the muscles" and the breathing system and softening the vibrating tissues and reminding yourself mentally and physically of all the things you do to play.

That may involve a considerable amount of time in the first decade or two of your playing life.  After that, not so much.

What professionals do is completely unrelated to what students should do.  They didn't get where they are by 5 minutes of prep time.
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EdGrissom

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« Reply #2 on: Jan 07, 2017, 03:57AM »

I can tell by the first note I play what kind day my chops are gonna have.   Anyone else that way?
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« Reply #3 on: Jan 07, 2017, 05:27AM »

I can tell by the first note I play what kind day my chops are gonna have.   Anyone else that way?

No. Let me give an example. I started learning double-tonguing. I guess I over-did it one day. The next day, I could play just as well, but the muscles I use for double-tonguing were fatigued, so that part of playing was out the window. Otherwise, I played just as well as always. So I wouldn't put too much emPHAsis on the wrong sylLAble.

Lol. Isn't that putting a WHOLE lot of pressure on that one note? Seems to me that is a recipe for an anxiety attack!

...Geezer
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Pre59

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« Reply #4 on: Jan 07, 2017, 08:42AM »

I like to use gizmos, so that by the time I play the first note on the horn, my embouchure is solid and then I'm just re-establishing my relationship with it. Plus, I like the daily practice or warm-up to reflect any up coming events. Likewise, for post event practice, to include looking at any shortcomings that need dealing with.
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Geezerhorn

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« Reply #5 on: Jan 07, 2017, 09:26AM »

I like use gizmos, so that by the time I play the first note on the horn, my embouchure is solid and then I'm just re-establishing my relationship with it. Plus, I like the daily practice or warm-up to reflect any up coming events. Likewise, for post event practice, to include looking at any shortcomings that need dealing with.

That is pretty similar to what I do, not that I'm any expert or anything, but I do know ME. I see merit in a pre-warm-up before horn goes to face; kinda like some runners do when stretching before actually running. And at my age, I think I need to be a little kinder & gentler to my muscles - making sure they are well warmed-up before exertion.

Towards the end of a session, I like to hit some spots that gave me trouble. At the very conclusion of a session, I like to re-center my embouchure and tone in the lower/middle range b/c that range has always been problematic for me; not as much lately - due to the priority I've been giving it.

...Geezer
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William Lang
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« Reply #6 on: Jan 07, 2017, 10:41AM »

Every day that I have time, I do an hour to two hours of warm up and maintenance work before rehearsals. This way, when I don't have time to warm up, say due to travel or an early rehearsal hour, I have a large base of playing to draw on, and can be gig-ready in about 1 minute.
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Geezerhorn

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« Reply #7 on: Jan 07, 2017, 10:44AM »

Every day that I have time, I do an hour to two hours of warm up and maintenance work before rehearsals. This way, when I don't have time to warm up, say due to travel or an early rehearsal hour, I have a large base of playing to draw on, and can be gig-ready in about 1 minute.

Really? Are you sure you are warmed up at that point? lol Most of us would be gassed.  Pant Pant

...Geezer
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bonenick

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« Reply #8 on: Jan 07, 2017, 10:45AM »

Every day that I have time, I do an hour to two hours of warm up and maintenance work...

The reason for this poll was to make a distinction between warm up and maintenance (I call it daily routine).
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William Lang
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« Reply #9 on: Jan 07, 2017, 06:09PM »

cool. i personally don't make a distinction between those two terms.

if it helps you for poll purposes or what not, I'd rather do a daily routine at home before heading to a rehearsal or show.

most professionals don't do any extended playing while at a gig out of courtesy.
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« Reply #10 on: Jan 09, 2017, 02:04PM »

All the definitions or words like warm up, daily routine, practice, perform has confused me lately. So these days I just play and enjoy.

But I believe a daily routine is good when you are a beginner and need to establish stability.

What routine? That's the question....

Leif



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« Reply #11 on: Jan 09, 2017, 07:21PM »

I do not view "warming up" as most people do.

I view it as a time to establish your personal proper form so that it will carry over into the rest of your playing day.

That may include "warming up the muscles" and the breathing system and softening the vibrating tissues and reminding yourself mentally and physically of all the things you do to play.

That may involve a considerable amount of time in the first decade or two of your playing life.  After that, not so much.

What professionals do is completely unrelated to what students should do.  They didn't get where they are by 5 minutes of prep time.

What Doug said.

S.
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« Reply #12 on: Jan 09, 2017, 10:27PM »

I'll add another vote for "What Doug said..."


For me, a "warm up" means establishing proper form and mechanics (for me), and getting the breath and tissues ready for whatever playing I have to do that day. Usually, when I'm on tour, that warm up is about 20 minutes of various exercises, which include breathing and stretching. When you tour a lot, tension starts to manifest itself in some whacked out ways.
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Josh Bledsoe
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